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Abstract

This article focuses on how the digital age has affected the Crimean Tatar religious authorities in the emerging cyber-Islamic environment. I argue that despite government restrictions, the internet remains a safe space for public debate and for challenging Muslim authorities in Crimea. I also argue that although online media have allowed traditional Muslim authorities in Crimea to improve communication within their organization and expand their audiences, they have become a platform for challenging their hierarchies, structures, ideologies, and texts. First, the structure of the Crimean Muslim community is outlined. I then describe the Crimean cyber-Islamic environment, before using social-media analysis and interviews with Muslim leaders to analyze the situation in the Crimean Tatars’ cyber-Islamic environment, with a focus on their religious authorities.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe

Abstract

While the prominence of neuroscience and neurotechnologies has generated intensive debates about the normative analysis of the ethical-legal challenges in public opinion and academia, these debates are relatively scarce among law and religion experts. To overcome the shortfall, this contribution describes the impact of the main neuroscientific applications on the right of freedom of thought, conscience, and religion. Considering how neurosciences techniques can alter the mind, decode thoughts, and enhance cognitive functions, particularly individual thought and conscience, I suggest revising the traditional dichotomy of forum internum and forum externum of the right to freedom of thought, conscience, and religion and rethinking the protection of the forum internum, which is at risk in the Age of Neuroscience.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe
In: Journal of Religion in Europe

Abstract

This article discusses how the visual and embodied storytelling methods of the theater may be used in the formation of Islamic knowledge. Examining productions staged by young women in Oslo in the tradition of the Twelver Shia theater, taʿziyeh/shabih, during commemorative rituals, I ask: How did producers and actors perceive theater to generate knowledge? How were visual and embodied storytelling methods used in conveying religious knowledge? What kind of knowledge was generated? Inspired by theater theory and post-structuralist semiotics, the analysis shows that the theater had transformative qualities that could contribute to cultural transmission, education, and moral and spiritual development. Knowledge was produced through sensorial communication, thinking, and understanding, and was held to emerge from the spectators’ and actors’ aesthetic and affective experiences, in addition to their abilities to create emotional relations with holy protagonists and the divine. The learning outcome was therefore presented as open-ended and invited young spectators and actors to take responsibility and reflect on how to act and respond in our time.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe
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Abstract

In John 20:11–18, Mary Magdalene meets Jesus after his death. She turns around twice, a double gesture that has puzzled New Testament scholars. In this article, I offer a performative reading of Mary Magdalene’s turns based on Judith Butler’s theory of gesture and the literary inventory of ancient recognition scenes. I argue that the double gesture does not emphasize the difference between a physical and an inner status of recognition. Instead, it is conceived as a non-identical repetition or quotation. It points to other turnings and other duplicities. Both turns are part of a performative process that unfolds the new identities of the main characters after their separation. Mary is not portrayed as a misunderstanding disciple who needs two turns to recognize Jesus, but as part of a reciprocal process that mirrors Jesus’ double appearance and the text’s double layers of meaning.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

The study transcends borders to challenge conventional narratives about religious tolerance and fundamentalism. Leveraging a Fuzzy-Hybrid Approach, we delve into the multifaceted realities of eight diverse nations: Germany, Cyprus, the United States, Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, Turkey, and Kenya. Our innovative analysis unveils surprising complexities, shattering stereotypes and painting a nuanced picture of religious beliefs. Germany emerges as a beacon of tolerance, boasting the highest tolerance levels with the lowest fundamentalism. However, the stark reality for citizens of Lebanon, Kenya, and Palestine reveals a landscape of lower tolerance and higher fundamentalism. This study delves deeper, using quantile regression models to expose the intricate interplay between religious tolerance, individual socioeconomic factors like education and religious discrimination, and even views on the death penalty. Our findings challenge simplistic assumptions, revealing intricate relationships between tolerance and fundamentalism across diverse contexts.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

This study delves into triggers and transformative effects of exceptional experiences among Camino de Santiago pilgrims. Analyzing 32 travelogues, we identify triggers like exposure to natural beauty and visits to sacred sites, leading to emotional shifts characterized by heightened unity and love. These experiences influence moral and cognitive frameworks, fostering heightened spirituality, wisdom, and detachment. “Experience of deep calm and reconciliation” improves relationships, “Experience of interconnectedness” enhances intuition in decision-making, and “Cathartic experiences” encourage vulnerability expression, fostering connection. Supported by a survey of 501 pilgrims, our findings highlight the frequency and transformative impact of these experiences on a diverse pilgrim population.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society