Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 7,700 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Primary Language: eng x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All

Abstract

The focus of this article is to examine a specific case of a failing regional innovation system (RIS). Our study focuses on a specific project that was conducted in a triple helix constellation where public actors occupy the centre of the triple helix constellation. By examining and interpreting this single case, we aim to illustrate the consequences that result from uncertainty over who the triple helix constellation is accountable to as well as the consequences that has for the overall assessment of the outcome of the triple helix. We show how the overall initiative constituted a failure, but when one considers the activities that were organized and implemented by the RIS, then it is problematic to define it as a failure. This leads us to the conclusion that we should evaluate RIS from different perspectives and on different levels, and we need to consider the time dimension in our evaluation.

Open Access
In: Triple Helix

Abstract

In ethnopharmacology, scientists often survey indigenous communities to identify and collect natural remedies such as medicinal plants that are yet to be investigated pharmacologically in a laboratory setting. The Nagoya Protocol provided international agreements on financial benefit sharing. However, what has yet only been poorly defined in these agreements are the non-financial benefits for local intellectual property right owners, such as traditional healers who originally provided the respective ethnomedicinal information. Unfortunately, ethnopharmacologists still rarely return to local communities. In this video article, the authors present a method for transferring results back to traditional healers in rural indigenous communities, taking the authors’ previous studies among 39 traditional healers in Uganda as an example. The authors’ approach is based on a two-day workshop, and the results are presented as original footage in the video article. The authors’ work demonstrated a successful method for ensuring bidirectional benefit and communication while fostering future scientific and community-work collaborations. The authors believe it is the moral duty of ethnopharmacologists to contribute to knowledge transfer and feedback once a study is completed. The workshop method, as an example for science outreach, might also be regarded as a valuable contribution to research on education theory and science communication.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Hugh Morrison

Abstract

The British Protestant children’s missionary movement of the nineteenth and early- to mid-twentieth century was an educational movement, wherein philanthropy and pedagogy went hand in hand. Bringing an educational lens to bear on this group provides a more cohesive interpretive framework by which to make sense of the various elements than hitherto has been considered. As such, the Protestant children’s missionary movement emerges historically as a much more complex entity than simply a means of raising money or cramming heads full of knowledge. Across a range of geographic settings it acted as: a key site of juvenile religious and identity formation; a defining vehicle for the creation and maintenance of various types or scales of community (local, denominational, emotional, regional, national or global); a movement within which civic and religious messages were emphatically conflated (especially with respect to nation and empire); and in which children both participated in imperial or quasi-global networks of information exchange (especially as consumers of missionary periodicals) and became informed, active and responsive agents of missionary support in their own right.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Education
Authors: Shibao Guo and Yan Guo

Abstract

Canada is often held up internationally as a successful model of immigration. Yet, Canada’s history, since its birth as a nation one hundred and fifty-four years ago, is one of contested racial and ethnic relations. Its racial and ethnic conflict and division resurfaces during covid-19 when there has been a surge in racism and xenophobia across the country towards Asian Canadians, particularly those of Chinese descent. Drawing on critical race theory and critical discourse analysis, this article critically analyzes incidents that were reported in popular press during the pandemic pertaining to this topic. The analysis shows how deeply rooted racial discrimination is in Canada. It also reveals that the anti-Asian and anti-Chinese racism and xenophobia reflects and retains the historical process of discursive racialization by which Asian Canadians have been socially constructed as biologically inferior, culturally backward, and racially undesirable. To combat and eliminate racism, we propose a framework of pandemic anti-racism education for the purpose of achieving educational improvement in post-covid-19.

Full Access
In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

In an attempt to mitigate community spread of covid 19, many school districts cancelled face to face sessions and shifted to online instruction. As communities enacted quarantines, schools were pressed to transition learning environments to students’ homes while policymakers and leaders implemented a number of new policies and procedures. The purpose of this study explored how the covid 19 transformed the leadership of educators in three southwest Texas school districts when instruction was modified to e-learning. This qualitative study centered on the accounts and experiences of 25 elementary and secondary educators from 3 different Title I school districts in southwest Texas. The participants were graduate students in a nationally recognized program for the development of social justice leaders. As a result, this study uncovered how the practice of these educational leaders evolved to serve the Latino students in their communities. This study will highlight how the teachers’ agency helped leverage services to provide the learning opportunity for the learners.

Full Access
In: Beijing International Review of Education
In: Beijing International Review of Education
Authors: Zhixing Xu, Jing Lin, and Siyong Xia

Abstract

To exert benefits of physical education and enhance the health of teenagers, the idea of Quality Physical Education (qpe) had been put into practice since 1995 as the guideline for the implementation of physical education in K-12 schools in the United States. qpe consists of two parts: the conceptual framework and practical guidelines, which contain four core elements: “Opportunity to Learn,” “Meaningful Content,” “Appropriate Instruction,” and “Student and Program Assessment.” Each core component is broken down into sections, subsections, and programmatic elements, to fit into unesco’s benchmarks, which regulate the overall process and procedures in physical education as minimum standards, offering strong support for educators to design and implement high qpe. In the global endeavor to implement qpe, however there are major barriers, specifically institutional barriers, teacher-related barriers, and student-related barriers which prevent qpe to be fully and effectively adopted.

Full Access
In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

This article captures the results of a study illustrating the challenges experienced by newcomer youth to Canada in adapting to online learning between March and June 2020. A collaborative research team consisting of a local immigrant-serving agency, local school board and educators, and a group of interdisciplinary university researchers conducted a qualitative study to explore educational challenges from the perspectives of high school-aged youth and parents of elementary school students. We found that the covid-19 crisis exposed the fissures in the education system whereby those most in need of the supposed support offered by the education system were not intentionally included in organizational policies and procedures, thus further exacerbating educational inequities and compounding the pre-Covid challenges students experienced. This study also models collaborative and community-centred research on how educators and school boards could work with community supporting agencies to provide support for newcomer youth during and beyond the Covid-19 pandemic.

Full Access
In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

The global health crisis caused by the sars-CoV-2 virus has impacted higher education systems worldwide. Emergency remote teaching strategies have been common organizational responses, which came with challenges, particularly in systems that lacked the capacity for digital provision. Building on strategic and crisis management theory and literature, this study investigates student attitudes towards organizational responses to the crisis in public higher education institutions in Poland. Drawing on findings of an online survey completed by 359 students from 61 institutions, this research has revealed that more than half of the respondents were satisfied with organizational responses to the crisis. Instructors’ self-motivation was identified as a key enabler of a successful implementation of distance learning, while their lack of familiarity with e-learning and technology were found as dominant barriers. The findings of this research can support institutions in other contexts to strengthen their commitment to educational improvement in a period of crisis and digital transformation.

Full Access
In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

This paper takes up Leigh methodological stance of pausing to consider how and whether the U.S. federal government’s theory of educational change, or their plan for educational equity and accountability, is answerable to Black, Indigenous, and students of color in the context of the global pandemic, the switch to remote learning, and global uprisings for Black lives. To discuss the federal government’s current theory of educational change, we (the authors) conducted a policy document review, outlining the U.S.’s educational response(s) to the ongoing global health crisis. The paper reports on current federal law requirements and waivers for: assessments, accountability, reporting, and school identification. We also discuss how the federal educational response is limited for addressing the context and learning of Black, Indigenous and students of color. We practice answerability by positing alternative approaches for educational policymaking in the age of covid-19.

Full Access
In: Beijing International Review of Education