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England’s Early Africa Companies and their Traders, 1618-1672
This book directs its main focus to the Guinea Company and its members, aiming to understand the genealogy of several major changes taking place in the English Atlantic and in the Anglo-Africa trade in the 17th century and beyond. Little focus has been directed at the companies that preceded the Royal African Company, launched in 1672, and through presenting the Guinea Company - the earliest of England’s chartered Africa companies, and its relationship with the influential men who became its members, the book questions the inevitability of the Atlantic reality of the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Through its members, the Guinea Company emerged as a purpose-built structure with the ability to weather a volatile trade undergoing fundamental change.
Xavier Cortada’s Images of Constitutional Rights
In May It Please the Court, artist Xavier Cortada portrays ten significant decisions by the Supreme Court of the United States that originated from people, places, and events in Florida. These cases cover the rights of criminal defendants, the rights of free speech and free exercise of religion, and the powers of states. In Painting Constitutional Law, scholars of constitutional law analyse the paintings and cases, describing the law surrounding the cases and discussing how Cortada captures these foundational decisions, their people, and their events on canvas. This book explores new connections between contemporary art and constitutional law.

Contributors are: Renée Ater, Mary Sue Backus, Kathleen A. Brady, Jenny E. Carroll, Erwin Chemerinsky, Xavier Cortada, Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, Leslie Kendrick, Corinna Barrett Lain, Paul Marcus, Linda C. McClain, M.C. Mirow, James E. Pfander, Laura S. Underkuffler, and Howard M. Wasserman.
Editors: Boris Barth and Rolf Hobson
Ecuador’s “Good Living”: Crises, Discourse, and Law by Gallegos Anda, presents a critical approach towards the concept of Buen Vivir that was included in Ecuador’s 2008 Constitution. Due to its apparent legal novelty, this normative formula received much praise from multiple civil society and academic circles by forging what some argued to be a new development paradigm based on Andean epistemologies. Gallegos Anda theorizes this important phenomenon through an inductive analysis of context and power relations. Through a masterful navigation through epistemological fields, the author offers a critical theory of Buen Vivir that focuses on changing citizenship regimes, a retreating state, politicised ethnic cleavages, discursive democracy and the emergence of an empty signifier. Gallegos-Anda is the first to situate Buen Vivir in a theoretical context grounded in international human rights law.
This volume critically examines gender inequality, its origins, and its social and economic implications in Latin America, with a particular focus on Ecuador. For that purpose, Pablo Quiñonez and Claudia Maldonado-Erazo bring together a collection of articles that provide insights from different disciplines, including political economy, history, development studies, political science, microeconomics, and macroeconomics.

In Ecuador, as in Latin America as a whole, women dedicate more time than men to unpaid activities while being discriminated against in multiple areas, including labor markets, politics, and access to high-ranking positions. Furthermore, these problems are even greater for women from rural areas and ethnic minorities.

Contributors include: Rafael Alvarado, María Anchundia Places, Esteban Arévalo, Diana Cabrera Montecé, Edwin Espinoza Piguave, Gabriela Gallardo, Danny Granda, Claudia Maldonado-Erazo, Wendy Mora, Diana Morán Chiquito, Sayonara Morejón, Carlos Moreno-Hurtado, María Moreno Zea, Ana Oña Macías, Pablo Ponce, Pablo Quiñonez, Valeria Recalde, Josefina Rosales, Ximena Songor-Jaramillo, and Daniel Zea
Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology
In Introduction to Africana Demography: Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology scholars from across the country wed Black Sociology with critical demography within an Africana Demography framework. Contributors speak to innovative ways to address pressing issues and have the added benefit of affording many of the scholars denied their rightful place in the sociological and demographic canons. Specifically, the book includes an introduction outlining Africana demography and chapters that provide a critique of conventional demographic approaches to understanding race and social institutions, such as the family, religion, and the criminal justice system.


Contributors include: Lori Latrice Martin, Anthony Hill, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Maretta McDonald, Weldon McWilliams, Jack S. Monell, Edward Muhammad, Brianne Painia, Tifanie Pulley, David I. Rudder, Jas M. Sullivan, Arthur Whaley, and Deadric Williams.
Economic Interests and Political Decision-Making in the History of Dutch Brazil, 1621-1656
In Lobbying in Company, Joris van den Tol argues that people made a difference in the Dutch West India Company colony in Brazil (1630-1654). Through a combination of petitions, personal relations, and public opinion, individuals were able to exercise influence on the decision-making process regarding Dutch Brazil. His thorough analysis of these different elements offers a new perspective on the Atlantic and the Dutch Republic in the 17th century as well as a better understanding of lobbying in the Early Modern period. It was not the organizational structure that decided success and failure, but it was the people that made a difference.