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Abstract

Pentecostalism has always struggled to define itself theologically from the beginning. Starting out as a marginal stream within Christianity, early Pentecostals were reluctant to compose statements of faith and were susceptible to a range of new doctrines, a problem that continues to this day. In this article, the author surveys the theological development of Pentecostalism in Australia, giving special attention to a specific Australian-born movement, Christian Revival Crusade, because of its distinctive doctrines of British-Israelism and deliverance of believers from evil spirits. The author concludes with some observations of recent doctrinal developments in Australian Pentecostalism before positing some causes for such changes and drawing some lessons for Pentecostalism as a whole.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
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Abstract

Several authors have recently argued that the Reformed doctrine of providence poses particular problems of evil that are intractable. How can one hold to a robust, Reformed doctrine of providence without either making God the author of evil or turning God into a Machiavellian tyrant? In this paper, I outline a model of providence I call “Beatific Governance”, in which God ordains and directs all that comes to pass unto the display of his beauty in all things without being the author of evil; and he does so, I argue, without violating an agent-causal view of freedom. I then resource this model to address several formulations of the problem of evil.

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Free access
In: Journal of Reformed Theology
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Abstract

Two incompatible trends have characterized contemporary systematic theological work. On the one hand, consistency with the broad Christian tradition has grown as a methodological desideratum, especially through the work of theological retrieval. On the other hand, theologians who turn their attention to gender maintain that it cannot look to Christian history for salutary resources. Can a theologian interested in giving an account of gender utilize the recognizable virtues of systematic theology? This article argues that it is possible. By retrieving doctrines that implicate gender, a theologian can be both catholic and sensitive to the right inheritance of the Christian tradition.

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
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Abstract

Recent attention has turned to Herman Bavinck’s discussion of theosis, with some arguing that he supported such a theology. I will challenge this, arguing instead that he misunderstood the nature of deification and rejected it on false grounds. Bavinck’s objections to theosis will be addressed to show how a Reformed doctrine of theosis can avoid the sorts of dualistic mysticism Bavinck rightly opposed. Bavinck’s criticisms of theosis are brought into dialogue with Thomas F. Torrance’s endorsement of theosis to see why Bavinck could not endorse a doctrine of theosis even if the mysticism he opposed were removed.

Open Access
In: Journal of Reformed Theology
In: Journal of Reformed Theology