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Editor: Stephen Rowley
European Perceptions of China and Perspectives on the Belt and Road Initiative is a collection of fourteen essays on the way China is perceived in Europe today. These perceptions – and they are multiple – are particularly important to the People’s Republic of China as the country grapples with its increasingly prominent role on the international stage, and equally important to Europe as it attempts to come to terms with the technological, social and economic advances of the Belt and Road Initiative.

The authors are, on the whole, senior academics specializing in such topics as International Relations and Security, Public Diplomacy, Media and Cultural Studies, and Philosophy and Religion from more than a dozen different European countries and are involved in various international projects focussed on Europe-China relations.
Religious Orders and Their Schools in Early Modern Italy (1500–1800)
Author: David Salomoni
In Educating the Catholic People, David Salomoni reconstructs the complex educational landscape that arose in sixteenth-century Italy and lasted until the French Revolution. Over three centuries, various religious orders, both male and female, took on the educational needs of cities and states on the Italian peninsula, renewing the traditional humanist pedagogy. Historians, however, have not attempted to produce a synthesis on this topic, focusing mainly on the pedagogical activities of the Jesuits and neglecting the contributions and innovations of other groups. This book addresses this historiographical gap, providing a new chapter in the comparative study of pre-modern education.
Author: Mitch Bleier
Schooling, the most ubiquitous species of formal educational practice, removes learners from the world in which they exist and places them in contrived environments in order to educate them for the world in which they will work, play, and engage in other forms of cultural production for the rest of their time on Earth. While this arrangement seems to work for some, particularly those in academia and policymaking (who make decisions about educating others), it serves many of us somewhat less satisfactorily. This book documents the ongoing journey of a young cheese professional as she navigates the worlds of formal and informal education and the craft and art of cheesemaking. Her self-education is examined as she appropriates available resources in the service of constructing a professional learning program in the world and on the job. As she both succeeds and bumps up against obstacles in the pursuit of a life and a future in uncharted territory, we explore her being and becoming a professional cheesemaker, affineur and cheesemonger.
A parallel story of an emerging educational researcher is examined as he partners with the cheese professional, propelling both of their stories into uncharted territory.
Author: Nancy A. Wasser
“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many academic students claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, the author argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

The author explains how teaching and regular practicing of how to write from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in the U.S. curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to a more equal society in which both teachers and children have a voice.
Author: Augie Fleras
The multiculturalization of Canada has catapulted it into the front ranks of countries in advancing a principled diversity governance. Fifty years after the inception of a multicultural governance model that seemingly works and is relatively popular, Canada remains one of the few countries in the world to believe in multiculturalism. Yet the irony is inescapable: Notwithstanding its lofty status as a Canadian icon and an aspirational ideal, an official multiculturalism remains misunderstood both in Canada and abroad in terms of what it means, how it works and for whom, and why it endures. If anything, as the book explains, the idea of multiculturalism remains shrouded in the conceptual fog of a ‘riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma’. An interplay of polite fictions that mask inconvenient truths puts the onus on deconstructing Canadian multiculturalism by conceptualizing strengths (including a probe into why multiculturalism ostensibly works in Canada but rarely elsewhere), analyzing weaknesses, critically assessing its worth, and envisioning its future in responding to the new realities and demands of a post-multicultural world. That Canada’s multiculturalism remains a work in progress, albeit one with innovative possibilities, provides a fitting tribute.
Connecting Theory and Practice (4th Edition)
Authors: Wendy Patton and Mary McMahon
This fourth edition of the book represents a milestone in the history of the Systems Theory Framework that attests to its continuing influence and contemporary relevance. It emphasises changes in career development theory, practice, and research since its first edition in 1999. At that time, the publication of the STF was described by reviewers as a “groundbreaking departure from traditional counseling texts”, a “landmark work leading to the convergence of career development theories”, and as a “rare book that not only illuminates a field of study but also advances it”. Subsequent commentary attests to the strength of the metatheoretical contribution of the STF and its facilitation of links between theory, research, and practice. This book introduces systems theory and the STF, and comprehensively overviews traditional and contemporary career theory and analyses it through the metatheoretical lens of the STF. It then describes applications of the STF by applying systems thinking, systems mapping and experiential learning. Finally, the contributions and future directions of the STF are highlighted. This book provides a record of almost 30 years of contribution of the STF to the career theory, research, and practice field.
Volume Editor: JuliAnna Ávila
How would you implement Critical Digital Literacies in your own classrooms and educational programs?

You will find a valuable resource to answer that question in this volume, with a pronounced focus on social justice. Seventeen contributors advance the theories and praxis of Critical Digital Literacies. Aimed at literacy, teacher education, and English Education practitioners, this volume explores critical practices with digital tools. The chapters highlight activities and approaches which cross the boundaries of: genre; critical data literacy; materiality; critical self-reflection; preservice teacher education; gender; young adult literature; multimodal composition; assessment; gaming; podcasting; and second-language teacher education. Authors also explore the challenges of carrying out both the critical and the digital within the context and confines of traditional schooling.

Contributors are: Claire Ahn, JuliAnna Ávila, Alexander Bacalja, Lourdes Cardozo-Gaibisso, Edison Castrillón Angel, Elena Galdeano, Matthew Hall, Amber Jensen, Elisabeth Johnson, Raúl Alberto Mora, Luci Pangrazio, Ernesto Peña, Amy Piotrowski, Amanda Miller Plaizier, Holger Pötzsch, Mary Rice and Anna Smith.
Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators
Volume Editors: John H. Curry and Sean R. Jackson
Informal learning experiences drive many into the education realm. For some, the opportunity to coach young people in sports or other extra-curricular programs is what motivates them to get out of bed in the morning. It is in these contexts that young people acquire some of the lessons that have stood the tests of time in their memory, and formulated their being. It is these moments that we hope to capture and pass on through this collective work.
The Greatest Lecture I Was Never Taught: Leadership Lessons and Mentoring Moments from the Lives of Everyday Educators asks educators from all sectors (K12, Higher Education, Educational Administrators, Medical, Military, Coaching, etc.) to reflect on these moments and help us pass them on. Some took this as an opportunity to finally thank a mentor. Others presented information on what shaped their priorities; and still others just wanted to tell a story. Whatever their motivation, this collection should serve as an investigation on how the informal teaching moments are a leader’s and mentor’s greatest tool.