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In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
In: James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States, 1928-38
Author: Brigita Orel

Abstract

According to Homi Bhabha, hybridity in the context of identity where two cultures or languages collide is a third space where new views and stances can emerge. I explored the concept of this third space by writing a novel in English, which is my second language, instead of in my mother tongue, Slovenian. I investigated the effects of language switch on my choice of subject matter, my writing process, and my perception of my work and myself as a writer and as a person. I examined language-related challenges of writing in my second language, the benefits of a new insight a second language offers, and how multilingualism leads to a more fluid identity and a change in perspective.

In: Logos
Author: Sarah Bennett

Abstract

Launched in 1999, at a time of radical change for the publishing industry, Persephone Books has become a successful independent publisher of neglected female authors mainly from the 20th-century inter-war period. Publishing being an industry primarily shaped by the differential distribution of symbolic and economic capital (Bourdieu, ‘The Market for Symbolic Goods’, in The Rules of Art, Polity Press, 1996, p. 9), competing principles of cultural legitimacy within an increasingly commercial climate clarify the position of modern publishing at the intersection of culture and commerce (Bourdieu, The Field of Cultural Production, Columbia University Press, 1993, p. 27). This article explores how Persephone Books’ understated assertion of publishing’s ‘middle ground’ and commitment to the historically reviled ‘middlebrow’ genre have reconciled the perennial tension between culture and commerce to create a thriving yet unintentional publishing brand.

In: Logos