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Abstract

While Michael Polanyi’s epistemology is fruitful for considering beauty’s epistemological significance, this article shows that Polanyi’s epistemology lacks explicit development of an important aspect of beauty’s contribution to knowledge formation—as mediator. The treatment unfolds by first assessing how Polanyi does treat beauty, and second by establishing the grounds for beauty to serve as a mediator, as well as its fittingness within a Polanyian epistemology. The article considers an expansion of Polanyi’s epistemology to further and more clearly elucidate beauty as mediator of knowledge. Concluding remarks consider how beauty as mediator of knowledge opens the door to pursuit of questions regarding beauty’s role in theological epistemology—i.e., in mediating knowledge of God specifically.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
Author:

Abstract

Believers are told in Ephesians 6:11 to put on God’s armour. In Isaiah 59:17, God himself puts on the breastplate of righteousness and the helmet of salvation to come and fight for his people, and these are among the qualities identified as missing in the indictment against God’s people in Isaiah 59:8–15. The article identifies other intertextual allusions to Isaiah in the other four items of armour, and explores the extent to which the other qualities represented by the pieces of equipment also draw on the description of the nation’s plight in Isaiah 59. An awareness of these intertextual allusions suggests that putting on God’s armour means enlisting in the spiritual struggle and going on the offensive by adopting a lifestyle marked by the qualities listed in Ephesians 6:14–17.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
Author:

Abstract

Most English translations of the story of the Star of Bethlehem either say explicitly or seem to imply that Herod learns from the magi the point in time at which the star appeared. This translation reflects an unusual understanding of two words in the Greek text, as well as raising the question why he killed children aged over a range of two years if he knew the exact age of the baby. These problems have been raised in the critical literature, yet many modern versions continue to offer a grammatically and logically strange interpretation. This article will argue that this interpretation is based on the assumption of a Hellenistic genethliac astrological background for the text, and that the perceived need for this common translation disappears if a Babylonian astrological background is assumed.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology

Abstract

It is widely granted that in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Princeton Theological Seminary had come to be recognized as an international bastion of evangelical and Reformed orthodoxy. Students, drawn to Princeton from across the USA and many points across the globe, returned home to teach and preach the Christian faith as Princeton had relayed it to them. Since the denominationally-mandated reorganization of this seminary in 1929, conservative evangelicals have circulated a narrative describing the seminary as undergoing a ‘death’ in that year. This essay seeks to show both that the theological reorientation of this seminary was much more gradual than this now-customary narrative would allow, and that the graduates of this seminary from both before and after 1929 went on exercising a wide national and international evangelical leadership for decades beyond the reorganization.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
Classical Perspectives on Ascent in the Journey to God
Volume Editors: and
How does one grow holy in such times? This question drove the early Christian imagination no less than it does today. Patristic Spirituality: Classical Perspectives on Ascent to the Divine features numerous studies offering an “itinerary” for early Christian believers wishing to enter into the divine presence. Readers will discover an array of perennial early Christian wisdom into the practical challenges of ascent, “a work of God in Christ, transforming and incorporating us,” says Lewis Ayres. See how early Christians cultivated the life of grace with hospitality, silence, almsgiving, and other ascetic practices for human elevation into mystical union with God.

Contributors are: Benjamin D. Wayman, John S. Bergsma and Luke Iyengar, Hans Boersma, Stanley E. Porter, Gregory Vall Don W. Springer, Bogdan G. Bucur, Amy Brown Hughes, Sean Argondizza-Moberg, Stephen M. Hildebrand, Brian Matz, Anna Silvas, Ann Conway-Jones, Sandy L. Haney, Despina D. Prassas, Gerald Boersma, Brian E. Daley, Andrew Louth, Jonathan L. Zecher, Kevin M. Clarke, Lewis Ayres.
Series Editors: and
The New History of the Sermon series publishes current scholarship on the theory and practice of preaching. The first six volumes are edited collections focusing on the Christian sermon from the patristic era through the nineteenth century. Starting with Volume 7, the scope has expanded in three ways. First, the inclusion of faith traditions such as Judaism and Islam as well as New Religious Movements (NRMs). Second, the inclusion of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Third, the addition of other forms of scholarship such as monographs and critical editions of primary texts.

The Series Editors, Keith Francis (email) and Robert Ellison (email), welcome proposals from clergy, researchers in homiletics and related disciplines, as well as established and emerging scholars in communication studies, rhetoric, theology, history, sociology, and related fields.