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Das Leben und Wirken eines westgotischen Bischofs des siebten Jahrhunderts
Author: Stefan Pabst
In Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo analysiert Stefan Pabst das Leben und Wirken des westgotischen Bischofs Julian von Toledo (ca. 642–690). Im Anschluss an eine Hinführung zum historischem Umfeld und zur Biographie des Julian werden sämtliche erhaltene Schriften untersucht. Dies betrifft sowohl die die nicht-theologischen als auch die theologischen Werke. Im Zentrum der Analyse steht einerseits die Frage nach der Originalität des Autors. Julian zitiert nämlich intensiv aus den Schriften der Kirchenväter, insbesondere des Augustinus. Andererseits werden die Zielgruppe und die Intention jeder einzelnen Schrift eingehend betrachtet. Abschließend wird so ein theologisches Profil des Julian von Toledo entwickelt, das ihn als einen patristischen, einen pädagogisch-pastoralen und damit als einen spezifisch westgotischen Theologen präsentiert.

In Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo Stefan Pabst analyses the life and work of the Visigothic bishop Julian of Toledo (ca. 642–690). After a presentation of Julian's historical environment and biography, all preserved writings are analysed in detail. This includes his non-theological as well as his theological works. While, on the one hand, the analysis focusses on the question of the author’s originality, for Julian quotes extensively from the works of the Church Fathers, Augustine in particular, on the other hand, the author’s addressed audience and the intention of each individual writing are considered in detail as well. As conclusion, Julian’s profile as Theologian is presented: He is a patristic and pedagogical-pastoral theologian and thus a specifically Visigothic theologian.
A Companion to the English Dominican Province offers an account of Dominican activities in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales from their arrival in 1221 until their dissolution at the Reformation. Over the three centuries covered in this volume, the Friars Preachers not only devoted themselves to the cure of souls via preaching and hearing confessions, but they also represented English kings on diplomatic missions, influenced politics and society, and contributed to cultural, intellectual and religious life across the British Isles.
Editors: Sergey Minov and Flavia Ruani
Chapters gathered in Syriac Hagiography: Texts and Beyond explore a wide range of Syriac hagiographical works, while following two complementary methodological approaches, i.e. literary and cultic, or formal and functional. Grouped into three main sections, these contributions reflect three interrelated ways in which we can read Syriac hagiography and further grasp its characteristics: “Texts as Literature” seeks to unfold the mechanisms of their literary composition; “Saints Textualized” offers a different perspective on the role played by hagiographical texts in the invention and/or maintenance of the cult of a particular saint or group of saints; “Beyond the Texts” presents cases in which the historical reality behind the nexus of hagiographical texts and veneration of saints can be observed in greater details.
In Adam Boreel (1602-1665): A Collegiant’s Attempt to Reform Christianity, Francesco Quatrini offers a reassessment of the life and thought of Adam Boreel, a leading member of the Dutch nonconformist Collegiant movement. Usually regarded as a less important member of this religious group, Boreel is described as a forerunner whose ideas influenced later Collegiants.

Drawing on both archival and published sources, Francesco Quatrini provides the first modern biography of Boreel as well as a critical analysis of his writings. He corrects misconceptions about Boreel, who appears here as an intriguing figure who drew his views from several different sources. In this way, Francesco Quatrini revealed that Boreel was a major leader in the era’s intellectual discourse.
A Companion to Religious Minorities in Early Modern Rome investigates the lives and stories of the many groups and individuals in Rome, between 1500 and 1700, who were not Roman Catholic. It shows how early modern Catholic people and institutions in Rome were directly influenced by their interactions with other religious traditions. This collection reveals the significant impact of Protestants, Muslims, Jews, and Eastern Rite Christians; the influence of the many transient groups and individual travelers who passed through the city; the unique contributions of converts to Catholicism, who drew on the religion of their birth; and the importance of intermediaries, fluent in more than one culture and religion.
In the nineteenth century a new type of mystic emerged in Catholic Europe. While cases of stigmatisation had been reported since the thirteenth century, this era witnessed the development of the ‘stigmatic’: young women who attracted widespread interest thanks to the appearance of physical stigmata. To understand the popularity of these stigmatics we need to regard them as the ‘saints’ and religious ‘celebrities’ of their time. With their ‘miraculous’ bodies, they fit contemporary popular ideas (if not necessarily those of the Church) of what sanctity was. As knowledge about them spread via modern media and their fame became marketable, they developed into religious ‘celebrities’.
Christ’s Twofold Kingdom in Reformed Theology
In this historical study, Jonathon D. Beeke considers the various sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Reformed expressions regarding the duplex regnum Christi (the twofold kingdom of Christ), or, as especially denominated in the Lutheran context, the “doctrine of the two kingdoms.” While a sampling of patristic and medieval sources is considered, the focus is on select magisterial Reformers of the sixteenth century and representative intellectual centers of the seventeenth century (Leiden, Geneva, and Edinburgh). A primary concern is to examine the development of these formulations over the two centuries in question, and relate its maturation to the theological and political context of the early modern period. Various conclusions are offered that address the contemporary “two-kingdoms” debate within the Reformed tradition.
Author: Silke Muylaert
In Shaping the Stranger Churches: Migrants in England and the Troubles in the Netherlands, 1547-1585, Silke Muylaert explores the struggles confronting the Netherlandish churches in England when they engaged with (or disengaged from) the Reformation and the Revolt back in their homeland. The churches were conflicted over the limits of religious zeal and over political loyalty. How far could Reformers go to promote their faith without committing sin? How much loyalty did they owe to Philip II and William of Orange?

While previous narratives ascribe a certain radicalism to the foreign churches, Muylaert uncovers the difficulties confronting expatriate churches to provide support for Reformed churches or organise resistance against authorities back home.
Emmett contributes to missional pentecostal historiography through bringing a pre-eminent figure in early British Pentecostalism into the limelight. He shows how Pentecostalism in Belgian Congo was pioneered by W.F.P.Burton alongside local agency. Central to Burton’s contradictory and complex personality was a passionate desire to see the emancipation of humankind from the spiritual powers of darkness believing only Spirit-empowered local agency would enduringly prove effective.

Burton’s faith believed for Spirit intervention in church communities converting lives, bringing physical healing and transforming regions. In the maelstrom following Congolese Independence, Burton’s belief in his own brand of indigenisation made him an outlier even among Pentecostals. Burton’s pentecostal faith engendered an idealism which frustratingly conflicted with those not sharing it in the way he pursued it. This book thus serves Pentecostals and historians by clarifying Burton’s ideals and revealing the reasons for his frustrations.
Selected Papers from the 2019 Pretoria Congress and Consultation
Manichaeism and Early Christianity comprises the selected papers from the 2019 Pretoria Congress and Consultation. The sixteen chapters focus on where and how Gnostic Manichaeism interfered not only with other forms of Gnosticism, but above all with the writings and representatives of mainstream Christianity during the early centuries of our era. Key texts dealt with are a number of Nag Hammadi writings (including the Gospel of Thomas) as well as figures such as Marcion, Tatian, Ephrem the Syrian, Chrysostom, Pelagius and—not least—Augustine and his pupil Evodius.