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Editor-in-Chief: Amneris Roselli
Founded in 1979 by the Dipartimento di Studi del Mondo Classico e del Mediterraneo Antico, AION Sezione di Filologia e Letteratura Classica is currently published on behalf of the Dipartmento di Asia, Africa e Mediterraneo of the Università di Napoli - l'Orientale.
The journal publishes articles in the field of philology, literature, history of Greek and Latin texts and their transmission throughout the centuries, with an eye to the Ancient Eastern world, Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.
The journal aims to facilitate cooperation among scholars of all the fields related to the Ancient world and to disseminate their research results. AION accepts articles in English, French, German and Italian and it is aimed at academic readers, libraries and cultural institutions interested in the ancient world.
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Author: Fausto Montana

Abstract

Alexander of Cotiaeum, the cultivated sophistes and one among the teachers of Aelius Aristides and Marcus Aurelius, distinguished himself in linguistic and literary studies, teaching, and cultural communication. Though without achieving brilliant results, he also engaged in some of the questions previously discussed by the most learned scholars. This cultural figure displays some typicality with respect to the average educated personalities (grammatikoi) of the Antonine renaissance. However, current studies are revealing a possible specificity of Alexander’s role: his influence, by way of educational approach, on the making of literary trends and models (canons) of the concurrent high culture, between New Sophistic and Atticism. This paper focuses on the very philological side (diorthosis, or textual criticism) of the composite and complex intellectual profile of Alexander.

Open Access
In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

The search for purity of language during the Palaeologan age has often been regarded as a revival of the Atticist movement of the second century AD. Students who had access to the higher education aimed at mastering this new form of Attic Greek: a large set of ancient authors deemed to be models of language and style served as repositories of lexical materials. Within this framework the need of school handbooks, dictionaries is quite understandable. In the first section of the paper I offer an overview of the multifarious typologies of scholarly texts largely used in the first Palaeologan age. Then, I focus more specifically on some miscellaneous excerpts merged into anthological manuscripts, by taking into account a largely overlooked series of grammatical and lexical annotations on Lucian. Differently from what is often stated in the catalogues, I show how the order of the items follows closely Lucian’s texts. These annotations could be the transcription of teachers’ notes and/or lecture notes taken during collective/private readings of texts.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Stefano Valente

Abstract

This paper sketches how the investigation both of Atticist lexica produced or copied during the Palaeologan age and of Atticist entries in more general lexicographic works of that period can contribute to historical sociolinguistic studies. When examining Byzantine lexicography from this perspective, the highly conservative character of the content should always be kept in mind. Despite the re-use of linguistic categories elaborated and employed in earlier scholarly traditions, Byzantine Atticist lexica still offer evidence to help us understand how some of these categories such as ‘Attic’ vs ‘non-Attic’ were applied during the Palaeologan age.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Fevronia Nousia

Abstract

Manuel Moschopoulos’ Peri schedon, one of the most popular grammatical manuals in Byzantium and beyond, represents a comprehensive textbook composed with a broader scope in mind, namely to cover not only the teaching of grammar but also poetry and rhetoric.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Stefano Valente

Abstract

The Compendium on Physics (Epitome physica) by the Byzantine theologian and philosopher Nikephoros Blemmydes (13th cent.) was a very successful textbook on Natural Philosophy containing a summary of physics, meteorology and astronomy. This compendium was also conceived for being used as support for teaching. For his purposes, Blemmydes combined passages taken from different sources into a new text: Aristotle and his commentators as well as Cleomedes were his main sources. Since a manuscript with an earlier version of the text still survives, it is also possible to go deeper into the workshop of this Byzantine author and to investigate the use of the sources in both textual stages. This paper will therefore be devoted to analysing the inner structure of the Epitome physica and Blemmydes’ activity as an author.

Open Access
In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Momigliano

Abstract

In this paper work on building a linguistically tagged corpus of Byzantine texts (ByzTec) is discussed. In its present form the corpus consists of texts from the 10th and 14th centuries, and genres such as history, letter-writing and oratory are represented. Technical aspects of the corpus are described, as well as the different kinds of linguistic phenomena covered, such as morphology and semantics. So far, the primary purpose of the undertaking has been to facilitate the author’s own work on linguistic variation within an elite of Byzantine society. However, it is to be hoped that the corpus can be of use to others, including those interested in sociolinguistic aspects of Byzantine Greek.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Luigi Bravi

Abstract

The paper draws attention on the secondary chorus of frogs in Aristophanes’ Frogs. Its actual presence on the stage is matter of discussion between scholars. The dramatic function of the frogs, the rapid dialogue with Dionysus and the close construction of verse in this lyrical dialogue seem to suggest the hypothesis of a visible chorus.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"