Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,916 items for :

  • Philosophy of Religion x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All
Author: Mirella Klomp
In what is often considered ‘a society “after God”’, millions of Dutch participate annually in a public multi-media performance of Christ's Passion. What to make of this paradox? In Playing On: Re-staging the Passion after the Death of God, Mirella Klomp offers a theological analysis of this performance and those involved in it. Working in an interdisciplinary fashion and utilizing creative interludes, she demonstrates how precisely this production of Jesus' last hours carves out a new and unexpected space for God in a (post-)secular culture. Klomp argues compellingly that understanding God's presence in the Western world requires looking beyond the church and at the public domain; that is the future of practical theology. She lays out this agenda for practical theology by showing how the Dutch playfully rediscover Christian tradition, and – perhaps – even God.
Volume Editors: Phil Shining and Nicol Michelle Epple
The wide spectrum of links and interrelations found amongst the diversity of human sexual expressions and spiritual practices around the world constitutes one of the most fruitful grounds of scholarly research today. Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality introduces an emerging academic field of studies focused on the multiplicity of problematizations intersecting spirituality and sexuality, from eroticism and ecstasy embodiments to inner spiritual cultivation, intimate relationships, sex education, and gender empowerment. This collection of essays addresses subjects such as prehistoric art, Queer Theology, BDSM, Tantra, the Song of Songs, ‘la petite mort’, asceticism, feminist performative protests, and sexually charged landscapes, among others. Through varied methodologies and state-of-the-art interdisciplinary approaches, this volume becomes highly useful for readers engaged in the integration of scholarly and practical knowledge.
Early Psychoanalytic Religious Writings presents, in one edited volume, many of the foundational writings in the psychoanalytic study of religion. These translated works by Abraham, Fromm, Pfister, and others, complement Freud’s seminal contributions and provide a unique window into the origins of psychoanalytic thinking. The volume includes the Freud-Pfister correspondence, with a brief introduction, which reveals the rich back story of friendship, mutual respect, and intellectual debate. These essays are anchored in Freud’s early theory-building and prefigure and are linked to later developments in psychoanalytic thought. The issues raised in these essays are of relevance still today – how is religions thinking shaped by unconscious processes reflecting primary relationships and drives?

Abstract

The rituals of domination and submission, sadism and masochism, are a decadent, shocking and extraordinary form of theatre. The habitué of sadomasochistic (sm) sex is a skilled technician, a professional performer, an expert choreographer and a costumer. In this Theatre of Cruelty, pleasure is not considered in relation to what is permitted and prohibited, evaluated in terms of efficacy or utility, or secreted by identity. Bataille eulogized the power and intensity of sexual experience, its capacity to drive individuals beyond dualisms: joy and horror, subject and object, pleasure and pain. It is in this place of frenzied bewilderment that the subject encounters limits—the limit of reality, of reason, of normativity, of doxa. De-subjugation and self-making happen simultaneously in what must be a radical limit-experience in so far as sm events can be unmediated and are capable of displacing and transfiguring the subject. Identity becomes ‘other’ than itself. This dazzling space where one may explore diverse possibilities of corporeality, being and thought is analysed in relation to Foucault’s genealogy of the modern sexual subject and the new possibilities for a radical sexual politics set against the prevailing forms of normative subjectivity.

In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality
In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality
Author: Phil Shining

Abstract

This article is an attempt to study the problem of ‘the little death’ in all its depth and complexity. The subject will be approached through an empirical-constructivist model of interdisciplinary research on sexual trance and ecstasy, tracking the nucleus of convergence between scientific, philosophic, artistic, and religious sources, plus testimonies of empirical experimentation. Continuities and discontinuities are traced between Eastern and Western heterogeneous forms of knowledge, like the practices of ancient spiritual traditions, avant-garde poetry, post-structuralist philosophy, and neurophysiological models of explanation. It is proposed that the expression la petite mort functions as a highly accurate description of the neurophysiological core of the sexual trance embodiments, of trance in general, and of all mystical experiences in general. Orgasm and the embodiment of sexual trance are contrasted with three key problems: selflessness, death, and absolute ultimate reality. The article concludes by outlining a new, immanent model of empirically grounded mystical experience.

In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality

Abstract

This article makes a bold claim, that Christians can come to ‘know’ God more deeply and intimately by embracing the connection between spirituality and sexuality. I show that key passages in the Song of Songs reveal God’s intent and emphasis on the joy and ecstasy of love, showing sex is used—and was created by God—as a metaphor for His desired intimacy with His believers. Yet, contemporary Christian discourses generally ignore the topic of sexuality or, worse, denigrate it as immoral and impure. I offer a counterpoint to this traditional view by discussing how Christians can experience holistic sensual encounters with Jesus Christ through God’s Spirit. Building on scriptural evidence of this intimacy between believers and God, I then situate such experiences historically using testimony of medieval mystics and contemporary Christian spirituals. The analysis of scripture is grounded on a hermeneutic approach, contrasted with complementary phenomenological analysis. I conclude by discussing how the act of bodily worship through song can facilitate an intimate spiritual experience akin to sexual orgasm, unpacking this through a brief delineation of the structure of contemporary Christian worship music and the sensual auditory affectation derived from this experience.

In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality

Abstract

The Holy Rebellious Pussy Procession has significantly aroused the conflict around the ways in which sexuality and the conceptions of what is sacred are expressed. While feminist women think their own genitals are sacred, some Christian sectors assume this conception as harmful against the respect for the traditions and popular beliefs. For the Spanish Feminist Movement—official since 1983 with the setting up of the Woman’s Institute in Spain—the government’s initiative of reforming the Abortion Act in 2013 strengthens inter-generational ties, consolidating a coalition known as ‘Freedom Train’, with proposals linked to the 15M and other alternative politics movements. In this context, the protests of a group of Andalusian women in Malaga and Sevilla with their Rebellious Pussy’s brotherhood provides new insights and conceptions about the hegemonic view of sexuality and spirituality. The aims of this paper are: firstly, to review the arguments classified in a socio-cultural context such as the Andalusian, in which Holy Week is deeply felt; secondly, to analyse the ways in which these opposed mindsets have been placed; thirdly, to specify the social consequences of this confrontation for both positions.

In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality
Author: Huai Bao

Abstract

In Mainland China modern spirituality is informed by a blend of Buddhism and other religions, as well as humanistic psychology. Drawing on in-depth interviews with individuals in China who claim to be ‘spiritual’ and/or who identify themselves as religious, this study examines and interrogates the (in)compatibility between spirituality and sexuality in presenting and negotiating a diversity of opinions over topics traditionally perceived as taboo. From the hegemonic perspective spirituality can hardly be linked to sexuality as complementing one another due to the common belief that the latter disturbs the former. Even while interviewees tend to defend their personal belief, following or taking distance from the hegemonic perspective, this study is not aimed at forming a conclusive argument favouring one particular point of view, but instead analyses the complexity of exploring the interrelatedness between spirituality and sexuality in the lived experiences of contemporary China.

In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality
In: Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality