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Abstract

In Australia, schools and faculties of education are mandated to abide by a policy requiring preservice teachers (pst s), to complete supervised professional placement (pe) in schools. The pe are drawn upon to meet the assessment criteria for degree completion. Two strategies are reported that supported individuals and education institutions to meet policy requirements while in lockdown. First, technology was used to overcome the challenge of providing pe for hundreds of pst s by supporting online learning experiences. In the second, visual technologies were used to support pst s to meet the needs of an assessment criterion. Findings indicate that innovative solutions to challenges with pe and related assessments at the university can be mobilized in a short time frame using visual technologies. Further findings indicate that, in unprecedented times, policies developed for use in different contexts can be met with innovative collaborative efforts with a focused goal that transcend seemingly insurmountable challenges.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

From March 2020 in Australia, the covid-19 pandemic resulted in regulations for social distancing, which meant that students were homeschooled. Social distancing exponentially increased the exposure of most young children to digital technology such as touchscreens (iPads) and digital flip cameras. This study focuses on two seven-year-old children who maintain their friendship during covid-19 by imaginary performances and playing virtual games. A cultural–historical approach is used in the study to analyze the children’s experience as they connect through virtual worlds and build imaginary spaces, contributing to sustaining their relationship during challenging times. Findings indicate that the children built a collective social situation of development integrating sophisticated imaginary, real and virtual worlds. The children’s perspective – their motive orientations and intentions towards a new social situation provided new opportunities for learning in a virtual imaginary world. The combination of a real, an imaginary and a virtual world supported the children to experience a range of emotions including joyous moments, empathy and attunement as they encouraged each other to participate.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Diana Amundsen

Abstract

This article explores whether digital communication technologies have applicability in reducing social isolation and loneliness among older adults. Issues of social isolation and loneliness among older adults are important as they are identified risk factors for mortality, disability, cognitive ability, depression and poor wellbeing. This problem is more urgent due to the Covid-19 pandemic which has required older adults to physically and socially distance from family, friends, neighbours, communities and health services. In the context of the present Covid-19 pandemic, this article is of interest to educators, social workers, community service providers, health service practitioners, gerontological scholars involved in preparing older adult communities for present and future traumatic events resulting in socially isolating experiences. The literature identified that use of technology to promote social connection and enhance wellbeing for older adults can be an effective intervention, but more information is needed as to what aspects of such interventions make them effective. This research advocates for improvement in wellbeing and social connectedness of older adults through consideration of interventions through a model for flourishing and wellbeing. The research contributes to our growing understanding of how to change the way we think, feel and act towards older adults, ageing and flourishing.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

covid-19 has changed the way we sing in choirs and has seen the extraordinary uptake of Zoom as a video chat platform across society. This is a reflective tale of four choirs members and their insights into how they improvised with traditional choir singing in a Zoom space. It consideres how zoom pedagogies allowed them to bridge social isolation during the pandemic. It includes the voices of the conductor; music teacher/technician; the voice of a media savvy artist choir member and finally the voice of a singing visual educator. The article embeds Deleuzoguattarian thinking. It draws on the concepts of the machinic assemblage and becoming as choir participants who embraced Zoom to facilitate song. Singing in a zoom virtual choir brings forth a burgeoning new relational way of being. To find ways to sing and imagine life and self without physical, temporal and spatial borders.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

covid-19 is an omnipresent feature of 2020, both globally and within Australia. For university students, a consequence of this has been the shift from on-campus to online delivery. Exploring these visual realities for lecturers and students, this article engages in Bakhtinian dialogism; a dialogic interaction that is born between peoples searching for meaning (). To do so, the authors engaged with and responded to students’ survey data whom they lecture and coordinate. Although the survey had limited responses, it enabled the authors to dialogue about received knowledge (istina) from students and contemplate this in relation to the authors’ own perspectives and experiences (pravda). Through this engagement, they suggest the importance of visually imbued emotive connectivity and dialogic relational care within web-conferencing, as well as didactic lecturing as valid forms of visual engagement.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In his last book Chaosmosis, Felix Guattari (1995, p. 129) argues that both “intellectuals and artists have got nothing to teach anyone,” and that they produce “toolkits composed of concepts, percepts and affects, which diverse publics will use at their convenience.” In this video presentation and accompanying article, the authors explore Guattari’s claim as a provocation for visual pedagogy and play with the idea that an artist might have nothing to teach anyone in relation to the idea of visual pedagogies. And, then, what happens when an artist and a teacher talk about visual pedagogies? To open up a dialogue, they employ the cliché, ‘I don’t know much about art but I know what I like’. This statement invites thoughts on the tensions between truth-telling, disciplinarity, and affect. Here the authors take the cliché a step further within the context of visual pedagogies and meaning making. They position this dialogue with the cinematic art work, Flight (2018), which aims to give the viewer a different sensation of the world, to render the familiar unfamiliar, and to let things be (Roder & Sturm, 2017), in order to think differently.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Romaine Logere

Abstract

One of the challenges to an increased rationalism within educational discourse has been a rethinking of mind-body relations. While there has been considerable discussion around what is implicated through the engagement of physical and theoretical sites of knowing, methodological difficulties related to how its resultant data might be meaningfully evidenced remain. Based on fieldwork conducted on a post-qualitative approach to transdisciplinary practice the author provides an account of a visual research method developed specifically to illustrate non-verbal experiences of group ideation. Writing from the position of a creative practitioner and intimate insider, the author explores how this positionality supported the role of bodily knowing in her research and the ways in which bodily experience offered utility to this research endeavour. The author concludes with a reflection on visualisation as a method to capture non-cognitive data and areas indicated through felt data for further exploration.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Maggie Haggerty

Abstract

This article draws on research conducted for the author’s PhD study and concepts in semiotic multimodality and relational materialism (; ) to explore the dynamics of what partnering with video/visual technologies in educational research with young children can be, do and become. This study was an ethnographic study which examined the curriculum and assessment priorities six focus children in Aotearoa-New Zealand encountered during their last six months in an early childhood (EC) centre and their first six months at school. In the article the author focuses on two video-recorded observations included in the PhD report by way of opening up for critical consideration the entanglements of possibility, risk and ethical responsibility entailed in the use of video in research with young children.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Suzanne Culshaw

Abstract

This article presents an innovative, video-based approach to the recruitment of research participants. A YouTube video was created and uploaded as part of a doctoral study exploring what it means to be struggling as a teacher. Following a review of the recruitment literature, which highlights a general lack of attention paid to the challenges of recruitment, the author explores the approach she took in planning the video. The video was the main promotional tool for the study and was communicated via Twitter and email. She also presents online survey findings on the perceived impact and influence of the video; the visual format, informal tone and the ability to see the researcher in person were rated very positively. A reflective analysis of the video transcript follows drawing on the literature as well as the survey findings. She concludes that video-based recruitment can be an inexpensive but powerful tool which allows a human connection with the researcher early on in the research process.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Chapter 10 Balance, Transcendence and Dispositions
Author: Hunter O’Hara
In: Transcendent Teacher Learner Relationships