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Chapter 5 Characteristics of Chinese Teachers’ Belief Systems
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 4 Complex Dynamic Systems Theory as a Theoretical Framework to Study Beliefs and Practice of EFL Reading Teachers
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 8 Conclusion: A CDST Model to Study Language Teacher Beliefs and Practices
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 6 Exploring Interaction between Reading Beliefs and Reading Teaching Beliefs in Dominant Orientations
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 1 Introduction
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 7 The Nexus of Chinese EFL Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 3 Paradigm Shifts in Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices
Chapter 2 Revisiting the Messy Construct
Author: Yang Gao
In: EFL Teachers’ Beliefs about Reading and Reading Teaching versus Actual Practices

Abstract

Early transitions are on the rise across global and national contexts. However, resources informing teachers and families about best practices concerning infants, especially infant transitions from home to early childhood settings, are almost non-existent. In this article, the authors share the outcomes of an experiment that translated research from an International Study of the Social and Emotional Experiences of Early Transitions (isseet) project into a range of visual resources for this audience. They created a suite of video, infographic and meme visual resources that outlined ‘what works’ for quality early transitions and sought end-user feedback around their utility. While the feedback was positive overall concerning infographics and videos, end-users expressed strong negative responses to the use of memes. In the article that follows, the authors explore why it might be so. They draw on the Bakhtinian concept of genre. With its form, content and strategic orientation, they translate and interpret the meaning ascribed to the memes. They argue that the complex humour and cultural memory that sit behind memes grants them unique translation status. Reflecting on the responses, the authors consider pathways for memes as impactful research translation for end-users – in this case, early years teachers.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In ethnopharmacology, scientists often survey indigenous communities to identify and collect natural remedies such as medicinal plants that are yet to be investigated pharmacologically in a laboratory setting. The Nagoya Protocol provided international agreements on financial benefit sharing. However, what has yet only been poorly defined in these agreements are the non-financial benefits for local intellectual property right owners, such as traditional healers who originally provided the respective ethnomedicinal information. Unfortunately, ethnopharmacologists still rarely return to local communities. In this video article, the authors present a method for transferring results back to traditional healers in rural indigenous communities, taking the authors’ previous studies among 39 traditional healers in Uganda as an example. The authors’ approach is based on a two-day workshop, and the results are presented as original footage in the video article. The authors’ work demonstrated a successful method for ensuring bidirectional benefit and communication while fostering future scientific and community-work collaborations. The authors believe it is the moral duty of ethnopharmacologists to contribute to knowledge transfer and feedback once a study is completed. The workshop method, as an example for science outreach, might also be regarded as a valuable contribution to research on education theory and science communication.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy