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Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online, Collection 2023 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Classical Studies in 2023.

Coverage:
Ancient Philosophy, Ancient History, Ancient Religion, Greek and Roman Literature, Epigraphy & Papyrology, Archeology

This collection includes La splendeur des dieux: Quatre études iconographiques sur l’hellénisme égyptien, a 2 volume set.

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

For other pricing options, consortium arrangements and free 30-day trials contact us at sales-us@brill.com (the Americas) or sales-nl@brill.com (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia-Pacific).
This collection includes 6 volumes of the series Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava (1941-2023). It contains publications of papyrological, mainly documentary texts, as well as articles and monographs, on the themes of law and society in Ancient Egypt, in particular in the Graeco-Roman period. The focus of the series lies on the Greek and Demotic sources, however attention is also given to documents in Hieratic, Coptic and Latin. The series is a publication of the Foundation for the Papyrological Institute of the University of Leiden. The aim of the Foundation is the promotion of the study of Greek and Demotic papyrology in Leiden. All publications in this series are peer reviewed.
SEG LXVII covers newly published Greek inscriptions and studies on previously known documents from the year 2017, with occasional additions from previous years that have been missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2016 but pertaining to material from 2017.
Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

Abstract

This paper presents a new edition of Speusippus’ fr. 57 Tarán (= 100 Isnardi Parente), transmitted by Philodemus’ On Piety. The improved text sheds new light on the early Academy’s debate on cosmology and theology and on the already known doxographical accounts (especially Aëtius’) on Speusippus’ view of who the Deity is.

In: Mnemosyne
In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

This paper traces the enjambment techniques employed by Hellenistic and Latin authors at the end of the elegiac couplet. While the Alexandrians make deliberate use of enjambment at the end of the pentameter, in later Hellenistic and in Latin epigram there is a discernible movement toward a unity of syntax and metre, as testified by the poets’ tendency to avoid enjambment between distichs. The earliest Latin epigrammatists loyally render their Greek contemporaries’ aesthetics. Catullus, in his turn to Callimachean poetics, at times employs enjambment in this position, especially in elegy (as opposed to epigram). These techniques are largely abandoned by the Augustan poets, who rigidly introduce epigrammatic avoidance of enjambment into longer elegiac poems; among them, only Propertius in his fourth book rarely uses it as a stylistic means.

In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

The Hermotimus is undoubtedly the most ambitious of Lucian’s philosophical dialogues, since the author undertakes a systematic study of the best philosopher in this work. More specifically, the protagonists of this dialogue, the Stoic aspirant Hermotimos and his antidogmatic interlocutor Lykinos, seek a definite answer to the following questions: Does the true and authentic philosopher exist? If so, then where is it possible to find him, and how can he prove the excellence of his philosophical tenets? A utopian moment can be captured in nuce in these questions, for the object at the heart of the discussion assumes all the features of a desideratum which is difficult, if not impossible, to fulfil, implying an operation that is constantly exposed to the risk of being reduced to nothing.

In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

In Menander’s Epitrepontes, Charisios acknowledges his own faults and mistreatment of his wife Pamphile in an act 4 speech. During his confession, he repeats the verb δείκνυµι three times within six lines. In this article, I argue that such a verb has a double meaning. Charisios’ explicit use of the verb conveys a ‘revelation of character’ as Charisios and the daimonion he invokes ‘reveals’ that he has erred in his actions. On a metatheatrical level between the audience and playwright, the verb also conveys the literal meaning of ‘showing’, as it nods to the playwright putting Charisios onstage (and thus ‘showing’ him) for the first time in this scene. This double meaning of δείκνυµι adds to the other metatheatrical moments in the play illuminated by other scholars and reveals in Menander a close attention to the power of absence and presence in his plays.

In: Mnemosyne
Author:

Abstract

This article aims to revise previous findings concerning selected passages of Seneca’s Phoenician Women (374-375; 610-613; 184-187; 314-315; 437-439; 631-632). In each of them, the unanimous reading of the MSS was replaced by conjectures which are now almost universally accepted by reputable editors and commentators. To justify these emendations, it was argued that the MS phrase did not make sense or was grammatically or stylistically incorrect; sometimes, the text was modified on the assumption that the author had imitated another poet when working on a particular line. In this paper, the passages are analysed in the light of Seneca’s other statements and against the broader background of ancient literary tradition. The results show that the conjectures are based on unconfirmed assumptions or flawed premises and thus should be rejected in favour of the MS reading.

In: Mnemosyne