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Volume Editors: Malcolm Baker and Inge Reist
Exploring the variety of forms taken by collections of sculpture, this volume presents new research by twelve internationally recognized scholars. The essays delve into the motivations of different collectors, the modes of display, and the aesthetics of viewing sculpture, bringing to light much new archival material. The book underscores the ambiguous nature of sculpture collections, variously understood as decorative components of interiors or gardens, as objects of desire in cabinets of curiosity, or as autonomous works of art in private and public collections. Emphasizing the collections and the ways in which these were viewed and described, this book addresses a significant but neglected aspect of art collecting and contributes to the literature on this branch of art and cultural history.
The Biography. Translated from German by Kelly Kawar an Sebastian Goth
Translators: Kelly Kawar and Sebastian Goth
In his great biography, Günter Blamberger draws a new Kleist: Unlike conventional approaches, he tries not to understand Kleist’s life from its end, from the perspective of suicide as the final catastrophe of an allegedly always crisis-ridden life. Rather, he remains at the height of Kleist’s presence; he narrates from Kleist’s awareness of the moment, showing the unsettling and astonishing in every phase of his life, the explosives in every one of Kleist’s risky biographical and literary experiments.
The result is a standard work of German literary history, a captivating and vivid biography of one of the greatest literary geniuses of all time, award-winning as the top title of 2011 in the field of humanities non-fiction and honored in Times Literary Supplement: „This new biography is certain to remain the definitive Life of Kleist for a generation”, in the FAZ: “Blamberger’s biography is so clever that other books about Kleist suddenly appear to be, if not stupid, then at least negligently under-complex”, in the SZ: “A Kleist Biography grandiose rich in perspectives” or in the Tagesspiegel: “Probably the best Kleist biography to date”.
Author: Jane Gilmer
The Alchemical Actor – Performing the Great Work: Imagining Alchemical Theatre offers an imagination for new theatre inspired by the directives of Antonin Artaud. The alchemical four elements – earth, water, air and fire and four alchemical stages – nigredo, albedo, citrino and rubedo perform initiatory steps in the practice of alchemical transformational consciousness. The depth psychological work of Carl G. Jung, theatre techniques of Michael Chekhov, Rudolf Steiner, William Shakespeare and others compose this ‘Great Work’. Jane Gilmer conjures the magical unknown leading the reader through material cognition towards gold-making heart-thinking - key to new and future theatre.
Author: Piero Boitani
Anagnorisis has been called ‘one of the great works of comparative literary criticism of our time’ is a book that spans the millennia, the adventures of Ulysses in Homer and God’s mysterious appearance to Abraham in Genesis, down not only to Joyce’s Ulysses and Thomas Mann’s Joseph and his Brothers, but also to Borges’s ‘The Immortal’ and Derek Walcott Omeros.
‘Anagnorisis’ means ‘recognition’. Aristotle defined it simply as ‘the passage from ignorance to knowledge’. But the knowledge one gains in anagnorisis is neither scientific nor abstract – it is living knowledge in the flesh, as Euripides’ Helen understood when, seeing her husband again after many years, she exclaimed: ‘to recognize those we love is a god.
Editors: Meir Hatina and Yona Scheffer
Cultural Pearls from the East offers fascinating insights into Muslim-Arab culture and the evolution of its intellectual nature and literary texts from early Islam to modern times. The textual analysis of largely unexplored literary works and chronicles that epitomize this volume highlight the affinity between culture, society, and politics, exploring these issues from both thematic and comparative perspectives. Among the topics examined in depth: Arabic poetry of warfare at the dawn of Islam; medieval poems about venerated sites and saints; Ottoman and Egyptian chronicles portraying the socioreligious landscapes of Egypt and the Fertile Crescent under the Ottoman Empire and in the shadow of growing European encroachment; and Arab-Jewish literature dealing with suppression, exile, and identity.

Contributors: Ghaleb Anabseh, Albert Arazi, Meir M. Bar-Asher, Peter Chelkowski, Geula Elimelekh, Sigal Goorj, Jane Hathaway, Meir Hatina, Yair Huri-Horesh, Amir Lerner, Menachem Milson, Gabriel M. Rosenbaum, Joseph Sadan, Yona Sheffer, Norman (Noam) A. Stillman, Ibrahim Taha, Michael Winter, Eman Younis
This book offers a survey of the constitution of the French memoir tradition, and explores in detail the works of four representative authors: Philippe de Commynes, Louise de Savoie, Philippe de Cheverny, and François de Bassompierre. Works of self-writing were usually printed under the title of “memoirs” and have been often considered a uniform genre. These early forms of self-writing were in fact highly heterogenous works at the crossroads of multiple genres, from the account book to the astrological diary. Their writing, printing, and circulation challenge modern notions of autobiographical genres: their authorship is often questionable and collective, and they tended to be compiled in large collections for political ends, without regard to the authors’ intention.
Latin-German Pharmaceutical Glossaries in Hebrew Characters extant in Ms Leiden Universiteitsbibliotheek, Cod. Or. 4732/1 (SCAL 15), fols. 1a–17b
With A Glimpse into Medical Practice among Jews around 1500: Latin-German Pharmaceutical Glossaries in Hebrew Characters extant in Ms Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, Cod. Or. 4732/1 (SCAL 15), fols. 1a–17b, Gerrit Bos and Klaus-Dietrich Fischer present an edition of two unique medieval lists of medico-botanical terms in Latin and German, written in Hebrew characters. Jewish physicians probably used these kinds of lists for the acquisition of pharmaceuticals they needed for the preparation of medicines. The edition with a total of 568 entries features transcriptions from the Hebrew, tables and indexes of the analysed terms in a regularized form, and a facsimile of the Leiden manuscript.

Many of the German plant names featuing in the edition are not listed in the otherwise monumental reference work Wörterbuch der deutschen Pflanzennamen ( Dictionary of German Plant Names) by the German botanist Heinrich Marzell. This testifies to the value of these glossaries for further research. It is also useful to see which Latin forms were in current use at the time of creation of the edition.
In this volume, seventeen scholars from Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, and Slovakia present their research on the formation and transformation of national literary canons as a practice of nation-building in Central Europe and the Baltics.The articles focus on the shaping of national identities through literature and analyze the establishment of literary canons by means of language, the role of national poets, and similar topics. Case studies of so-called minor literatures reveal common tendencies in the structure of many national canons, as well as specific responses and creative decisions in nation-building processes. This volume rethinks the relations between literature and nationalism (from the 19th century to present times) and contributes to the field of studies of historical development of nationalism.

Contributors are: Aistė Kučinskienė, Anna R. Burzyńska, Brigita Speičytė, Gergely Fórizs, Helena Markowska-Fulara, Jagoda Wierzejska, Judit Dobry, Jurga Sadauskienė, Katre Kikas, Krystyna Zabawa, Olga Bartosiewicz-Nikolaev, Paweł Bukowiec, Ramunė Bleizgienė, Radosław Okulicz-Kozaryn, Renata Beličová, Vaidas Šeferis, and Viktorija Šeina.
In Mobilities and Cosmopolitanisms in African and Afrodiasporic Literatures, Anna-Leena Toivanen explores the representations and relationship of mobilities and cosmopolitanisms in Franco- and Anglophone African and Afrodiasporic literary texts from the 1990s to the 2010s. Representations of mobility practices are discussed against three categories of cosmopolitanism reflecting the privileged, pragmatic, and critical aspects of the concept.
The main scientific contribution of Toivanen’s book is enhancing dialogue between postcolonial literary studies and mobilities research. The book criticises reductive understandings of ‘mobility’ as a synonym for migration, and problematizes frequently made links between mobility and cosmopolitanism. Mobilities and Cosmopolitanisms adopts a comparative approach to Franco- and Anglophone African and Afrodiasporic literatures, often discussed separately despite their common themes and parallel paths.