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Russian Literature for Children and Teens, 1991–2017
Growing Out of Communism explores the rise of a new body of literature for children and teens following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent transformation of the publishing industry.
Lanoux, Herold, and Bukhina first consider the Soviet foundations of the new literature, then chart the huge influx of translated literature into Russia in the 1990s. In tracing the development of new literature that reflects the lived experiences of contemporary children and teens, the book examines changes to literary institutions, dominant genres, and archetypal heroes. Also discussed are the informal networks and online reader responses that reflect the views of child and teen readers.
The BRILL series Studies in Slavic Literature and Poetics occupies a unique place in the academic and intellectual book market due to its emphasis on theoretically informed and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of Slavic literatures and cultures.
The series welcomes book proposals for monographs or edited volumes discussing questions of Slavic culture, identity and history as expressed in literature, film and other forms of cultural production.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Chinese immigrants who settle in Russia’s Far East without formal instruction in the Russian language communicate with local Russians using Russian vocabulary. Each immigrant forms their language to communicate with Russians, not with family or other immigrants. The ‘single-generation languages’ that immigrants form are not replications or simplifications of Chinese or Russian. Grammatical systems formed by these speakers challenge some fundamental assumptions in early 21st-century linguistic theories. Grammatical systems of single-generation languages provide a unique window into how complex grammatical systems emerge, what are the first formal means of expression, and what are the first meanings expressed in grammatical systems. Given massive migrations in the contemporary world, single-generation languages are common, yet understudied, products of language contact.
In: Language Formation by Adults
In: Language Formation by Adults
In: Language Formation by Adults
In: Language Formation by Adults
In: Language Formation by Adults
In: Language Formation by Adults
In: Language Formation by Adults