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Arts, Creativities, and Learning Environments in Global Perspectives aims at investigating the encounters that can occur between the arts and creativities in various learning environments and cultural contexts. The series intends to explore the multiplicity of these approaches by presenting perspectives from diverse learning environments, not solely formal institutions like schools, universities, academies, and colleges, but also non-formal ones (cultural institutions, libraries, museums, theatres, orchestras, archives, organisations, and work-places) or informal ones (play and games, community projects, amateur art, and clubs). This means that a pluralistic view on the artS – indeed, plural – is being embraced by including artistic expressions from all genres and artistic encounters at all levels, including the arts-based, artist-led, arts-inspired, arts-integrated. We encourage contributions from all over the world, in order to challenge a well-established Western-centred understanding of creativity and art (singular). This series will strongly support global perspectives, cross-cultural studies, critical theories, creative dissemination and a broader re-framing of the role of the arts for learning and for society.

Critical Storytelling in Millennial Times

Undergraduates Share Their Stories of Struggle

Series:

Edited by Carmella J. Braniger and Kaytlin M. Jacoby

Critical stories are more than just anecdotes or tales. They are narratives that raconter, or recount, the author’s own experiences, situating them in broader cultural contexts. Just as the autoethnographer situates the self in relation to the “others” of which the self is both a part and from which it is distinct, the critical storyteller situates his or her story of conflict in relation to the broader reality from which the conflict arises. The key is the reality that is being related and the perspective from which it is being shared.

In Critical Storytelling in Millennial Times, marginalized, excluded, and oppressed people share insights from their liminality and help readers learn from their perspectives and experiences. Examples of stories in this volume range from undergraduate perspectives on financial aid for college students, to narratives on first-hand police brutality, to heartbreaking tales about addiction, bullying, and the child sex trade in Cambodia. Undergraduate authors relate their stories and pose important questions to the reader about inciting change for the future. Follow along in their journeys and learn what you can do to make a change in your own reality.

Contributors are: Ben Brawner, Dwight Brown, Bryce Cherry, Kaytlin Jacoby, Jimmy Kruse, Dean Larrick, Bric Martin, Kara Niles, Claire Parrish, Grace Piper, Claire Prendergast, Alexsenia Ralat, Alec Reyes, Stephanie Simon, S. H. Suits, Katy Swift, Morgan Vogels, and Brittany Walsh.

The Five Continents of Theatre

Facts and Legends about the Material Culture of the Actor

Series:

Eugenio Barba and Nicola Savarese

The Five Continents of Theatre undertakes the exploration of the material culture of the actor, which involves the actors’ pragmatic relations and technical functionality, their behaviour, the norms and conventions that interact with those of the audience and the society in which actors and spectators equally take part.

The material culture of the actor is organised around body-mind techniques (see A Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology by the same authors) and auxiliary techniques whose variety concern:

■ the diverse circumstances that generate theatre performances: festive or civil occasions, celebrations of power, popular feasts such as carnival, calendar recurrences such as New Year, spring and summer festivals; ■ the financial and organisational aspects: costs, contracts, salaries, impresarios, tickets, subscriptions, tours; ■ the information to be provided to the public: announcements, posters, advertising, parades; ■ the spaces for the performance and those for the spectators: performing spaces in every possible sense of the term; ■ sets, lighting, sound, makeup, costumes, props; ■ the relations established between actor and spectator; ■ the means of transport adopted by actors and even by spectators.

Auxiliary techniques repeat themselves not only throughout different historical periods, but also across all theatrical traditions. Interacting dialectically in the stratification of practices, they respond to basic needs that are common to all traditions when a performance has to be created and staged. A comparative overview of auxiliary techniques shows that the material culture of the actor, with its diverse processes, forms and styles, stems from the way in which actors respond to those same practical needs. The authors’ research for this aspect of theatre anthropology was based on examination of practices, texts and of 1400 images, chosen as exemplars.

Art, Culture, and Pedagogy

Revisiting the Work of F. Graeme Chalmers

Edited by Dustin Garnet and Anita Sinner

The legacy of Graeme Chalmers’s research in art education underpins a foundational understanding of critical multiculturalism and offers a rigorous analysis of oppression and institutionalization of unequal power relations. His work begins in stories involving disruption and advocacy, and how when working in collaboration, we may then begin to share lived knowledge in ways that bring sociopolitical dimensions to the fore to help us move towards breaking cycles of divisiveness. International scholars share both reflective commentaries that look back upon Graeme Chalmers’s contributions, as well as offer diverse perspectives that look forward to the enduring potentialities and possibilities of his work today and into the future. These perspectives are presented alongside thirty years of his scholarship creating new insights and provocations that will continue to influence our collective work for social justice. Art, Culture, and Pedagogy: Revisiting the Work of F. Graeme Chalmers holds timeless wisdom, articulating Graeme’s deep respect for cultural pluralism, his passionate embrace of inclusivity and diversity, and his dedication to social justice issues – all issues of compelling urgency today. His distinguished international leadership and his pioneering ideas continue to be adopted, engaged, and applied at all levels of art education.

No BS (Bad Stats)

Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing They Hear about Black People

Series:

Ivory A. Toldson

A Brill | Sense Bestseller!

What if everything you thought you knew about Black people generally, and educating Black children specifically, was based on BS (bad stats)? We often hear things like, “Black boys are a dying breed,” “There are more Black men in prison than college,” “Black children fail because single mothers raise them,” and “Black students don’t read.” In No BS, Ivory A. Toldson uses data analysis, anecdotes, and powerful commentary to dispel common myths and challenge conventional beliefs about educating Black children. With provocative, engaging, and at times humorous prose, Toldson teaches educators, parents, advocates, and students how to avoid BS, raise expectations, and create an educational agenda for Black children that is based on good data, thoughtful analysis, and compassion. No BS helps people understand why Black people need people who believe in Black people enough not to believe every bad thing they hear about Black people.