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Abstract

This introduction situates the discussion of emotion and selfhood in medieval literature in a critical and cultural context, addressing its relevance for postmedieval readers and scholars. It addresses concepts such as performativity, selfhood and emotionality and their importance for the understanding of medieval literature. It furthermore elaborates on the rationale of the special issue and its scope, which extends across Scandinavia, Germany, Britain, Northern France, Flanders and the Netherlands. Finally, it proposes that the literary representation of selfhood is intimately interlinked with emotionality and the staging of literary emotions and introduces a broad range of essays to test this hypothesis across multiple cultural realms, generic forms and literary traditions.

Open Access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
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Abstract

This afterword sums up and responds to the articles in the special issue. It notes the variety in representations of the textual self and its constitution through emotion across medieval Northern Europe; representations which nevertheless depend on an imagined body. It also calls attention to the development of ideas of subjectivity and interiority and the ways in which literary experimentation drives social change, ending with a plea to reconsider the association of the medieval period with violence.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Free access
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Free access
In: Journal of the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists
Free access
In: Poetica
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Abstract

Adopting as theoretical framework Edmund Husserl’s ideas on memory and phantasms and the Derridean notion of ‘hauntology’, this article focuses on the spectral protagonist of Samuel Beckett’s “The Calmative” and on the tangle of memories he recounts from his bed of frozen stone. Resembling Dante’s pilgrimage in the underworld and the excruciating experience of soldiers in trenches, this novella presents a ghostly narrator that, persecuted by the rotting of his corpse and by the trauma of memory, is condemned to an indefinable state of deathlessness-in-death, in which he can only ‘revive’ the everlasting reminiscence of his own demise.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies
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Abstract

How does patriarchy affect one’s conception of personal freedom? Patriarchy raises this existential question, not just for women but for other identities such as marginalized men. Using Simone de Beauvoir’s thoughts on patriarchy and existentialism, the author argues that an existential framework for patriarchy gives greater insight into the ways patriarchy is interconnected with other oppressions, affects marginalized men and others who do not identify as women, and alters people’s conception of choice as they engage the world.

In: Simone de Beauvoir Studies