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Author: Marta Fogagnolo
SGG 2 offers a commented critical edition of the preserved textual fragments from the Homeric studies of the Greek scholar-poet Antimachus of Colophon (floruit ca. 400 bce). If as an epic and elegiac poet Antimachus was a forerunner of the Alexandrian docta poesis, he was also an editor and scholar of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, producing an ekdosis of both poems (the first among the so-called kat’andra ‘editions’) and a syngramma, i.e. monograph, in which he dealt with biographical, exegetical and glossographical issues.

Abstract

The search for purity of language during the Palaeologan age has often been regarded as a revival of the Atticist movement of the second century AD. Students who had access to the higher education aimed at mastering this new form of Attic Greek: a large set of ancient authors deemed to be models of language and style served as repositories of lexical materials. Within this framework the need of school handbooks, dictionaries is quite understandable. In the first section of the paper I offer an overview of the multifarious typologies of scholarly texts largely used in the first Palaeologan age. Then, I focus more specifically on some miscellaneous excerpts merged into anthological manuscripts, by taking into account a largely overlooked series of grammatical and lexical annotations on Lucian. Differently from what is often stated in the catalogues, I show how the order of the items follows closely Lucian’s texts. These annotations could be the transcription of teachers’ notes and/or lecture notes taken during collective/private readings of texts.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Stefano Valente

Abstract

This paper sketches how the investigation both of Atticist lexica produced or copied during the Palaeologan age and of Atticist entries in more general lexicographic works of that period can contribute to historical sociolinguistic studies. When examining Byzantine lexicography from this perspective, the highly conservative character of the content should always be kept in mind. Despite the re-use of linguistic categories elaborated and employed in earlier scholarly traditions, Byzantine Atticist lexica still offer evidence to help us understand how some of these categories such as ‘Attic’ vs ‘non-Attic’ were applied during the Palaeologan age.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Fevronia Nousia

Abstract

Manuel Moschopoulos’ Peri schedon, one of the most popular grammatical manuals in Byzantium and beyond, represents a comprehensive textbook composed with a broader scope in mind, namely to cover not only the teaching of grammar but also poetry and rhetoric.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

In this paper work on building a linguistically tagged corpus of Byzantine texts (ByzTec) is discussed. In its present form the corpus consists of texts from the 10th and 14th centuries, and genres such as history, letter-writing and oratory are represented. Technical aspects of the corpus are described, as well as the different kinds of linguistic phenomena covered, such as morphology and semantics. So far, the primary purpose of the undertaking has been to facilitate the author’s own work on linguistic variation within an elite of Byzantine society. However, it is to be hoped that the corpus can be of use to others, including those interested in sociolinguistic aspects of Byzantine Greek.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Luigi Bravi

Abstract

The paper draws attention on the secondary chorus of frogs in Aristophanes’ Frogs. Its actual presence on the stage is matter of discussion between scholars. The dramatic function of the frogs, the rapid dialogue with Dionysus and the close construction of verse in this lyrical dialogue seem to suggest the hypothesis of a visible chorus.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Antonio Rollo

Abstract

After displaying the theory of Theodosian nominal morphology, the paper offers an overview of the development of Greek grammar in Byzantium between the twelfth and the fourteenth centuries. Starting from Theodoros Prodromos’ handbook it takes on the study of the Erotemata of Moschopoulos and examines their relationship with the erotematic genre.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

The paper deals with the linguistic typology and the manuscript tradition of the interlinear glosses to the Pindaric victory odes, and demonstrates that some glosses to Pindar’s Pythian odes (1–4) can be ascribed to Magister.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"

Abstract

One aspect of the Greek epic that has yet to be thoroughly explored is the possibility of differentiating, in the midst of formulaic wording, the different genres that from the point of view of Greek literature comprise, for example, the telling of heroic deeds (Iliad, Odyssey), gnomic-paraenetic poetry (Works and Days), or the stories of genealogies, be they divine (Theogony), or heroic (Ehoiai). However, each of these forms of poetic expression had available a specific formulaic apparatus apart from the other much more abundant and more visible, the epic one, shared among the different genres. Thus has it been pointed out on some occasions, although the critics have scarcely pursued the consequences. Here my proposal consists of investigating the dynamics of the formulaic diction of oral poetry of the genealogical type, based on information provided in this regard by the Hesiodic poems of the Theogony, and above all, of the Catalogue of Women.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"
Author: Klaas Bentein

Abstract

Whereas initially texts from the past were given relatively little attention in sociolinguistic studies, nowadays historical sociolinguistics as a discipline has come to maturity, too. A central notion in (historical) sociolinguistics is that of context: regrettably, however, there is still no generally accepted theory of how context can be captured and related to language. One of the few frameworks that has attempted to provide a coherent and unifying account is the so-called Functional Sociolinguistic framework. In this article, I illustrate the potential of this model for the study of Post-classical and Byzantine Greek complementation.

In: AION (filol.) Annali dell'Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale"