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In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

Abstract

This paper uses a selection of foxhunting stories to explore the way in which anthropomorphized foxes were used to communicate pro-hunting messages to their mostly young readers. These justifications also appeared in nonfictional foxhunting sporting literature. Indeed, this literature included some of the same incredible anecdotes that also appeared in the work of nature writers at the turn of the twentieth century such as Charles G.D. Roberts and Ernest Thompson Seton working in a new sympathetic genre called the “animal story.” These writers found themselves under attack because naturalists like John Burroughs, and hunters, including President Theodore Roosevelt, found their stories to be inaccurate and anthropocentric. Roosevelt dubbed them the “nature fakers.” Foxhunting “histories” employed imaginative material and much anthropomorphism but were not attacked for doing so. This tends to indicate that anthropomorphisms were more acceptable when they were facilitating animal exploitation than when they were used to promote the perspective of nonhuman animals.

In: Society & Animals
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Abstract

The present article discusses scientific research in relation to the norms of representative democracy, arguing that politicians are committed to base their policy on scientific evidence. It is argued that people have both natural interests and social interests and that our natural interests, which we have acquired through natural selection and adaptation, are best taken care of by a representative democracy in which science proliferates. The article also argues why politicians and the public should trust science as the best means to fulfil our natural interests.

In: Danish Yearbook of Philosophy

Abstract

In this article, Severson explores the insights of Emmanuel Levinas regarding theodicy and the problem of evil. Levinas considers philosophical and practical justifications of suffering to be blasphemous, violating the sanctity of the suffering of the other person, even when well-meant. Severson introduces distinctions between “pain” and “suffering” to extrapolate and explain Levinas’s striking rejection of theodicy.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
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In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
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Abstract

One little known mode of revelation these days is “mystical revelation,” to which there were many appeals in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, principally among Quietists and Semi-Quietists. This paper focuses on one such appeal, that made in L’Abandon à la Providence divine by the writer conventionally known as Jean-Pierre de Caussade. The essay seeks to use phenomenology in order to describe mystical revelation and to see to what extent its notion of “pure love” can be defended. A partial defense can be launched by way of Peter Lombard’s Distinction 1.17 in his Sententiae, namely that the Holy Spirit animates the loving soul. A weak form of Quietism can be defended; however, one can see a stronger form of it that has emerged in contemporary phenomenology itself.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion
Author:

Abstract

This paper argues that Friedrich Nietzsche was a mystic and that his post-Gay Science (1882) thought should be understood as an unfolding expression of his mystical experiences. Drawing on Nietzsche’s Nachlass (notes), letters, and published writings, I show that he undoubtedly had at least two major mystical experiences and that these experiences were the source of all the cardinal motifs of his later thought. The apparent tensions or paradoxes between Nietzsche’s cardinal teachings, above all that between the superman and the eternal recurrence, are resolved once they are understood as products of a mystical epistemology derived from an intuitive source of knowledge purportedly beyond the dualities intrinsic to ordinary modes of cognition. This intuitio mystica, which Nietzsche declared to be the real purpose of all philosophy, is coextensive with a type of mysticism I call apotheosis, based on the individual ego’s identification with a unity underlying all reality.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion