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Reihe:

Ediert von Julie Allan, Jenny OzgaundGeri Smith

Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity is a response to the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals in attempting to manage an increasingly diverse population, whilst simultaneously being subjected to public scrutiny through measures of performance.
Social capital has increasingly been seen by policy makers and academics as a possible resource for education, allowing children and young people, and the professionals who work with them, to do better as a result of having strong networks, relationships and trust. There has, however, been little attention to how social capital might actually be used by professionals within educational contexts or to the benefits of enhanced social capital for children and young people, their families, and the professionals themselves.
The contributors to this volume provide commentaries on what is known about social capital and its use in educational contexts; the engagement of teachers and other professionals with diversity; and social capital and diversity among children, young people and families.
Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity will appeal to teacher educators and policymakers with concerns about the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals and with an interest in how social capital might enable an effective response to diversity in educational contexts. The book will be of particular interest and use to student and beginning teachers in responding to diversity as they develop their own professional identities and to practising teachers with an interest in pursuing new forms of professional renewal.

We've Scene it All Before

Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training

Reihe:

Brian C. Johnson

A revolutionary tool for corporate and academic trainers, We’ve Scene It All Before harnesses the power of mainstream Hollywood film to enhance educational sessions about diversity and social justice. This resource manual offers practical guidance on how to effectively use the concept of difference as a starting point towards true inclusion.
Seasoned and novice trainers will appreciate the suggested strategies and best practices on facilitating diversity dialogues, which are coupled with a set of twenty-five definitions that introduce and raise awareness of the personal and systemic nature of difference, discrimination, and power. Workshops on human relations and workplace diversity must move beyond the superficial “celebration” of diversity to the dismantling of systems of privilege and oppression that create environments where members of the organization are disenfranchised and disempowered.
Using clips from a variety of genres of mainstream film allows the trainer to make intercultural concepts visible and offers a way for us to challenge our own values and assumptions. Participants will enjoy the presentations more as they view some of their favorite films in a whole new way; using this familiar medium creates a common basis for entering the discussions all the while giving us the permission to talk about serious and often controversial subjects.
We’ve Scene It All Before: Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training is a learning tool which will be tremendously useful in reducing resistance and increasing thoughtful cross-cultural dialogue.

Challenges for Inclusion

Educational and Social Studies From Britain and the Indian Sub-Continent

Ediert von Christopher Adam BagleyundGajendra K. Verma

This book reviews current controversies and dilemmas in the educational and social development of children and adolescents in Britain, India, Bangladesh and Nepal. Britain is contrasted with the Indian Sub-Continent because in theory at least, Britain has policies which should enable young people to be fully integrated within the educational system, whatever the degree of their original disability, while in the Indian Sub-Continent such educational opportunities are denied to many children because of problems of social structure, values, and poverty. The rights of the disabled to full inclusion are emphasized in two chapters by Sharon Rustemier. But a chapter by Dame Mary Warnock whose report to government designed the system for educational inclusion, shows that British policies for inclusion of the disabled are not working. The chapter by Bagley outlines the 'poverty of education' in Britain, which means that in a highly stratified society many children—both poor and disabled - are excluded from mainstream education by decisions based on school policies and neighbourhood disadvantage.
India in contrast is a culture in which inclusion of the disabled within educational systems is marred by economic poverty, as well as deliberate policies which deny Dalits (formerly known as 'Untouchables’) access to many kinds of educational opportunity. Nevertheless, there are pockets of good practice in India including the legal framework for action, which chapters by Jha and Jaya identify.
The history of educational initiatives for social and educational of the very poor of Bangladesh are reviewed in detail since these initiatives illustrate the work of a unique NGO (BRAC—the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee) which offers advancement for the poorest of the poor in a nation that is significantly poorer than India. Nepal too is also one of the poorest nations on earth, and we offer a detailed account of the trafficking of women and girls from Nepal into Indian brothels. These girls are permanently excluded from all social and educational networks, and their plight poses a major challenge for the movement for the social and educational inclusion of all children.

The Construction of Disability in our Schools

Teacher and Parent perspectives on the experience of labelled students

Reihe:

Kathryn Underwood

This book is about the meaning of disability in schools. The experience of children with disabilities in schools has undergone substantial change over the last twenty years (and more) with many children who would have once been living in institutions now going to school alongside their peers. With this monumental shift and the continuing increased participation of people with disabilities, one might wonder what disability means. In the age of institutionalisation disability referred to those people who were not able to actively participate in society. As it turns out, many of the people who were deemed unable to participate were so only because the society in which they lived had kept them from active participation through institutionalisation. In Ontario, Canada, where the author lives and works, many adults with disabilities continue to live in institutions and are also active in their communities. So it is not just the institutions that “disable” people. There are many reasons that people fall into the classification of “disabled” and for some this classification begins in an institution, often in the institution of school. This book explores the different beliefs that teachers and parents hold about disability and the types of barriers that cause disability, and how these beliefs translate into education practice.

Doing Inclusive Education Research

Foreword by Michael Apple

Reihe:

Julie AllanundRoger Slee

Those attempting to research inclusive education face an enormous challenge. Not only is it a highly complex field, but it is also fraught with tensions, sometimes spilling into over into disputes between researchers over ideology. Research textbooks present research decision-making as relatively straightforward and offer little help to students and novice researchers on how to navigate complex fields such as inclusive education or understand ideology. Doing Inclusive Education Research is an attempt to lift the lid on the processes of doing research and uncovers the experiences of key researchers in the field. Len Barton, Mike Oliver, David Gillbourn, Deborah Youdell, Stephen Ball, Ellen Brantlinger, Sally Tomlinson, Mel Ainscow, Lani Florian, Alan Dyson, Suzanne Carrington, Ken Kavale, Karen Harris and Kim Cornish have all opened themselves up to scrutiny and reveal the decisions and choices they made at different points of the research process, as well as some of their concerns as they undertook the work. They also respond to the invitation to discuss the positioning of their work and offer their ‘take’ on the ideological battles. Students and all involved in researching inclusive education will find Doing inclusive education research an indispensable, as well as fascinating, insight into the research process and will gain useful advice on how to engage with this complex field.