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The History (Taʾrikh) by Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī

Ibn Wāḍiḥ Qui Dicitur al-Yaʿqūbī, Historiae Vol. 1

M. Th. Houtsma

Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Yaʿqūbī was a Muslim imperial official and polymath of the third/ninth century. On the occasion of the publication of The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī. An English translation, edited by Matthew S. Gordon, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson, and Michael Fishbein (Leiden, 2017-2018), Brill is making the classic Arabic edition of al-Yaʿqūbī’s Taʾrīkh by M.Th. Houtsma (2 vols., 1883) available in paperback for the first time.

Volume 1 covers Pre-Islamic history, from Adam and Eve to the Patriarchs and Prophets of ancient Israel; Jesus and the Apostles; Assyria, Babylonia, and India; the Greek and Persian Empires; a variety of other regions including China and Ethiopia; and a section on the pre-Islamic Arabs. The current volume offers the Arabic text only. The English translation is found in vol. 2 of The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī.

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Edited by Various Authors & Editors

This set of 8 volumes contains the first 25 SEG volumes from the start in 1923 till 1976, as well as the index to volumes 11-20.

Petra Weber

Petra Weber

Petra Weber

Petra Kindhäuser

Edited by Petra Weber

In der ersten deutschen Übersetzung seit 140 Jahren liegt hier einer der berühmtesten Texte der Musikgeschichte erstmals in einer zuverlässigen und für die Praxis konzipierten zweisprachigen Ausgabe vor.
Die Musica Enchiriadis, entstanden in der zweiten Hälfte des 9. Jahrhunderts, tradiert die Theorie des europäischen Tonsystems, entwickelt eine der frühesten Tonschriften, schafft und erweitert die begrifflichen Grundlagen zur Beschreibung von Musik und entwickelt die früheste Form der abendländischen Mehrstimmigkeit. Daher ist es nicht zu viel gesagt, wenn man die Musica Enchiriadis als Grundlage sowohl der Musiktheorie als auch der Komposition in Europa bezeichnet.

Petra Weber

J. F. Niermeyer's Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus is a highly practical lexicon, providing researchers, teaching staff and students in the field of Medieval History with concise, essential information. Niermeyer Online on Brill’s Dictionary Platform is still the “compendious lexicon for rapid information” envisaged by Niermeyer and is the only online version based on the very latest print edition (content expanded by 10% in 2002). This last update also provided French, English and German translations for every entry of a Medieval Latin concept. Niermeyer Online offers searches on lemma and full text: searches can be refined by century of use. All entries are contextualized with relevant text passages. Niermeyer’s Lexicon Minus has established a reputation over more than 50 years as an invaluable, authoritative, and highly rated resource for medievalists, and Niermeyer Online is certain to be an indispensable working tool for historians working inside or outside an academic library.

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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M. Billerbeck and M. Somazzi

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Margarethe Billerbeck and Mario Somazzi

The transmission of the Seneca tragedies first became an object of critical discussion by the Italian humanists and has continued to occupy scholars to the present day. Besides a brief account of the critical work of Jodocus Badius (Ascensiana 1514) and of Girolamo Avanzi (Aldina 1517) the repertory lists systematically the conjectures recorded since M.A. Delrio (Second ed., 1619) down to the year 2007 and arranges them in the context of the critical discussion of the text. Conceived in the first instance as a work of reference for future editors, commentators and critical readers of the tragedies, the repertory is also a mirror of the critical acumen as well as the vagaries in the long tradition of Latin textual criticism.

Die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit der Überlieferung der Seneca-Tragödien beginnt im humanistischen Italien und wird seither intensiv betrieben; entsprechend zahlreich sind die Eingriffe und Vorschläge, welche zum besseren Verständnis des überlieferten Textes vorgetragen worden sind. Neben einem Einblick in die kritische Arbeit von Jodocus Badius (Ascensiana 1514) und von Girolamo Avanzi (Aldina 1517) verzeichnet das Repertorium systematisch die seit M.A. Delrio (2. Ausg. 1619) bis zum Jahre 2007 erfassten Konjekturen und ordnet sie unter jeweiliger Angabe des Fundortes in die textkritische Diskussion ein. Das Repertorium ist in erster Linie als Nachschlagewerk für künftige Herausgeber und Kommentatoren der Seneca-Tragödien gedacht. Als Spiegel von Scharfsinn und Irrungen in der Konjekturalkritik leistet es zudem einen Beitrag zur traditionsreichen Geschichte der lateinischen Philologie.

Various Authors & Editors

Latin-French Book of Hours Manuscripts in the Koninklijke Bibliotheek [National Library of the Netherlands], The Hague

General Background
Books of hours were devotional prayer books designed to be used by the Catholic laity in reciting prayers at the eight traditional “hours” of the canonical day, which ran from “matins” before dawn to “vespers” in the evening and concluded with “compline” at bed time. They were without a doubt the most important and widespread books of the Middle Ages throughout Europe. Originating in the thirteenth century they continued to be made well into the sixteenth century, first as handwritten manuscripts, which by the fifteenth century were increasingly mass produced in workshops in the Low Countries and France, and following the introduction of printing after 1480 also in that format. They were in Latin but also frequently contained material, such as prayers, rubrics, rhymes and calendars of saints’ days, in the vernacular. In general they followed a standardized pattern that usually began with a set of prayers and readings in honor of the Virgin Mary (the so-called “Hours of the Virgin”) and also included the Hours of the Cross, the Hours of the Holy Spirit, the Seven Penitential Psalms and the Office of the Dead. Although generally cut from the same cloth, there was room for local variation within certain texts, called a “use”, for example “use of Paris”. Often material of a personal nature, such as favorite prayers, was inserted into the manuscripts and later into the printed books on pages left blank for this purpose. Marginal notes and jottings of a religious or more profane nature were common and books of hours were used to record family history, such as dates of births and deaths, but also to swear oaths and solemn vows, possession of the bible being still quite limited. They came in all price ranges, from lavish custom-made examples adorned with illuminated miniatures or full-page drawings by professional artists commissioned by nobles or wealthy bourgeois to inexpensive mass produced ones with a few illustrations of poor quality. If a person was likely to have any single book at all during this period, it would have been a book of hours. They were prized possessions meant to be used for both private and public devotion and were passed down to family members or other heirs at an owner’s demise, usually with the injunction to remember the deceased in one’s prayers. As a linchpin of the Catholic religion meant “to offer lay people a suitably slimmed down and simplified share in the Church’s official cycle of daily prayer…” (Duffy 2007, p. 59), it is no wonder that books of hours came under attack during the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. In countries where the Reformation triumphed such as England, their production and use disappeared. In countries that remained Catholic on the other hand, such as France, printed books of hours continued to circulate, with new editions, often bilingual Latin-French, being issued right down into the twentieth century.

The collection of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek
Among the medieval manuscripts of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague are 37 Latin Books of Hours that also contain parts in French and are included in the library’s collection of French-language Medieval Manuscripts as catalogued by Anne S. Korteweg, which was micropublished previously by Moran (MMP113). The majority are from the fifteenth century (29), while there are also six manuscripts from the sixteenth century and one each from the fourteenth and thirteenth centuries. They find their provenance in various parts of France and the southern Netherlands and follow different “uses” as explained above, the most common in this collection being Rome (16 examples), followed by Paris (8). Virtually all contain varying numbers of miniatures and other forms of embellishment such as initials and border decorations. The microfiches reproduce the entire text of each manuscript, including all illustrations, in black and white. Their availability will further research into a variety of subjects in art history, history of religion and private life, manuscript studies and text studies.

More details
For complete details of each title, see the draft version of the guide, which can be downloaded from our site: www.moranmicropublications.nl. The illustrations can be consulted in color on the Koninklijke Bibliotheek’s website (see link on the front of this flyer, right column).

Reference: Eamon Duffy, Marking the Hours: English People and their Prayers 1240-1570 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2007)

J.L. Vives: De officio mariti

Introduction, Critical Edition, Translation and Notes

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Juan Luis Vives

Edited by Charles Fantazzi

This treatise is a sequel to Vives’ On the Education of the Christian Woman, published in Brill’s series, Selected Works of J.L. Vives. It studies the institution of marriage from a male vantage point, with interesting observations on female psychology, anticipating his later work, De anima. Vives insists more here on the weakness and instability of the woman than in the previous treatise, relying on the biological tenets of Aristotle and Galen. Much attention is given to the choice of a wife and to the husband’s role as tutor of his spouse and disciplinarian. The marriage debt is regarded as a necessary evil, as in St. Paul, while the spirituality of the union is exalted. The book was often printed together with the De institutione feminae Christianae and even considered as a fourth book of that work.

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Edited by Reinhold Friedrich, Berndt Hamm, Wolfgang Simon and Matthieu Arnold

Unlike most theologians of his age, Martin Bucer proved to be farsighted with respect to European affairs: In addition to his contacts within Alsace and Germany he established relations with almost every European country. It was his ecumenical attitude that always led him to mediate between the parties in the religious battles of his time. His deep commitment to the goal of reaching agreement can be traced in all his activities, works and letters.
Since the first editor, Jean Rott (Strasbourg), died in 1998, Bucer's correspondence has been edited in Erlangen. This academic edition of source material provides future research with a broad basis for significant aspects of Reformation history about which very little is known. Volume VI covers the period from May to October 1531.

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Marcovich

The Christian monumental historic-heroic epic Davidiad is the masterpiece of the prolific Croat Humanist Marko Marulić (Marcus Marulus, 1450-1524). The poem, comprising 6765 Latin hexameters, and divided into 14 books, was never published, and eventually even thought to be lost. Marulić's autograph resurfaced in the Biblioteca Nazionale of Turin, although it had been heavily damaged during the huge fire in January 1904. For the present edition the author has collated the original manuscript in Turin, made additional corrections, adopting the suggestions of Veljko Gortan, and reduced his first edition (1957, Mérida) to an absolutely necessary minimum. He has also enclosed a brief Vita Maruli, written by Marulić's contemporary Latin poet of Split, Franjo Božičević (Franciscus Natalis, 1469-1542).

Lexicon Latinitatis Nederlandicae Medii Aevi

Volume VIII. Sua-Z, with supplementa and corrigenda

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Fuchs, Weijers and Gumbert-Hepp

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Edited by Reinhold Friedrich, Berndt Hamm, Andreas Puchta and Roland Liebenberg

Unlike most theologians of his age, Martin Bucer proved to be farsighted with respect to European affairs: In addition to his contacts within Alsace and Germany he established relations with almost every European country. It was his ecumenical attitude that always led him to mediate between the parties in the religious battles of his time. His deep commitment to the goal of reaching agreement can be traced in all his activities, works and letters.
Since the first editor, Jean Rott (Strasbourg), died in 1998, Bucer's correspondence has been edited in Erlangen. This academic edition of source material provides future research with a broad basis for significant aspects of Reformation history about which very little is known. Volume V covers the period from September 1530 to May 1531. It therefore mainly contains information about Bucer's diplomatic journey after the Augsburg Diet, his correspondence with the Valdesian synod of Mérindol, his attempts to mediate between Luther and Zwingli with the help of his Konkordienschrift and to integrate the Swiss party in the Schmalcaldic confederation.

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E.L.J. Poortman

This volume is the first edition of Petrus de Alvernia's Sententia super librum 'De vegetabilibus et plantis'. The treatise 'De vegetabilibus et plantis', which goes back to the Peripatetic Nicolaus of Damascus and has an interesting tradition (from Greek into Syrian, from Syrian into Arabic, from Arabic into Latin), was considered to be a work of Aristotle's and was among the subjects prescribed for study in the Facultas Artium in Paris. Petrus de Alvernia's Sententia should primarily be regarded as an exposition of this often problematic work for the students of this faculty.
The Introduction discusses the tradition of 'De vegetabilibus et plantis', the authenticity of the ascription of the commentary to Petrus de Alvernia, the characteristiscs of the commentary, and its relation to the commentary by Albertus Magnus.The Text is followed by indices nominum, locorum, plantarum, and verborum potiorum.

Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (2 vols.)

Lexique latin médiéval - Medieval Latin Dictionary - Mittellateinisches Wörterbuch

Niermeyer and van de Kieft

Niermeyer's Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus is a highly practical lexicon, providing researchers, teaching staff and students in the field of Medieval History with concise, essential information.
This new edition is still the “compendious lexicon for rapid information” envisaged by Niermeyer, but current entries and definitions have been revised and new entries have been added. Furthermore, the dictionary is now enhanced with German definitions and therefore provides French, English and German translations for every entry of a Medieval Latin concept. All entries are contextualized with relevant text passages.
In view of the new entries and additional German definitions, the new edition is bound into two durable hardback volumes.
The Niermeyer Lexicon Minus has proved to be invaluable to medievalists for almost 50 years and is an indispensable working tool for academic libraries. An online version is also available: see for details http://www.brill.com/mlmo

The revised Lexicon is published simultaneously by Brill, Leiden and Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft (WBG), Darmstadt (WBG only distributes to its members).

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Shlomo Simonsohn

This volume in the series Documentary History of the Jews in Italy illustrates the history of the Jews in Sicily from 1415 to 1439. It is the sequel to the first three volumes and covers the events during the first half of the rule of King Alphonso the Magnanimous. The King took a personal interest in the affairs of the Jewish communities and exercised his authority through master Moyse Bonavogla, his personal physician, whom he appointed dienchelele, chief justice. During that period the Jewish minority of the island flourished economically and socially. Some 700 documents, many of them published here for the first time, record the fortunes of the Jews and their relationships with the authorities and their Christian neighbours. Much new information has come to light, and many facets of Jewish life in Sicily have been uncovered.
The abundance of historical records in the archives of the Crown and of local authorities compares favourably with the relative scarcity of surviving documentation in earlier centuries. Therefore, again, many documents had to be reported in summary form. The volume is again provided with additional bibliography and indexes, while the introduction has been relegated to the end of the series on the Jews of the island.

Albert of Saxony's Twenty-five Disputed Questions on Logic

A critical edition of his quaestiones circa logicam

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Fitzgerald

This critical edition of Albert of Saxony's 25 Questions on Logic is a set of Quaestiones Disputatae which treats issues of the Parva Logicalia such as: the nature of logic; the imposition, distribution, signification, and supposition of designating and non-designating terms; the truth and falsity, conversion, contradictoriness, and kinds of propositions; and problems involving the scope of negations.
The inclusion of several appendices of previously untranscribed and unedited material by Albert of Saxony, Ralph Strode, and John Buridan; together with Notes and an Index of concepts and an Albert Concordance keyed to paragraph numbers, make the book a most useful source of primary material for students and scholars.

Rotuli Parisienses

Supplications to the Pope from the University of Paris, Volume I: 1316-1349

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Edited by Courtenay

This volume contains a complete edition of the rotuli, or benefice supplications, sent to the papacy by masters at the University of Paris in the first half of the fourteenth century. It also contains the letters of provision, in abbreviated form, that resulted from those petitions, along with the letters that resulted from the numerous university supplications that have not survived. This edition represents the largest body of new documentation for the pre-fifteenth century University to appear since the publication of the Chartularium Universitatis Parisiensis at the end of the nineteenth century.
The edition is prefaced with a long introduction that describes the origin and history of the fourteenth-century innovation of collective supplications by universities, the method of recovering the results of lost rotuli for Paris, and the stages in the process of supplication from Paris, through the papal curia at Avignon, and back to Paris. The book concludes with an index of the names of scholars as well as a place-name index locating the parish and collegiate churches mentioned in the texts. Because the University of Paris submitted rotuli every two to three years, and because the petitions and letters contain abundant personal information, the texts provide a sequential picture of the Parisian professoriate across four decades before the Black Death.

Breviarium Urbis Romae Antiquae

editio altera stereotypa

Adrianus van Heck

First published in 1977, the Breviarium Urbis Romae Antiquae is a classic among the literary Rome guides for those who want to be guided by the classics on their walks through the Eternal City. It aims at providing the reader with a collection of texts giving the most important information on the building activities of the Roman aediles which can be drawn from Latin sources, covering a period of about eleven centuries. The texts have been arranged according to the division of Rome in fourteen regions and are grouped around a monument. This unique and charming booklet should be on the wish list of every classicist, archaeologist and art historian.

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Edited by Aza Goudriaan

This volume presents early criticisms of Descartes’ philosophy by Dutch Reformed theologian Jacobus Revius (1586-1658).
The book offers the Latin texts—originally printed in 1647—of five theological disputations held at the States College in Leiden, and of Revius’ work Methodi cartesianae consideratio theologica. The texts are preceded by an introduction. Earlier references to Descartes in Revius’ Suarez repurgatus (1643/4) are appended.
This edition makes available theological texts of a remarkable quality. Documenting his argument carefully from various writings of Descartes, Revius seeks especially to indicate where Cartesian philosophy is not consonant with Christian (Reformed) religion or where it is inconsistent. Various indexes enhance the usefulness of the edition.

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Edited by Berndt Hamm, Reinhold Friedrich and Andreas Puchta

Unlike most theologians of his age, Martin Bucer had a wide range of vision with respect to European affairs: In addition to his contacts within Alsace and Germany, he established relations with almost every country on the Continent. It was his ecumenical attitude that always led him to mediate between the parties in the religious battles of his time. His deep commitment and his objective to reach an agreement can be traced in all his activities, works and letters.
As Bucer did not found a religious denomination himself, his theological and historical importance has been underestimated for a long time. In addition his handwriting is hard to decipher, which makes it difficult to deal with his works, especially with his letters.
Bucer's letters (BCor) have been published in chronological order as part of the "Opera omnia" since 1979 (Leiden, Brill, I: 1979; II: 1989; III: 1995; IV: 2000). Since the editor, Jean Rott (Strasbourg), died Bucer's correspondence has been edited in Erlangen. This academic edition of source material will provide future research with a broad basis for significant aspects of Reformation history about which very little is known.

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Edited by Manual Santos Noya

Marsilius of Inghen, master of the Universities of Paris (1362-1378) and Heidelberg (1386-1396), is the author of a number of highly successful treatises on logic and natural philosophy which were read at many Late Medieval and Early Modern universities. The fruit of his mature thinking is a monumental commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, which he published shortly before his death in 1396. This huge piece of writing is now being critically edited for the first time by an international team of specialists. The second volume deals with questions of creation, the relation of the figures of the Trinity to one another, and of God to creatures.

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Edited by Manual Santos Noya

Marsilius of Inghen, master of the Universities of Paris (1362-1378) and Heidelberg (1386-1396), is the author of a number of highly successful treatises on logic and natural philosophy which were read at many Late Medieval and Early Modern universities. The fruit of his mature thinking is a monumental commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, which he published shortly before his death in 1396. This huge piece of writing is now being critically edited for the first time by an international team of specialists. The first volume provides a discussion of the nature of theology and deals with the logical and theological problems of the divine trinity.

Modern research can profit from the broad scope with which Marsilius addresses his topics. His arguments shed light on the discussion between nominalists and realists, allowing insight into the changing interests
of philosophy and theology, from the critical attitude of many 14th-century authors to the search for tradition which was characteristic of the 15th century. Marsilius adopts the logico-semantic approach of William of Ockham, Adam Wodeham, and Robert Holcot, while at the same time defending the traditional views of Thomas Aquinas and Bonaventure. Assimilating these different theories, his commentary reflects the multiform nature of its late medieval intellectual context.

The whole edition will cover seven volumes, including a separate volume with indices of the complete text and a bibliography of literature on Marsilius. Each volume will contain an introduction, an index of relevant names, and a subject index.

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Edited by Aafke M.I. van Oppenraaij

Aristotle's De Animalibus has been a very important source of zoological knowledge both for the ancient Greeks and for the medieval Arabs and Europeans. The work has twice been translated into Latin, once direct from the Greek by William of Moerbeke and once by Michael Scot from an existing Arabic translation. Of these, Scot's translation is the oldest. The De Animalibus is composed of three sections: 'History of Animals' (10 books), 'Parts of Animals' (4 books) and 'Generation of Animals' (5 books). The present volume contains the first critical edition of Scot's translation of the second section. The edition of the third section is already available (1992), the first section is in preparation.

Aristoteles Latinus

1-5. Categoriae vel Praedicamenta

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Edited by Minio-Paluello

Among the monumental projects taken up by classicists and medievalists in this century, the editions of the Greco-Latin versions of Aristotle collected in the series Aristoteles Latinus best display the great advances that have been made in editorial thoroughness and subtlety. The volumes confine themselves to presenting the texts, together with a discussion of their history and the history of earlier textual scholarship. The editions are models of clarity, availability and utility. After a gap of several years we are pleased to announce that this volume is now available again in reprint.
Aristotle's treatise on the most fundamental concepts of the human mind, called Categories or Predicaments, has been a basic textbook for Mediaeval philosophers and theologians. Boethius is the author of the oldest Latin translation known to us. However, from the end of the fourth century, there existed a Latin paraphrase of this text, due to a pupil of Themistius, but attributed to Augustin. A composite text, containing some elements of the Boethian version, circulated from the beginning of the ninth century.
All these texts were edited by L. Minio-Paluello, together with the translation of the complete text and the short lemma's of the Aristotelian treatise found in the copies of Moerbeke's version of Simplicius' commentary on the Categories. The preface to the edition unfolds and clarifies the complex situation of the manuscript tradition and tries to identify each of its components. The indexes include a Greek-Latin and Latin-Greek lexicon of the translations, as well as indexes of the Latin and the Greek words ocuurring in the Pseudo-Augustinian paraphrase.
The reprint of this standard edition of the Aristoteles Latinus, published in 1961, will be welcomed by scholars devoted to the history of Mediaeval logic and philosophy.

Aristoteles Latinus

1-3. Topica

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Aristoteles

Edited by Minio-Paluello

Aristoteles Latinus

6-7. Categoriarum Supplementa

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Edited by Minio-Paluello and Dod

As a supplement to the edition of the Latin translations of Aristotle's Categories, L. Minio-Paluello and B.G. Dod edited the Latin versions of two smaller books that were closely linked to the study of the Categories during the whole Middle Ages. Porphyry's Isagoge or Introduction was considered as preparatory to the Aristotelian Categories, and the so-called Liber sex principiorum was used as its complement, since it deals mainly with the last six categories, which are treated more briefly in Aristotle's work.
The edition thus contains basically two texts: Boethius' translation of Porphyry's Isagoge as well as the extant fragments of the fourth century translation of the same work, done by Marius Victorinus, and the Liber sex principiorum. The introduction clarifies the manuscript tradition of both works and discusses the origin of the Liber sex principiorum, which is in fact an extract of an anonymous twelfth century work, but has been attributed erroneously to Gilbertus Porretanus. In an appendix, specimens of some Renaissance versions of the Categories are given. The indexes include a Greek-Latin and Latin-Greek lexicon of Porphyry's Isagoge, as well as a Latin index to the Liber sex principiorum.
The reprint of this 1966 edition of the Aristoteles Latinus will be welcomed by all scholars devoted to the history of Mediaeval logic and philosophy.

Aristoteles Latinus

1-4. (2 et 3 editio altera) Analytica posteriora

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Edited by Minio-Paluello and Dod

One of Aristotle's most renowned and influential logical works is the Posterior Analytics, containing his theory on scientific demonstration. It was not known to Western scholars until the twelfth century, when it was translated three times within a span of 30 years. The most widespread translation goes back to James of Venice. It is justly called "vulgate", since it is preserved in about 300 manuscripts. Another version, ascribed to a certain "Ioannes", is extant in its entirety in only one manuscript. Thirdly, the Posterior Analytics was translated from Arabic by Gerard of Cremona. One century later, William of Moerbeke did a revision of James' translation.
This volume presents the critical edition of these four versions, which are described in the introduction. The appendix includes some specimens from printed editions of Averroes' commentary on the Posterior Analytics. The indexes contain a Greek-Latin and Latin-Greek lexicon of each of the three Greek-Latin translations and a Latin index of Gerard's version.
The reprint of this 1968 edition of Aristoteles Latinus will be welcomed by all scolars devoted to the history of Mediaeval logic and philosophy.

Beginnings and Discoveries: Polydore Vergil's De inventoribus rerum

An Unabridged Translation and Edition with Introduction, Notes and Glossary

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Beno Weiss and Louis C. Pérez

An unabridged translation and edition with introduction, notes and glossary. First publication of the integral text in the English language.

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Jacobson

One of the earliest and most important works of biblical interpretation is a Latin text that is commonly known as the Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum. It was written in the first second century C.E. and is thus a great source of illumination for the period and milieu out of which arose various Jewish sects and Christianity.
This book offers the Latin text of LAB, a dramatically new translation, a commentary that deals extensively with LAB's place in ancient biblical exegesis, and an introduction that treats the major problems associated with LAB (e.g. date, original language, manuscript tradition, exegetical techniques).
The author seeks to illuminate LAB in new ways by reconstructing the original Hebrew when that is useful, and by bringing new and pertinent evidence from the Bible, from Rabbinic literature, and from early Christian literature.

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With an introduction and indexes by H. Vanhulst.

Aristoteles Latinus

Metaphysica, Vol. 3

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Edited by Vuillemin-Diem

This volume presents the last and only complete Mediaeval Latin translation of Aristotle's Metaphysics, partly a revision of an older version, partly an original translation, both done by the Flemish Dominican William of Moerbeke in the 13th century. Widely distributed, it has been preserved in more than 200 manuscripts. For the first time in the history of the Latin Aristotle, a still existing Greek manuscript has proved to be the main source used by the translator and contains notes in his hand: the famous 9th-century Codex Vindobonensis phil. gr. 100.
The preface unfolds and clarifies the various problems related to the text: Moerbeke's authorship, the text tradition, the Greek sources (among which, besides the text, an intriguing Greek scholion translated by Moerbeke), the two successive stages of the translation — both used in the commentary of Thomas Aquinas —, and the criteria according to which the critical text has been established.
The edition itself, followed by a complete Greek-Latin and Latin-Greek index, provides historians of Mediaeval philosophy with one of the most important Aristotelian texts in the Latin tradition, and will be an indispensable tool for scholarly work in this field.

Edited by Lacombe, Birkenmajer, Dulong, Franceschini and Minio-Paluello

In the years 1961-1972 Marie-Thérèse d'Alverny published in Archives d'Histoire Doctrinale et Littéraire du Moyen Age 11 fascicles of a study of the codicological tradition of the Latin Avicenna. In these she identifies and describes more than 150 Latin manuscripts of the Avicennan corpus preserved in European libraries, thus laying the foundation for work later published in the Avicenna Latinus series. These fascicles are photomechanically reprinted here, together with hitherto unpublished material concerning another 30 manuscripts compiled from Professor d'Alverny's papers by Simone van Riet and Pierre Jodogne. The compilers have also added a list of corrigenda as well as an index of manuscripts discussed and an index of names and works.

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Edited by Alice E. Wilson

When the volume Poetae Tres Elegantissimi was produced at Paris in 1582, the poets included were Joannes Secundus, Michelle Marullo and Girolamo Angeriano, represented by his best-known work, the Eropaegnion, orginally published in Florence in 1512, which had come to enjoy particular popularity in France and had exercised a considerable influence on vernacular literature there. All 199 poems (with the few alternative versions) are assembled from the various sixteenth century editions in a newly edited Latin text. Each poem translated into English prose; substantial commentary.

Johannes Cochlaeus, Philippicae I-VII (2 Vols.)

Edited with Introduction and Commentary

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Edited by Ralph Keen

The Philippics – originally published between 1534 and 1549 – were directed against the Reformation, and notably against Philipp Melanchthon.
I. Text
II. Introduction – Commentary – Bibliography – Appendices

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Edited by Haijo Jan Westra

This critical edition presents the only complete, later medieval Latin commentary on the first two books of Martianus Capella's influential handbook of the Seven Liberal Arts. Using his allegorical interpretation of the programmatic marriage of Mercury (eloquence) and Philology (learning) as a speculative, proto-scientific method of inquiry, the commentator provides encyclopedic coverage of medieval philosophy, theology, science, myth, language, literature and education. Intellectually the author is still connected with early scholasticism and the “School of Chartres,” being more sympathetic to Neoplatonism than to the newly arrived Aristotelianism. He is particularly interested in the role of good works which he sees revealed sub integumento in the function of Iuno in the Capitoline trinity. The commentary seems to have been designed with a reading audience and a reference in mind. The present edition has been keyed to Dick's as well as Willis' editions of Martianus Capella.

Belgica Typographica, 1541-1600 (4 Vols.)

Catalogus librorum impressorum ab anno MDXLI (1541) ad annum MDC (1600) in regionibus quae nunc Regni Belgarum partes sunt

Series:

Elly Cockx-Indestege

A short-title catalogue of altogether 9.755 Belgian editions 1541-1600 in the Royal Library, Brussels and in 93 other Belgian libraries. Numerous cross references. Introductions trilingual (Dutch, French, English). The work is enhanced with very extensive Indices (vol. IV).

Lexicon Latinitatis Nederlandicae Medii Aevi

Volume V. L-M-N-O (Fasc. 35-42)

Series:

Fuchs, Weijers and Gumbert-Hepp

Avicenna Latinus

Liber primus naturalium

Series:

Edited by van Riet and Verbeke

This is the first volume of a new trilogy, which will deal with that part of the Shifā’ which concerns physics and natural philosophy, in Latin the Liber primus naturalium.
One part of the Liber primus naturalium, which was translated into Latin towards the end of the 12th century, gave rise to the Tractatus primus de causis et principiis naturalium and to the Tractatus secundus de motu et consimilibus, whilst another part translated towards the end of the 13th century produced a Tractatus tertius de his quae habent naturalia ex hoc quod habent quantitatem.
The Tractatus primus de causis et principiis naturalium, now published, contains like all the other volumes in the series, a doctrinal introduction by Professor G. Verbeke, and an historical and critical apparatus, all prepared by Simone van Riet.
The Arabic-Latin and Latin-Arabic lexica will be published separately in a single volume, after publication of the three Tractatus has been completed.

Mediae latinitatis lexicon minus

Lexique latin médiéval-français/anglais. A Medieval Latin-French/English Dictionary.

Niermeyer

First published in 1976 and then reprinted in 1984, the Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus — A Medieval Latin French/English Dictionary — has proved to be invaluable to medievalists and a precious work tool for academic libraries.

Series:

Jennings

Since the publication of Th. Charland's Artes Praedicandi in 1936, several significant studies of the rise and development of Arts of Preaching have appeared. There are, however, a few aspects of both classical and medieval traditions surrounding these artes which have not been featured in earlier critiques and which contribute to an appreciation of the form, namely: the changing concept of the word "ars", the dialectical/logical emphasis of the schoolmen, and most importantly, the great pastoral movement of the high Middle Ages which can be posited as the ultimate impetus for an art's composition. The latter phenomenon separates the artes praedicandi from the artes dictaminis and poeticae and gives perspective on the shaping influences in preaching tradition. Finally, the specifically Higden material focuses attention on his singularly well-made manual for the construction of a thematic sermon, the Ars componendi sermones.

Series:

Edited by Unterkircher

This work is a description by the priest Hugh of Liège of his experiences on a pilgrimage in a work which he calls Peregrinarius Hugonis. Taken partly from real life and partly fantasized, it is entirely written in Latin couplets.
The final destination of this pilgrimage is never mentioned, but it might have been Rome. On his journey, the Muses appear to Hugh and demand that he write letters to the Kings of England and France, and to the Pope. The letters lead to a grand Peace Conference and an end to the 100-Years War which had recently begun (1342). The work contains countless cameos, interspersed between the letters, from the author's private life and fantasy world, and together they present the author with the chance to air all his knowledge of theology, natural science and medicine.
The Peregrinarius is a colourful representation of the manners of its time. It shows how power politics was viewed by a man of the people, and what cures he had to offer against its evils. All in all, an entertaining book in a Latin, which if not exactly classical, is any event well-composed and easy to follow.

Aristoteles Latinus

1-2. Physica

Series:

Edited by Bossier and Brams

Aristotle's main physical treatise was one of the standard books which deeply influenced Western Science and philosophy. From the twelfth century onwards it was translated several times into Latin during the Middle Ages and it was read and commented upon constantly in schools and universities. Five medieval Latin versions have been preserved, two translated from the Arabic and three directly from the Greek. The Arab-Latin versions were made by Gerard of Cremona in the twelfth Century and Michael Scot in the thirteenth Century. The oldest Greek-Latin translation was elaborated by James of Venice in the first half of the twelfth Century: it is the first known Latin text of the Physics. It was revised by William of Moerbeke in the second half of the thirteenth Century.
The third known Greek-Latin version, dating back to about 1200, is the anonymous and incomplete Translatio Vaticana, edited by A. Mansion in 1957; it is the only version published thus far in the Aristoteles Latinus series (Vol. II 2).
The forthcoming edition will contain the Translatio vetus: this text basically goes back to James of Venice, but was known in the Middle Ages in different redactions. The edited text is that of our oldest and best witness: ms. Avranches, Bibl. mun. 221 (Af); the variant readings proper to other traditions, however, are also mentioned, both in the apparatus and the indices.
The preface, written in French, gives a detailed description of the manuscript tradition and of the two main types of text it contains. It will also discuss the relation between the Physica vetus and the Physica Vaticana. A photo-mechanical reprint of the Physica Vaticana edition will be available together with the edition of the Physica vetus.

Lexicon Latinitatis Nederlandicae Medii Aevi

Volume IV. F-I (Fasc. 26-34)

Series:

Fuchs, Weijers and Gumbert-Hepp

Avicenna Latinus

Liber quartus naturalium

Series:

Edited by van Riet and Verbeke

Series:

Edited by Ralph Keen

This tract, a defence of the faith of the English people, was originally published in 1526. The present new text-edition has a parallel English translation. It is preceded by an Introduction and followed by a Commentary, two Appendices and an Index.

Avicenna Latinus

Liber tertius naturalium

Series:

Edited by van Riet and Verbeke

Aristoteles Latinus

1. De Generatione et Corruptione

Series:

Judycka

Lexicon Latinitatis Nederlandicae Medii Aevi

Volume III. D-E (Fasc. 17-25)

Series:

Fuchs, Weijers and Gumbert-Hepp

Edited by Koehler and Baumgartner

Wörterbuch zum hebräischen Alten Testament in deutscher und englischer Sprache / A Dictionary of the Hebrew Old Testament in English and German — W. Baumgartner, Wörterbuch zum aramäischen Teil des Alten Testaments in deutscher und englischer germanico-hebraicum (-aramaicum) et correctiones additamentaque i.a. continens. Ediderunt L. Koehler et W. Baumgartner Sprache / A Dictionary of the Aramaic Parts of the Old Testament in English and German. Cui adjectum est:
Supplementum ad Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros. Lexicon