Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 501 items for :

  • Biblical Interpretations x
  • Biblical Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All
Author: Jean Maurais
Much can be learned about a translation’s linguistic and cultural context by studying it as a text, a literary artifact of the culture that produced it. However, its nature as a translation warrants a careful approach, one that pays attention to the process by which its various features came about. In Characterizing Old Greek Deuteronomy as an Ancient Translation, Jean Maurais develops a framework derived from Descriptive Translation Studies to bring both these aspects in conversation. He then outlines how the Deuteronomy translator went about his task and provides a characterization of the work as a literary product.
with Annotated Transcription of Geniza Fragments
Author: Paul R. Moore
Targum Canticles, composed in the dialectally eclectic idiom of Late Jewish Literary Aramaic (LJLA), had immense historic popularity among Jewish communities worldwide. In this work, Paul R. Moore thoroughly analyses several of the Targum’s grammatical peculiarities overlooked by previous studies. Through this prism, he considers its literary influences, composition, and LJLA as a precursor of the highly eccentric Aramaic of the 13th century Spanish cabalistic masterpiece, The Zohar. The study includes transcriptions and analysis of the previously unpublished of fragments of the Targum from the Cairo Geniza, and what is possibly its earliest, known translation into Judaeo-Arabic.
Karl Barth and the Tasks of Eschatology
Volume Editors: Kaitlyn Dugan and Philip G. Ziegler
In this volume, leading systematic theologians and New Testament scholars working today undertake a fresh and constructive interdisciplinary engagement with key eschatological themes in Christian theology in close conversation with the work of Karl Barth. Ranging from close exegetical studies of Barth’s treatment of eschatological themes in his commentary on Romans or lectures on 1 Corinthians, to examination of his mature dogmatic discussions of death and evil, this volume offers a fascinating variety of insights into both Barth’s theology and its legacy, as well as the eschatological dimensions of the biblical witness and its salience for both the academy and church.

Contributors are: John M. G. Barclay, Douglas Campbell, Christophe Chalamet, Kaitlyn Dugan, Nancy J. Duff, Susan Eastman, Beverly Roberts Gaventa, Grant Macaskill, Kenneth Oakes, Christoph Schwöbel Christiane Tietz, Philip G. Ziegler.
Author: P. van der Lugt
In this volume, Pieter van der Lugt offers a comprehensive analysis of the rhetorical structure of Isaiah. As in his previous studies on the Book of Job and the Psalter the author demonstrates that classical Hebrew poetry displays a well-defined structure consisting of balanced main parts (cantos) and subdivision into strophes. This rhetorical starting point is of crucial importance for the delimitation of the individual poems in Isaiah 40-48 and in many cases determines their interpretation. Subsequently, it is demonstrated that the successive compositions form well-defined and coherent cycles of poems.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
In his ‘Project of the New Testament’ Erasmus also wrote a running commentary on all New Testament books, except Revelation, in the form of a paraphrase. In this volume, the Paraphrase on John – Latin text with critical apparatus, and English introduction and commentary, is edited. In the paraphrase, Erasmus turns out to be a mature interpreter of the Bible, who advocated a new Christianity, which he called ‘the philosophy of Christ’, and implicitly criticized the clergy of his own age.
Studies on Society and Politics in the Bible and Ancient Near East in Honor of Daniel E. Fleming
A “Community of Peoples”: Studies on Society and Politics in the Bible and Ancient Near East in Honor of Daniel E. Fleming draws together a diverse community of scholars to honor the career of Daniel E. Fleming as a historian of the Bible and ancient Near East.

Together, these scholars participate in a dynamic historical enterprise, each one positioning themself along a Middle Eastern spatial-temporal continuum stretching from the Old Babylonian to the Persian periods. Each contributor attempts to touch a sliver of ancient history, whether a particular person or community, a text or visual image or scribal process. They do so through a diversity of methods and disciplines, which together reflect the possibilities and promises for history writing.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.
The Bible and the Academy in the Public Square. Essays for the Occasion of Professor John Barton’s 70th Birthday
Volume Editors: Hywel Clifford and Megan Daffern
Exegesis has ethical dimensions. This is the case for the Bible, which has a foundational status in traditional perspectives that is simultaneously contested in the modern world. This innovative essay collection, largely about Hebrew Bible/Old Testament texts, is written by an international team – all Doktorkinder of a pioneer in this area, Professor John Barton, whose 70th birthday this volume celebrates. With interdisciplinary angles, the essays highlight the roles and responsibilities of the biblical scholar, often located professionally between religious and secular domains. This reflects a broader reality: all readers of texts are engaged ethically in the public square of ideas.