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Abstract

This article argues that the lack of comprehensive scholarly treatments of how the OT speaks about God’s knowability has to do with the complexity of the topic and the diversity of how the OT addresses it. It shows the diverse ways of how previous scholars have approached the OT statements and assumptions about God’s knowability (and the knowledge of God), clarifies how these statements and assumptions are related to each other, and gives some ideas about possible directions of future research.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
In: Philosophical Studies Journal
In: Marsilii de Inghen Quaestiones super quattuor libros "Sententiarum"
In: Marsilii de Inghen Quaestiones super quattuor libros "Sententiarum"
In: Marsilii de Inghen Quaestiones super quattuor libros "Sententiarum"
In: Marsilii de Inghen Quaestiones super quattuor libros "Sententiarum"
In: Marsilii de Inghen Quaestiones super quattuor libros "Sententiarum"
In: Marsilii de Inghen Quaestiones super quattuor libros "Sententiarum"
Author:

Abstract

In John 20:11–18, Mary Magdalene meets Jesus after his death. She turns around twice, a double gesture that has puzzled New Testament scholars. In this article, I offer a performative reading of Mary Magdalene’s turns based on Judith Butler’s theory of gesture and the literary inventory of ancient recognition scenes. I argue that the double gesture does not emphasize the difference between a physical and an inner status of recognition. Instead, it is conceived as a non-identical repetition or quotation. It points to other turnings and other duplicities. Both turns are part of a performative process that unfolds the new identities of the main characters after their separation. Mary is not portrayed as a misunderstanding disciple who needs two turns to recognize Jesus, but as part of a reciprocal process that mirrors Jesus’ double appearance and the text’s double layers of meaning.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

In this article, Severson explores the insights of Emmanuel Levinas regarding theodicy and the problem of evil. Levinas considers philosophical and practical justifications of suffering to be blasphemous, violating the sanctity of the suffering of the other person, even when well-meant. Severson introduces distinctions between “pain” and “suffering” to extrapolate and explain Levinas’s striking rejection of theodicy.

In: Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion