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New digital technologies offer many exciting opportunities to educators who are looking to develop better teaching practices. When technologies are new, however, the potential for beneficial and effective implementations and applications is not yet fully recognized. This book is intended to provide teachers and researchers with a wide range of ideas from researchers working to integrate the new technology of Augmented Reality into educational settings and processes. It is hoped that the research and theory presented here can support both teachers and researchers in future work with this exciting new technology.

Contributors are: Miriam Adamková, Gilles Aldon, Panayiota Anastasi, Ferdinando Arzarello, Martina Babinská, Robert Bohdal, Francisco Botana, Constadina Charalambous, Eva Csandova, Omer Deperlioglu, Monika Dillingerová, Christos Dimopoulos, Jiri Dostal, Jihad El-Sana, Michael N. Fried, Maria Fuchsová, Marianthi Grizioti, Tomas Hlava, Markus Hohenwarter, Kateřina Jančaříková, Konstantinos Katzis, Lilla Korenova, Utku Köse, Zoltán Kovács,Blanka Kožík Lehotayová, Maria Kožuchová, Chronis Kynigos, Ilona-Elefteryja Lasica, Zsolt Lavicza, Álvaro Martínez, Efstathios Mavrotheris, Katerina Mavrou, Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Georgios Papaioannou, Miroslava Pirháčová Lapšanská, Stavros Pitsikalis, Corinne Raffin, Tomás Recio, Cristina Sabena, Florian Schacht, Eva Severini, Martina Siposova, Zacharoula Smyrnaiou, Nayia Stylianidou, Osama Swidan, Christos Tiniakos, Melanie Tomaschko, Renata Tothova, Christina Vasou, and Ibolya Veress-Bágyi.
The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education
Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.
The transformative power of education is widely recognised. Yet, harnessing the transformative power of education is complex for exactly those people and communities who would benefit the most. Much scholarship is available describing the ways in which educational access, opportunity and outcomes are unequally distributed; and much scholarship is dedicated to analysing and critiquing the ‘problems’ of education.

This volume gratefully builds on such analysis, to take a more constructive stance: examining how to better enable education to fulfil its promise of transforming lives.

Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education returns overall to a broader language of educational change rather than reduce our sense of scale and scope of ‘transformation’ to what might be measured in or by schools. It offers a series of practical, local but system wide and socially responsible practices, policies and analyses to support the ways that education can work at its best. The projects described here vary in scale and scope but are rooted in a wider sense of community and social responsibility so that education is considered as a necessary sustainable process to ensure productive futures for all.

Its contributors include not only scholars, but also professional experts and young people. The book’s aim is to share and advance authentic possibilities for enabling all children and young people to flourish through the transformative power of education.

Abstract

Teachers who work in alternative education environments in Australia are often motivated by a desire to make a difference and to change educational trajectories and work opportunities for young people. Relationships, between staff and with young people, are considered to be vital in this process. However, teachers in flexible learning environments have reported a high level of individual focus amongst students, where young people think that learning is all about me [them], and their successful reengagement in education is determined by their own motivation and actions. Recent findings indicate a different picture, where young people acknowledge the team project that surrounds them in Flexible Learning Programs. In this paper we draw on the findings from a wellbeing project conducted with staff and students in Edmund Rice Education Australia Youth+ Flexible Learning Centres to investigate staff and student perceptions of relationships, and their acknowledgement of the group project required to re-engage young people in education.

In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education

Abstract

What do children in Australia value about their communities? How are communities supporting children? How are communities failing them – and why? Over the past fifteen years, across Australia, at all levels, governments have been concerned with strengthening communities as part of a policy shift towards ‘local solutions to local problems’ and to place-based initiatives. As part of this shift, there has been considerable focus on how communities can be ‘child-friendly.’ Much has been done to create communities that are inclusive of children, but much remains to be done.

Based on research with over 100 children across six urban communities in eastern Australia, this chapter explores what a child-inclusive community is from a child standpoint: a vision of communities as safe, inclusive and respectful. This vision was contradicted by the reality experienced by many children, whereby exclusion and insecurity were most commonly experienced. How can we reshape communities, drawing on a child standpoint? How can we bridge the gap between children’s vision of strong, supportive communities and the very different realities faced by many children? This chapter suggests that listening to, and taking seriously, children’s priorities and experiences is the starting point for creating strong and supportive communities.

In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education
In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education

Abstract

A challenge by Tom Bentley to embrace and harness collaboration as a means to creating the next wave of big gains in education planted a seed in the fertile soil of a couple of art teacher minds. The challenge to permeate boundaries and draw together external expertise to co-evolve a ‘many to many’ reciprocal relationship for teacher professional learning for art teachers became our vision. We devised a question; how can partnerships between schools, universities and other stakeholders be strengthened to support teachers in their implementation of The Australian Curriculum: The Arts?

Armed with this question and a curiosity to explore Bentley’s seven key features of collaboration, we set about assembling a group of contributors, with whom we then pushed the boundaries and thresholds of what we might collectively do to support art teachers in their enactment of the curriculum. Arts education volunteers and advocates, early career and senior academics, professional learning organisations, and arts classroom specialists working at the coal-face poured their collective energies and resources in to the shared ambition of supporting each other towards successful transformation of practice.

In our chapter, we share our perspective of navigating the professional learning partnership landscape, and reflect upon our experience of engaging with Bentley’s seven key features of collaboration as a model for cultivating professional learning partnerships.

In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education
In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education

Abstract

Partnerships, collaborations and networks have been identified as enablers of opportunity, community connectedness, resources and growth and sustainability. Although the vital importance of partnerships is commonly acknowledged amongst alternative/flexible learning programs and providers, currently it is an under-researched theme.

Flexible and Inclusive Learning Providers have established themselves as a vehicle to assist marginalised young people to transform their lives. The opportunity that partnerships offer FILPs as enablers of change, growth and broadening what they can offer young people is what transformative education and system change is all about.

This chapter aims to contextualise the Flexible and Inclusive Learning partnership agenda within the growth of the school, community, family and business partnership research platform. It also aims to outline the current knowledge of FILPs and their partnerships, leading to how this frames my current research approach and findings which has had its focus in regional Victoria, Australia.

In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education

Abstract

Using another example from the island state of Tasmania, this vignette foregrounds Part 2 by introducing one particular pedagogical strategy designed to engage and enable learning transformations in the classroom.

In: Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education