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Zenobia Sabrina Homan

In Mittani Palaeography, Zenobia Homan analyses cuneiform writing from the Late Bronze Age Mittani state, which was situated in the region between modern Aleppo, Erbil and Diyarbakır. The ancient communication network reveals a story of local scribal tradition blended with regional adaptation and international political change, reflecting the ways in which written knowledge travelled within the cuneiform culture of the Middle East.

Mittani signs, their forms, and variants, are described and defined in detail utilising a large digital database and discussed in relation to other regional corpora (Assyro-Mittanian, Middle Assyrian, Nuzi and Tigunanum among others). The collected data indicate that Mittanian was comparatively standardised – an innovation for the period – signifying the existence of a centralised system of scribal training.

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Edited by John M. Fossey and Beaudoin Caron

This catalogue of the Coptic Textiles in the Collection of Mediterranean Antiquities at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts provides a detailed analysis of 64 textiles from both historical and weaving practice points of view. This approach provides a fuller understanding of the cultural situation in which such textiles were produced and circulated. Dr. Landry’s experience of over 40 years of weaving and scholarship highlights the elements of knowledge and skill held and applied by weavers in Antiquity. This perspective complements and expands on the focus on imagery usually provided by art historians regarding textiles of this period. This catalogue shows how much more cultural information can be accessed when the technical, economic, and practical character of both production and use are adequately integrated into the study of material artefacts.

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Simone Paturel

The aim of this monograph is to understand the extent to which the landscape of Roman Berytus and the Bekaa valley is a product of colonial transformation following the foundation of Colonia Iulia Augusta Felix Berytus in 15 BCE. The book explores the changes observed in the cities of Berytus and Heliopolis, as well as the sites at Deir el-Qalaa, Niha, and Hosn Niha. The work fundamentally challenges the traditional paradigm, where Baalbek-Heliopolis is seen as a religious site dating from as early as the Bronze Age and associated with the worship of a Semitic or Phoenician deity triad and replaces it with a new perspective where religious activity is largely a product of colonial change.