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This book contains twenty essays on Italian Renaissance humanism, universities, and Jesuit education in three equal parts. The book defines Renaissance humanism, then studies biblical humanism, humanistic education in Venice, the pioneering historian of humanism Georg Voigt, and Paul Oskar Kristeller. The middle section discusses Italian universities, the sports played by university students, a famous law professor, and the controversy over the immortality of the soul. The last section analyses Jesuit education: the culture of the Jesuit teacher, the philosophy curriculum, attitudes toward Erasmus and Juan Luis Vives, and the education of a cardinal.
This volume collects Paul Grendler's most recent research (published and unpublished), offering to the reader a broad fresco on a complex and crucial age in the history of education.
This volume includes English translations of articles selected from Blue Book of Chinese Education 2017, 2018 and 2019. It reviews China’s education development from 2016 to 2018. A total of 16 chapters in this volume cover a wide variety of topics on education in China, including equity, quality, governance, access, law and regulations on privately-run schools, basic education, higher education, special education, among others. The contributors include both scholars as well as practitioners who have first-hand experience and insight on China’s education. The volume presents to the reader articles in different formats, such as academic discussions, survey reports, and case studies.
This volume, created by seventeen interdisciplinary authors, brings together pioneering practices that introduce arts into education in Japan. The field of research ranges from kindergarten, primary and secondary school to liberal arts and postgraduate courses at university. The chapters cover both formal and informal settings, such as museums and after school programs. The genres of art include visual art, performance, dance, vocal music, and drama.

Arts-based or arts-inspired methods help students’ artistic inquiry through creative or performative practices, leading to new findings that might not otherwise be described. Artistic practice makes students reflect on their own bodies, emotions, feelings, ways of life, and relationships with others, which leads to creative thinking.

The volume is based on three new trends in art and education: 1) The development of Arts-Based Research in Japan since its introduction from abroad; 2) The introduction of art practice into academic research in various disciplines and diverse educational settings; and 3) The new trend in drama education and theatrical performance in Japan.

Each chapter inspires and provokes discussion among researchers and practitioners in various educational settings on the future direction of art education in Japan and around the world.
The book reflects on the extent to which the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic influenced the education system in Africa, notably South Africa. The advent of the pandemic has brought a new context to the challenges of access, deepening the precarious position of African higher education systems. The pandemic underscored that African higher education systems are fragile and not uniformly resilient. The book discusses the challenges created or further entrenched by COVID-19 and how the typology of inequality across the differentiated institutions impacted the management of education delivery during COVID-19. Per se, lessons learned were documented to inform decision-making and practice while drawing conclusions for future usage. Even though the shift to emergency remote teaching was not foreseen and thus not coordinated, the authors argue that students’ learning styles, perceptions of online learning and digital pedagogy should be considered in the post-COVID-19 curricula development processes.
Theory and Practice of Values and Knowledge Education
"Values without knowledge are blind, while knowledge without values is irresponsible." This principle underlines the motivation to write this book. It presents V aKE – Values and Knowledge Education, a theoretical model based on constructivist learning theories, and many examples for its practical implementation in diverse educational fields. Thanks to its extensive theoretical foundation, the model opens up almost unlimited possibilities to tailor the course to the needs of the participants and to the dynamics of a process.

The justification of ethical values is attributed a general importance for the development of personality as well as for the thriving and flourishing living with each other in a society. School education aims at providing respective knowledge. However, this knowledge is separated from the subject matters, whereas for its application in daily life both – knowledge on facts as well as on values – are necessary and indispensable for evaluation, assessment and decision making.
Usable Pasts addresses projects dating to two periods in the United States that saw increased financial support from the state for socially engaged culture. By analysing artworks dating to the 1990s by Suzanne Lacy, Rick Lowe and Martha Rosler in relation to experimental theatre, modern dance, and photography produced within the leftist Cultural Front of the 1930s, this book unpicks the mythic and material afterlives of the New Deal in American cultural politics in order to write a new history of social practice art in the United States. From teenage mothers organising exhibitions that challenged welfare reform, to communist dance troupes choreographing their struggles as domestic workers, Usable Pasts addresses the aesthetics and politics of these attempts to transform society through art in relation to questions of state formation.
Collaborative engagement between activist academics from Israel and Northern Ireland highlighted the challenges and potential of working through education to promote shared learning and shared life in divided societies. Following these initial explorations, the volume brought together educationalists from Europe, the United States and South Africa to widen the range of experience and insights, and broaden the base of the conversation. The result is this book on the role of shared education, not only in deeply divided societies, but also in places where minorities face discrimination, where migrants face prejudice and barriers, or where society fails to deal positively with cultural diversity. Together, the contributors challenged themselves to develop theoretical and practical paradigms, based on practical knowledge and experience, to promote activist pedagogies. Their shared purpose was to work for more humane, just and democratic societies, in which education offers genuine hope for sustained transformational change.

The four main themes around which the book is organized are: educating for democratic-multicultural citizenship, models of shared learning, nurturing intercultural competencies, and reconciling dialogue in the face of conflicting narratives. The book draws on a wide range of international perspectives and insights to identify practical strategies for change in local contexts.