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Edited by Walter Dietrich and Samuel Arnet

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Die dritte, mehrbändige Auflage des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons zum Alten Testament (HALAT) von Koehler & Baumgartner erschien zwischen 1967 und 1995. Das Werk behandelt sämtliche Lexeme aus der Hebräischen Bibel, bezieht aber auch außerbiblische Belege und antike Übersetzungen ein und bietet zudem oft ausführliche Sachdiskussionen und umfangreiche Angaben zu (seinerzeit aktueller) Fachliteratur.

Die hier vorliegende Konzise und aktualisierte Ausgabe des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons (KAHAL) basiert auf HALAT, konzentriert sich aber ganz auf die lexikographische Behandlung der biblischen Lexeme. Die etymologischen Einträge sind auf dem Stand der gegenwärtigen Semitistik neu erarbeitet. Eigennamen werden ohne Etymologie, aber in Umschrift aufgeführt.

Mit KAHAL wird Fachleuten wie Studierenden der Theologie und benachbarter Disziplinen ein handliches und aufdatiertes Hilfsmittel zum Studium der Hebräischen Bibel an die Hand gegeben.

Verantwortlich für die Etymologien sind folgende Wissenschaftler:
Prof. Dr. Manfried Dietrich (Universität Münster),
Juniorprofessor Dr. des. Viktor Golinets (Universität Basel/Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg),
Prof. Dr. Regine Hunziker-Rodewald (Université de Strasbourg),
Dr. Dirk Schwiderski (Universität Heidelberg).


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The third edition of Hebräisches und Aramäisches Lexikon zum Alten Testament (HALAT) by Koehler & Baumgartner appeared in a series of fascicles between 1967 and 1995. It deals with the lexemes of the whole Hebrew Bible, and includes citations from extra-biblical sources and the ancient versions as well as much discussion of the secondary literature then available.

The Konzise und aktualisierte Ausgabe des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons (KAHAL) is based on HALAT but it focuses on the lexicographic treatment of the biblical lexemes. The etymological material has been revised to reflect the current status of studies in comparative Semitic philology. Proper names are all now transcribed but without any proposed etymologies.

KAHAL offers scholars and students of the Hebrew Bible and theology a handy and up-to-date work of reference.

The following scholars are responsible for the etymologies:
Prof. Dr. Manfried Dietrich (Universität Münster),
Juniorprofessor Dr. des. Viktor Golinets (Universität Basel/Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg),
Prof. Dr. Regine Hunziker-Rodewald (Université de Strasbourg),
Dr. Dirk Schwiderski (Universität Heidelberg).

Koehler and Baumgartner

Brill is pleased to present this Study Edition of the Hebräisches und Aramäisches Lexikon zum Alten Testament in two handy volumes. It has proven to be a valuable resource for scholars and students. In this Study Edition the complete vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible, including those parts of books which are written in Aramaic, is available. The dictionary combines scholarly thoroughness with easy accessibility, and so meets the needs of a wide range of users. The enormous advances that have taken place in the field of Semitic linguistics since the days of the older dictionaries of Classical Hebrew are well documented and assessed, as well as the often detailed discussions in modern Bible commentaries of words where the meaning is particularly difficult. But the alphabetical ordering of entries rather than the traditional arrangement of words according to their roots is particularly helpful to the new student, and also saves the advanced user much time.
This Study Edition is an unabridged version of the five volume edition of the Hebräisches und Aramäisches Lexikon zum Alten Testament.

Edited by Johannes de Moor

The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in Biblical and Jewish Studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible. To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain additions and corrections, a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index, as well as an English-Aramaic index.

Edited by Johannes de Moor

The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in Biblical and Jewish Studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible. To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain additions and corrections, a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index, as well as an English-Aramaic index.

Edited by Johannes de Moor

The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in Biblical and Jewish Studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible. To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain additions and corrections, a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index, as well as an English-Aramaic index.

Series:

Edited by Naoya Katsumata

A critical edition of the Hebrew liturgical poems (from the Cairo Geniza) of Nehemya b. Shelomo (Babylonia, 10th century). The English introduction includes: Hebrew neologism, unknown philosophical-scientific sources in Nehemya's poetry, possible relationships with contemporary Syriac Christianity.

Jewish Poet in Muslim Egypt

Moses Darʿīs Hebrew Collection. Critical Edition with Introduction and Commentary

Series:

Leon Weinberger

Moses Dar‘ī of Alexandria was the product of both Arab courtly culture and Jewish civilization, and certainly the most gifted poet of medieval Karaism. This collection of his work reflects the tension and blend between his two contrasting backgrounds.
The volume offers a close reading of the Hebrew collection of over five hundred of his writings, based on manuscripts from St. Petersburg, Ramle and New York. This gives good reason to believe that Moses Dar'‘1,133

Biblia Hebraica Leningradensia

Prepared according to the Vocalization, Accents, and Masora of Aaron ben Moses ben Asher in the Leningrad Codex, with Adaptations to Halakhic Requirements

Edited by Dotan

The most accurate edition of the Leningrad Codex in print, the Biblia Hebraica Leningradensia presents a thoroughly revised, reset, and redesigned edition of the Hebrew Bible meticulously prepared by renowned masoretic scholar Aron Dotan. The BHL includes features that suit it for research, classroom, and liturgical use. Scholars will find this a welcome edition of the Leningrad Codex, the oldest complete manuscript of the Hebrew Bible, whose text and layout it precisely follows. A foreword and four appendices provide the researcher with important details and distinctions about the codex. In addition to being a scientific edition, it was originally commissioned in Israel to follow the necessary adaptations that qualify it for Jewish liturgical use, such as divisions into weekly portions and their subdivisions for synagogue reading.

The Leningrad Codex

A Facsimile Edition

Edited by Astrid B. Beck, David Noel Freedman and James A. Sanders

The oldest complete Hebrew Bible in the world is the Leningrad Codex. Housed in the Saltykov-Shchedrin State Public Library in St. Petersburg, Russia, and dating to 1009 C.E., the Leningrad Codex stands as the single most important extant manuscript for establishing the text of the Hebrew Bible and is the basis for virtually all critical editions of the Hebrew Bible.
In a landmark publishing event in biblical scholarship, the Leningrad Codex is now available for the first time in a facsimile edition. This beautiful scholar's edition of the Leningrad Codex, produced under the auspices of the University of Michigan in cooperation and consultation with the Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center and West Semitic Research Project, features a high quality 25,4 x 30,5 cm. hardcover format that includes sixteen full-color illuminated carpet pages that capture in precise detail the Codex's lovely medieval artwork.

Koehler and Baumgartner

To accommodate a new generation of scholars, we are reissuing the complete set of Ludwig Koehler and Walter Baumgartner's famous Lexicon in a two-volume edition. This new two-volume set will include a new 100-page introduction and an additional listing of abbreviations. It will have more than 1,900 two-column pages.

Edited by Johannes de Moor

The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in research in Biblical and Jewish studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible.
To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index.
Publication is envisaged in a total of 21 volumes of 400-450 pages each, over a five to six-year period, as follows:
Joshua, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (1 vol.) January 1995 (AVAILABLE)
Judges, ed. Willem Smelik (Kampen University) (1 vol.), July 1995 (AVAILABLE)
1 & 2 Samuel, ed. Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman (Kampen University) (3 vols.), November 1995
Ezekiel, ed. Thomas J. Finley (Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, La Mirada, USA) (3 vols.), 1996
Isaiah, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1997
Jeremiah, ed. Floris Sepmeijer (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1997
1 & 2 Kings, ed. Bernard Grossfeld (The University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA) (3 vols.), 1998
The Twelve, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1999
Index (1 vol.), 2000

Koehler and Baumgartner

The publication of volume 4 completes the Hebrew part of the lexicon. The object of this volume is in accordance with the three previously published volumes and also with the earlier editions of the work on the Hebrew vocabulary of the Old Testament.
The vocabulary is recorded as closely as possible to the meaning and its various nuances. The main emphasis lies in the parts of speech (verbs, substantive prepositions and numerals) as well as on first names, place names and regional names. The old translations, such as the Septuagint, the Vulgate, the Targums and the Syriac version are considered as well as the Hebrew-related Semitic languages.

A Concise Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament

Based upon the Lexical Work of Ludwig Koehler and Walter Baumgartner

Edited by William L. Holladay

Please note that this title is available to customers in North America exclusively through Eerdmans Publishing Company (www.eerdmans.com).

De substantia orbis

Hebrew text with English translation and commentary

Series:

Averroes

The Book of Daniel

With Saadia's Arabic translation. A Babylonian-Yemenite manuscript. Published in facsimile with an introduction by Sh. Morag

The Hebrew Bible

With Pre-Masoretic Tiberian Vocalization. The Prophets, According to the Codex Reuchlinianus (in a Critical Analysis)

Edited by Alexander Sperber

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

David,of Makow,d. 1815., Bachrach, Jacob ben Moses,1824-1896., Ezekiel, of Radzymin., Feder, Tobias,ca. 1760-1817. and Volozhiner, Hayyim ben Isaac,1749-1821.

Leṿi, Yuda Ary. ben Mordekhai., Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930., Landsberg, Mendel,1786-1866. and Volozhiner, Hayyim ben Isaac,1749-1821.

Crescas, Hasdai,1340-ca. 1410. and Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Shapira, Israel,1882-1957.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930. and Strack, H. L.(Hermann Leberecht),1848-1922.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Raphael, Ralph B.(Ralph Baer),1856-1903.

Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930. and Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.

Raffalovich, Samuel,1867-1927. and Deinard, Ephraim,1846-1930.