Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 37 items for :

  • Japanese Art x
  • Primary Language: eng x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Journal of Japonisme
Free access
In: Journal of Japonisme
Author: Elizabeth Emery

Abstract

This article extends the conclusions of “A Japoniste Friendship in Translation: Hayashi Tadamasa and Philippe Burty (1878–1890)” (Journal of Japonisme, 6:1, 2021), an essay dedicated to the translation and analysis of a set of French letters documenting the friendship between Hayashi Tadamasa and Philippe Burty. The present article focuses on a second set of letters sent from Hayashi to Burty while on a trip to the United States in 1887 during which he sold fourteen French paintings for Burty. Hayashi’s descriptions of transatlantic voyages, the tastes and practices of American clients, and his personal reflections on travel, religion, and the tensions among French and American japonistes provide valuable insights into his character, the art market, and the social and aesthetic situation of Japonisme in 1887.

Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme
Author: Akiko Takesue

Abstract

This essay was developed while translating the article by Matsuo Tomoko, Senior Curator at the Chiba City Museum of Art which was originally published in 2001 (see Appendix). While Matsuo’s article focuses on the historiography of netsuke in Japan, this essay discusses the historical reception of this form of art in the West from the mid-nineteenth century to the turn of the twenty-first century. It is hoped that the essay and the translation together provide a critical perception on netsuke, which has rarely been discussed within the narrative of Japanese art history.

Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme
Author: Karen Schneider

Abstract

Katharine Nash Rhoades, a painter, Charles Lang Freer’s assistant, and a member of the Stieglitz Circle, met Freer at Mount Kisco, New York, the country home of Asian art collectors Agnes and Eugene Meyer on June 29, 1913. Their friendship lasted until Freer’s death on September 25, 1919. Although their relationship was relatively short in duration, it was characterized by loyalty, warmth, and mutual respect. Rhoades and Freer shared the pursuit of beauty as the guiding principle in their lives. Rhoades’s paintings reveal the influence that the Japanese art in Freer’s collection had upon her work. She was instrumental in the creation of the Freer Gallery of Art as it is known today. This article, based on extensive research using primary sources, sheds new light on the relationship between Katharine Rhoades and Charles Lang Freer and the ways in which the art of Japan played a key role in their lives.

Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century, Catalonia witnessed an exponential increase in the use of and predilection for the designs and aesthetic characteristics of Japanese art in the design of stained glass. At the time, oriental forms were received with enthusiasm, which resulted in the development of production of artistic stained glass, inspired by these new models.

This article focuses on the different ways in which Japanese-based designs made their way from Japan to the stained glass workshops of Catalonia, where they were transformed into spectacular pieces, some of which are still preserved today. In addition, the article examines how stained glass makers assimilated the aesthetics and compositional concepts of Japanese art and made them their own, adapting them to their needs while creating innovative stained glass that helped them to, paradoxically, converge with the medieval stained glass on which they were based.

Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme
Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

George Hendrik Breitner (1857–1923) was a Dutch Realist artist, whose works chronicle urban life in Amsterdam. But his paintings of a young woman, collapsed on a divan and wrapped in a luxuriant kimono, secured his reputation as an exponent of European Japonisme. The so-called ‘Kimono Girls’, completed between 1893 and 1896, are compelling evocations of female leisure, subsumed within an exotic melange of vivid color and pattern. More importantly, they are an amalgamation of several cultural contexts that characterized the volatile nineteenth century. European Japonisme, the revival of Dutch painterly traditions, medical dogma, and the beginnings of organized feminism come together in these works, making them both compelling and subversive.

Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

The essay traces the role of Marie Nordlinger (1876-1961) against her ties with Siegfried Bing, Marcel Bing, Marcel Proust and Charles Lang Freer. Nordlinger first worked in the ateliers of art nouveau later becoming a confidante of the Bings who helped sell Japanese prints in the United States especially to Charles Lang Freer when she visited the country.

Full Access
In: Journal of Japonisme