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Author: Jane Gilmer
The Alchemical Actor – Performing the Great Work: Imagining Alchemical Theatre offers an imagination for new theatre inspired by the directives of Antonin Artaud. The alchemical four elements – earth, water, air and fire and four alchemical stages – nigredo, albedo, citrino and rubedo perform initiatory steps in the practice of alchemical transformational consciousness. The depth psychological work of Carl G. Jung, theatre techniques of Michael Chekhov, Rudolf Steiner, William Shakespeare and others compose this ‘Great Work’. Jane Gilmer conjures the magical unknown leading the reader through material cognition towards gold-making heart-thinking - key to new and future theatre.
Completed shortly before her death in 2019, Tragedy and Philosophy is the sum of Agnes Heller’s reflections on European history and culture, seen through the prism of Europe’s two unique literary creations: tragedy and philosophy. Part 1 traces their parallel history from ancient Athens to rebirth in early modern London and Paris. Part 2 explores the interactions between post-metaphysical philosophy and post-tragic drama from the eighteenth through to the twentieth centuries. Heller’s perspective is post-Hegelian: the story of European culture can only be told from its end, the generalization of modernity across the globe. In this sense Part 3 is Heller’s farewell to the grand narrative of European history and culture as well as her own personal farewell to philosophy.
Variations on Racinian Excuses
Author: Edward Forman
This comparative literary study re-evaluates the reciprocal relationship between tragic drama and current approaches to guilt and extenuation. Focussing on Racine but ranging widely, it sheds original light on tragic archetypes (Phaedra, Oedipus, Clytemnestra, Medea and others) through the lenses of performance theory and modern attitudes towards blame.
Tragic drama and legal systems both aim to evaluate the merits of excuses provided on behalf of perpetrators of catastrophic acts. Edward Forman wittily and provocatively explores modern judicial concepts – diminished responsibility, provocation, trauma, ignorance, scapegoating – through the responses of characters in tragedy. Attention is paid to the way in which classical plays (ancient Greek and seventeenth-century French) have been re-interpreted in performance in the light of modern perceptions of human responsibility and helplessness.
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy
In: Guilt and Extenuation in Tragedy