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China, East Asia and the European Union

Strong Economics, Weak Politics?

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Edited by Tjalling Halbertsma and Jan van der Harst

In China, East Asia and the European Union specialist authors from both Europe and Asia reflect on the dynamic relationship between the three actors from an International Relations perspective. The book is a testimony to China’s seemingly unstoppable rise, both in the East Asian region and in the relationship with the EU and its member states. The authors investigate why the economic links between the European Union and East Asia have become so firmly established, while in comparison the political bond has remained underdeveloped. They conclude that the crises the EU is currently facing seriously affect its manoeuvring space vis-a-vis China and its neighbours, both economically and politically.


Contributors are: Ding Chun, Neil Duggan, Enrico Fardella, Frank Gaenssmantel, Tjalling Halbertsma, Daniel R Hammond, Jan van der Harst, Elisa Hörhager, Jing Jing, Werner Pascha, Sanne Kamerling, David Kerr, Silja Keva, Christopher K. Lamont, Li Junyang, Feng Liu, Maaike Okano-Heijmans, Nadya Stoynova, and Herman Voogsgeerd.

History of Korean Modern Retailing

Repressed Consumption and Retail Industry, Perceived Equality and Economic Growth

Jong-Hyun Yi

In History of Korean Modern Retailing Jong-Hyun Yi shows how the Korean retail industry has developed since the 1970s, focusing on the relationship among government, consumers and retail companies, especially the department store. While generally it is said that underdevelopment of the Korean retail industry in the 1970s was attributed to economic immaturity, he argues it was artificially formed by strong consumption repression by the government. He also examines how consumption repression contributed to economic growth. Such initial condition in developmental period is a crucial factor to explain other distinctions like explosive growth and remarkably short heyday of the department store afterward.

With this, Jong-Hyun Yi traces the correlation between economic growth and stratification of the consumption since the 1970s. He proves that equality or inequality of consumption is a more influential factor for economic growth than that of income.

Chinese Research Perspectives on Population and Labor, Volume 2

From Demographic Dividend to Institutional Dividend

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Edited by Fang Cai and Meiyan Wang

This English-language volume is an edited collection of articles selected from the 2013 Chinese-language volume of the Green Book of Population and Labor. This volume starts with an overview report on a nationwide survey on migrant workers in 2012, conducted by the Household Survey Office at the National Bureau of Statistics. This survey report provides information on the size, movements, employment, housing and social security situation of migrant workers in China. Other topics discussed in this volume include labor supply and policies, household registration system reform, employment policies and social protection of “vulnerable” groups in China. Like other volumes in the series, this volume intends to draw lessons from the experiences and discuss trends of the labor market in China.

Chinese Research Perspectives on Population and Labor is a co-publication between Brill and Social Sciences Academic Press (China).

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Edited by Peilin LI, Guangjin CHEN and Yi ZHANG

Chinese Research Perspectives on Society, (the former China Society Yearbook) Volume 2 continues the tradition of presenting the findings of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences’ subject research group for the “Analysis and Forecast of the Social Situation” in China. This volume includes analyses of some important social issues in China for 2011-2013, including the urban-rural income and its reform; new development in Chinese social security; reform and development of medical and healthcare industries; living and health issues of the senior population; and employment difficulties, among others.
Written by contributors from professional research and survey organizations, universities, and related governmental sections, Chinese Research Perspective on Society, Volume 2 provides an excellent resource for those interested in current societal changes in China.

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Edited by Emiko Ochiai and Leo Aoi Hosoya

This volume, the first major study in its field, offers an invaluable stepping-stone to a more informed understanding of the fundamental social changes taking place in Asia – defined as ‘a reconstruction of the intimate and public spheres’. Such changes are being observed worldwide, but previous studies relating to this phenomenon are largely based on Western experiences dating back to the 1970s. Developments in Asia, however, are manifesting both similarities and differences between the two regions.

The book’s strongest appeal, therefore, lies in its theoretical orientation, seeking to define frameworks that are most relevant to the Asian reality. These frameworks include compressed and semi-compressed modernity, familialism, familialization policy, unsustainable society, the second demographic dividend, care diamonds, and the transnational public sphere. Such concepts are seen as essential in any discussion concerning the intimate and public spheres of contemporary Asia. Accordingly, Transformation of the Intimate and the Public in Asian Modernity can be seen as a valuable text as well as a work of reference and will be welcomed by social scientists and cultural anthropologists alike.

The book comprises an in-depth introduction and ten chapters contributed by scholars from Japan, Korea, Thailand and Canada covering topics ranging from low fertility, changing life course, increasing non-regular employment, care provision, migrant workers, social policies, and family law, to the activities of transnational NGOs, with a special focus on distinctive features of Asian experiences.

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Mingyuan Gu

Cultural Foundations of Chinese Education describes the evolution of Chinese education for more than 5,000 years, and analyzes in depth its interaction with Chinese culture. From the Imperial Civil Examinations to the Western Learning; from the transplant of Western systems of education to the New Democratic Education Movement; from the copying of the Soviet experience in education to the explorations for approaches to establish new education in China since the Economic Reforms in the late 1970s, this book provides unique analyses on conflicting elements in Chinese education, and leads to the understanding of the issues in modernizing education in China.

With condensed and concentrated analyses on the process of historical evolution and the interactions between Chinese education and Chinese cultural traditions, this book can be used as a major reference for international readers to understand education in China from the perspective of cultural evolution.

Rewriting Shangri-La

Tibetan Youth, Migrations and Literacies in McLeod Ganj, India

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Heidi Swank

In Rewriting Shangri-La: Migrations and Everyday Literacies among Tibetan Youth in McLeod Ganj, India, Heidi Swank examines differing histories of migration and exile through the lens of everyday literacies. The youth on whom this ethnography focuses live in a community that has long been romanticized by Tibetans and non-Tibetans alike, positioning these youth to see themselves as keepers of a modern day Shangri-la.
Through this ethnography - based on a decade of research - Heidi Swank suggests that through seemingly mundane writings (grocery lists, text messages, etc.) these youth are shifting what Shangri-la means by renogotiating important aspects of life in this Tibetan community to better match their lived - not romanticized - experiences as exiles in rural India.

Chinese Activism of a Different Kind

The Chinese Students' Campaign to Stay in Australia

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Gao Jia

In Chinese Activism of a Different Kind, Jia Gao examines the social behavior and patterns of actions of 45,000 or so Chinese students as they fought to obtain the right to stay permanently in Australia after the June 4 'Tiananmen Square' incident of 1989.
In a time of relative Internet infancy their response to the shifting stances of the Australian government saw them build networks, make use of media and develop a range of strategies. In achieving success this diverse group of students became the largest intake of onshore asylum seekers in the history of Australian immigration. Through their testimonies Jia Gao provides a fascinating addition to our knowledge of Chinese activism and to the history of Chinese migration.

The Art of Symbolic Resistance

Uyghur Identities and Uyghur-Han Relations in Contemporary Xinjiang

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Joanne N. Smith Finley

Against the background of the Ürümchi riots (July 2009), this book provides a longitudinal study of contemporary Uyghur identities and Uyghur-Han relations. Previous studies considered China’s Uyghurs from the perspective of the majority Han (state or people). Conversely, The Art of Symbolic Resistance considers Uyghur identities from a local perspective, based on interviews conducted with group members over nearly twenty years. Smith Finley rejects assertions that the Uyghur ethnic group is a ‘creation of the Chinese state’, suggesting that contemporary Uyghur identities involve a complex interplay between long-standing intra-group socio-cultural commonalities and a more recently evolved sense of common enmity towards the Han. This book advances the discipline in three senses: from a focus on sporadic violent opposition to one on everyday symbolic resistance; from state to ‘local’ representations; and from a conceptualisation of Uyghurs as ‘victim’ to one of ‘creative agent’.

Series:

Edited by Eldar Bråten

Embedded Entrepreneurship examines the importance of cultural meaning in the creation and utilization of economic value. Based on case-studies from Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia, the authors demonstrate that micro-scale entrepreneurship is intertwined with prevailing conceptions, moralities and habituations in the entrepreneurs’ social milieu. More specifically, the volume argues that meaning-making is integral to economic opportunity; that economic actors’ market agency is shaped by cultural experiences; that entrepreneurs' prototypical “individualism” is socially contingent; and that cultural meanings channel economic value among economic and social domains. Addressing core questions about “embedding”, the authors suggest theoretical convergences between economic anthropology and economic sociology.
Contributors include: Signe Howell, Ingrid Rudie, Leif Manger, Olaf H. Smedal, Frode F. Jacobsen, Kristianne Ervik, Anette Fagertun, Lars Gjelstad, Nils Hidle, Anja Lillegraven, Solgunn Olsen and Ingvild Solvang.