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Abstract

This case study extends Elligan’s (2000, 2004) Rap Therapy model to explore the pedagogical usefulness of contemporary rap music. Methodologically, the authors borrow the testimonio from Latina Feminist Scholarship, to explore the ways in which young people participating in a summer literacy program analyzed their lives and the world through rap music; how rap music supported their healing; and how rap music was used as a pedagogical tool. Over the course of four months the co-authors of this study created and analyzed 17 co-written testimonios for their generative themes. The authors conclude with a presentation of The (Re) mix—a rap-centered pedagogical framework. The (Re) mix is made up of three, interconnected pillars. One, contemporary rap music (re)tells the experience(s) of the dispossessed. It helps shift the blame for oppression in the world towards the structures of society. Second, contemporary rap music (re)affirms young peoples’ existence. It provides them with an imaginative environment to imagine a more just world. Third, contemporary rap music (re)stores our humanity. It is a tool to name, connect, and move beyond our pain, creating a context for healing as individuals in a collective society. The authors hope that findings of this study empower other educators to infuse contemporary rap music into their pedagogies as a method for students to better read and write the world, adding to the body of knowledge related to critical media literacy.

In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy
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In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy
11 Being Animated by a Transformative Soul
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures

Abstract

Moving beyond axial considerations, we recount the experiences of Black queer educators and the literacies we engage in for survival and thriving (Blockett et al. 2022). In our pointed exploration of virtual and physical, we consider anti-Black and anti-queer moments as sites of fugitivity – a Black resistance formation (Best & Hartman 2005; Givens 2021). For this paper, we focus on non-conventional, un-codified, rule-defying literacies that Black queer people have and continued to engage to resist, subvert, decenter, exist, and create. In doing so we provide insight into the survival and agency of Black queer people, and invite opportunities to consider new possible futures for the experiences of Black queer educators.

In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy

In this article the authors make an argument for a critical race media literacy that is attuned to the ways in which popular media are used to adhere media consumers to a taken for granted US national identity. Using the concept of “black narrative commodities”, the article suggests that black pain and/or black visibility become filters through which black lives are brought into a nationalist framing. The article uses three popular media commodities to illustrate how how pain and visibility mask a nationalist agenda, including: (1) the videotaped killing of Eric Garner, (2) the book The New Jim Crow and the film 13th: An Original Netflix Documentary, and (3) the movie Black Panther. The authors suggest that critical media literacy absent a cogent and principled interrogation of the interplay between race, class, and the nation-State is incomplete.

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In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy
7 Contemplating My Autoethnography
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
Part 2 Contemplating Transformative Research Methods
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy

Abstract

Since its inception, social media has been an important method of constructing and performing identity, including gender identity. Identity work on social media is perhaps especially relevant to Gen Z (those born after 1996; Parker & Igielnik, 2020), who are the first generation with access to it in early childhood. In this article, we explore how Gen Z constructs and performs gender identity and other facets of intersectional identity on popular video platform TikTok by analyzing selected content from three TikTokers through the lenses of performativity, intersectionality, and automediality.

In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy