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Artful Works and Dialogue about 'Art as Experience'
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Christina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
Using auto-ethnography as a methodological framework, this book captures two diametrical poles of the author’s experiences growing up poor and being educated in a colonial school system in a developing country and currently working as a university professor in the United States. The author begins by recollecting his mixed childhood and adolescence experiences, including being subjected to abject poverty, escaping a sexual predator as a teenager, witnessing class, gender, and sexual inequities, while at the same time being supported by family, neighbours, and friends in his community. Next, the author talks about the social class privileges that he has enjoyed as a result of becoming a university professor while juxtaposing such privileges to micro-aggression, systemic racism, xenophobia, linguicism, and elitism that he has been facing in society, including in the Ivy Halls of White America.
This edited book considers the main issues and controversies within the current educational context of inclusive education, from an international perspective. Authorities in the field such as Norwich, Kauffman, and Boyle, amongst many other international scholars, provide an enticing insight into many of the issues and controversies around inclusive education, and whether it is achievable or not. We have reached a point in time where inclusive education has been the prevailing doctrine for universal education policies. However, there are still many challenges facing those working within the inclusive education space, with some countries actually becoming less inclusive.

International and national legislation has continued to move towards inclusive education, yet there seems to be many gaps between the philosophy and the principles of inclusive education and systemic practice.

The book aims to address the current debates surrounding the implementation of inclusive education, and also offers insights into the inconsistencies between policies and practices in inclusive environments. Moreover, it analyzes contemporary research evidence on the effectiveness of inclusion and identify directions for future research.

Contributors are: Kelly-Ann Allen, Dimitris Anastasiou, Joanna Anderson, Adrian Ashman, Jeanmarie Badar, Christopher Boyle, Jonathan M. Campbell, Heather Craig, Leire Darretxe, Julian Elliott, Zuriñe Gaintza, Betty A. Hallenbeck, Divya Jindal-Snape, Marguerite Jones, James M. Kauffman, George Koutsouris, Fraser Lauchlan, Gerry Mac Ruairc, Sofia Mavropoulou, Daniel Mays, Brahm Norwich, Angela Page, Kirsten S. Railey, and Federico R. Waitoller.
A Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez
To expand the possibilities of "doing arts thinking" from a non-Eurocentric view, Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology: An Evolving Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez is grounded in Indigenous perspectives on arts practice, arts research, and art education. Mentored in painting for eighteen years by two Guatemalan Maya artists, Kryssi Staikidis, a North American painter and art education professor, uses both Indigenous and decolonizing methodologies, which involve respectful collaboration, and continuously reexamines her positions as student, artist, and ethnographer searching to redefine and transform the roles of the artist as mentor, historian/activist, ethnographer, and teacher.

The primary purpose of the book is to illuminate the Maya artists as mentors, the collaborative and holistic processes underlying their painting, and the teaching and insights from their studios. These include Imagined Realism, a process excluding rendering from observation, and the fusion of pedagogy and curriculum into a holistic paradigm of decentralized teaching, negotiated curriculum, personal and cultural narrative as thematic content, and the surrounding visual culture and community as text.

The Maya artist as cultural historian creates paintings as platforms of protest and vehicles of cultural transmission, for example, genocide witnessed in paintings as historical evidence. The mentored artist as ethnographer cedes the traditional ethnographic authority of the colonizing stance to the Indigenous expert as partner and mentor, and under this mentorship analyzes its possibilities as decolonizing arts-based qualitative inquiry. For the teacher, Maya world views broaden and integrate arts practice and arts research, inaugurating possibilities to transform arts education.

Abstract

Several paths may lead to our becoming our own worst enemy: (a) drawing especially clear and extreme lines, (b) neglecting or rejecting matters of judgment, (c) ignoring or downplaying the economic consequences of policy, (d) abjuring rationality and flirting with irrationality, (e) offering simple solutions to complex problems, (f) claiming moral superiority while ignoring competing moral and ethical principles, (g) demonizing dissenting views, (h) losing focus on what is most important, and (i) ignoring history. The full inclusion movement ignores these ways of being counterproductive in the pursuit of goals that are rigidly ideological. A counterproductive argument of the full inclusion movement is the ideology that the general education classroom must be made the only place where effective special education can be provided and that that place must the same for all students, including all those with disabilities. This makes place rather than appropriate education the most important issue. Partial inclusion, tempered by the realities of teaching and learning, is advisable to avoid catastrophic loss of a policy of inclusion of many students with disabilities in general education. Science, reason, and attention to history are better guides than are romanticism or insistence on a “pure” ideology free of nuance.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies
In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies
Author: Julian Elliott

Abstract

This chapter examines the nature of the dyslexia debate and its implications for the provision of inclusive education. While it might seem that a dyslexia industry that seeks to identify, assess, and intervene with struggling readers would help to ensure sound inclusive practice, in reality this unwittingly undermines the development and operation of inclusion. This chapter examines the many different ways that dyslexia is understood and operationalised, outlines key cognitive processes and explanatory causal theories, considers the role of intelligence, and concludes by demonstrating why categorical division between identified dyslexic and other poor readers is not scientifically meaningful. While dyslexia identification and resourcing may benefit those so labelled, large numbers of other struggling readers, disproportionately socially and economically disadvantaged, are often left without the support they also require. It is argued that a response to intervention model is a more effective approach to reading disability. This process identifies, and intervenes with, all struggling readers as early as possible. The nature and extent of resourcing are based upon the child’s response to additional educational instruction, rather than to a scientifically questionable diagnostic category. Such an approach, when operated effectively, targets the needs of everyone who struggles to learn to read and, thus, truly reflects an inclusive approach.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies

Abstract

In this chapter Anderson and Boyle provide a critical discussion on the notion of ‘good’ education by analysing how neo-liberalism has impacted education. Gert Biesta’s three-domain model of educational purpose guides their endeavour to disentangle the complexities of what it means to provide ‘good’ education that meets the needs of dynamic and diverse groups of students. They contend that current educational discourse evident in school policies, with its neo-liberal focus on an effective instruction, places a strong emphasis on evidence and practices to bring about measurable outcomes that produce winners and losers; a concept that is problematic as it detracts attention from questions such as “what are students learning?” and “why are they learning?” and “who are they learning it from?” These questions are integral to any interrogation of a socially just and ‘good’ education. The authors conclude that current debates around the construct of inclusive education afford an opportunity to ask the questions that need to be asked, and to challenge the neo-liberal agenda that has driven much of the educational reform of the past decade. To do so could shift the momentum towards fairness and equity in education.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies

Abstract

This chapter seeks to examine the work of school leaders in leading a difference-friendly school where assimilation to majority or dominant cultural norms is no longer the price of equal respect and recognition. A key focus here is an explication of the manner in which difference is understood and the manner in which this understanding is incorporated into the way we teach, the way we assess, the way we lead schools. In order to move towards a more inclusive school system, the chapter argues, that leaders need to take on board the multiplicative manifestations of the marginalization that are present for many groups of students. With this as a core driver of reform it is possible to begin to create schools that can avoid the current reproduced and sedimented patterns of system failure for some groups of students. Achieving an inclusive school system requires a radical shift in how we conceptualise schools and how we frame and develop leadership in these schools. Nurturing this type of leadership requires a move away from more normative models of leadership development because there are no easy answers or fool proof recipes. What is required is an intellectual engagement with a much more complex set of discourses and perspectives that reflect a recognition of a view of school leadership that is complex to its core. This is precisely because the core task of the formation of children and young people needs to be the defining imperative for all leadership practice in schools.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies

Abstract

Recognising the importance of teacher attitudes to inclusion is crucial for understanding the effectiveness of inclusive education in the school and/or community. It has been reported that teachers who are more positive to inclusion have more controlled learning environments compared to teachers with more negative attitudes to inclusion. The role of teachers is understated in many studies that have investigated inclusion and student experiences. It is important to understand the vital roles of teachers in fostering inclusive classrooms, and while inclusion in schools begins with the teachers, it is imperative that teachers themselves are supported by the education system through access to appropriate resources, and the provision of supportive leadership and effective policy.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies