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South Korea, Japan and the Search for a Peaceful Solution
Author: Nedžad Grabus
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers Slovenia and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Slovenian language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
Author: Maria Xiouri
In The Breach of a Treaty: State Responses in International Law, Maria Xiouri examines the relationship between responses to the breach of a treaty according to the law of treaties and the law of State responsibility, namely, between the termination of the treaty or the suspension of its operation and countermeasures. Based on extensive analysis of State practice, the relevant legal instruments, international case law and literature, the book critically examines the concept of responses to the breach of a treaty, their legal regime and their operation in practice. It focuses on suspension of the operation of a treaty and countermeasures, challenging the prevailing view that there is a clear distinction between them, and argues that the former has been effectively superseded by the latter.
Author: Robert Böttner
Enhanced Cooperation allows a group of Member States to use the EU’s competences and institutions to pursue a project within the Union’s framework that is binding only on the participating States while remaining an EU act. Introduced by the Amsterdam Treaty, this tool of flexible integration had not been used until 2010. In The Constitutional Framework for Enhanced Cooperation in EU Law, Robert Böttner analyses the primary-law framework of this flexibility tool. On the basis of profound literature review and against the background of recent Member State practice, the author redefines the constitutional rules of Enhanced Cooperation. He draws conclusions on this tool’s legal limits, but also its potential for European integration.
The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, in the 2019 volume, it centres on religious issues that have come before courts of law.
Part II contains reports on national and international developments.
Part III features book reviews introducing and critiquing new, relevant literature within the disciplines of the social sciences, humanities and law.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook is an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.
Author: Maciej Mikuła
In this volume, Maciej Mikuła analyses the extant texts of the Ius municipale Magdeburgense, the most important collection of Magdeburg Law in late medieval Poland. He discusses the different translation traditions of the collection; the application of Magdeburg Law in different cities; how differences between the versions could affect the application of the rights; and how the invention of printing influenced the principle of legal certainty. Mikuła ultimately shows that the differences between the texts not only influenced legal practice, but also bear out how complex the process was of the adaptation of Magdeburg Law.