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Author: Gábor Tüskés

Abstract

In this article, the author examines three autobiographical texts. These represent three different languages, three subgenres and two writers. The leading question is which patterns, motives and figures of thought determine the image of a country for the examined writer, and which of these become symbols of the fatherland in hindsight. The author’s main goal is therefore not to test the texts’ factual truth. Instead, three variants of emotional fictionalisation of patriotism are compared. By doing so, the author seeks to answer the question how factual truth is used, how autofiction and fictionality are created, and by which means and for what goal these images of the abandoned fatherland have become fictionalised. This question is treated in the context of the Habsburg dynasty’s imperial ambitions and of national resistance to it.

In: Daphnis

Abstract

One characteristic feature of the early modern media ensemble were the so-called ‘small’ and ‘occasional’ prints – a variety of pamphlet publications and single-sheet items that may be referred to as Flugpublizistik. In this article, one distinctive single-sheet variation, namely the early modern broadside with image and text parts, will be highlighted both as image transporting media and as a recycling product of the media ensemble. As is demonstrated using approaches from communication history and media economics, the early modern broadside with image and text parts is just another product of the most typical and constant processing of observed media-flows into new streams of media.

In: Daphnis
Author: Felix Urban

Abstract

It is part of the standard repertoire of Eulenspiegel research to point out that the jest novel Ein kurtzweilig Lesen von Dil Ulenspiegel (1510/15) places a highly contradictory protagonist of heterogenous motivations at the centre of its plot, which oscillates between vita and episode sequence. Rarely, however, have the instruments of structuralist narratology been used systematically to investigate how this heterogeneity and contradiction comes about and what strategies the text uses to connect the individual episodes. Using the example of the recurring element of ‘falling bodies’, this article analyzes the eventfulness, the production of coherence and the function of certain action patterns in the individual episodes. One central hypothesis of this article is that by means of recurrence and variation falling bodies establish a literary paradigm in the novel keeping a central theme of the text present: the dissociation of a superior protagonist who eludes the demands of the community on his body.

In: Daphnis
In: Daphnis
Author: Vera Faßhauer

Abstract

Wearing the features of the artist’s own contorted face, Messerschmidt’s grimacing Head Pieces have been mystifying their viewers for centuries. Most interpreters have regarded them from a purely artistic point of view and tended to certify the sculptor’s serious mental issues. This article takes an interdisciplinary and intermedial approach to Messerschmidt’s busts by paralleling them with the diary records of the physician Senckenberg, which likewise mirror the author’s meticulous self-observation and are consequently perceived with similar irritation. It is shown that the frequent pathologization of both Messerschmidt’s and Senckenberg’s work derives not least from the decidedly non-academic nature of their self-studies, which they felt were impeded by the temptations of daemons jealous of their insight into arcane knowledge. Rather than passing verdicts on the authors’ mental health or the validity of their religious and professional convictions, their motivations are to be considered according to their own early modern world view.

In: Daphnis