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Volume Editors: and
There are few, if any, other educational philosophers that have left their mark internationally as John Dewey has. Author of 40 books and no less than 700 articles that appeared in over 140 journals, Dewey’s work has been translated into at least 35 languages. His landmark Democracy and Education – published over a century ago in 1916 – is one of the most cited educational texts ever.

Dewey has inspired educators and provoked controversies in his day, and still does so today. This volume sets out to engage with Dewey’s educational thought, especially as it relates to its circulation in the countries bordering on the Mediterranean. Authors consider his enduring influence, and reflect on the ‘push’ and ‘pull’ forces that served to anchor progressivism, in its multiple manifestations, in the region. The notion of a unidirectional force – personified by Dewey – that is somehow absorbed by the ‘receiving’ country is problematised by most if not all chapters in this volume. Rather, contributors carefully show how context affects a process marked by active appropriation, re-interpretation, adaptation, as well as resistance.

Sometimes a vibrant presence that still needs to be reckoned with, at other times a ghostly figure nevertheless serving to sustain democratic aspirations in and through education, Dewey and his message resonate, challenge, and demand a response.
In Ecocritical Perspectives in Teacher Education, the editors share a collection of chapters from diverse critical scholars in teacher education.

Teachers, and their students, are faced with demands that require teacher educators to work toward better preparing them to teach in a changed world—a world where diversity, human rights, sustainability, and democracy must be paramount. This text calls together teacher educators who address the complex ways that social and environmental injustices—like racism, sexism, classism, ableism, and speciesism—weave together to produce dangerous conditions for all life. The volume shares with readers a glimpse into alternatives possible for teaching that are situational, local, and in support of social justice and sustainability.

Contributors are: Marissa E. Bellino, Melissa Bradford, Greer Burroughs, Nataly Chesky, Brandon Edwards-Schuth, Alison Happel-Parkins, Kevin Holohan, Agnes C. Krynski, John Lupinacci, Emilia Maertens, Rebecca Martusewicz, Emma McMain, Michio Okamura, Clayton Pierce, Meneka Repka, Graham B. Slater, Silvia Patricia Solís, JT Torres, Rita Turner, Robert G. Unzueta and Mark Wolfmeyer.
Series Editors: , , and
Members of the ISATT represent a diverse group of teacher educator researchers and scholars from across the world who have interests in advancing understandings and practices related to teaching and teacher education. This ISATT Members Book series serves as a medium through which innovative research on teacher education theory and practice is mobilised and made accessible to scholars and practitioners. This book series features cutting edge scholarship that addresses ongoing and emerging challenges in teaching and teacher education.
An Introduction to a Phenomenological Approach to the Philosophical Study of Education
Author:
Is there room for philosophy in educational research? Where is phenomenology before and beyond its uses and abuses in the applied and social sciences? How are phenomenology and philosophy of education related? What are the methods of phenomenology within the field of philosophy of education? These talks to educational scholars and researchers respond to these questions and make an appeal for the place of philosophy within educational research and the tradition of phenomenology within philosophy of education. Across a broad genealogy of thought, with frequent substitutions and autobiographical confessions, these lectures work from and towards a simple article of faith: philosophy and education are not so different.
Series Editors: and
Moral Development and Citizenship Education is a book series that focuses on the cultural development of our young people and the pedagogical ideas and educational arrangements to support this development. It includes the social, political and religious domains, as well as cognitive, emotional and action oriented content. The concept of citizenship has extended from being a pure political judgment, to include the social and interpersonal dynamics of people.
Morality has become a multifaceted and highly diversified construct that now includes cultural, developmental, situational and professional aspects. Its theoretical modelling, practical applications and measurements have become central scientific tasks. Citizenship and moral development are connected with the identity constitution of the next generations. A caring and supporting learning environment can help them to participate in society.
Books in this series will be based on different scientific and ideological theories, research methodologies and practical perspectives. The series has an international scope; it will support manuscripts from different parts of the world and it includes authors and practices from various countries and cultures, as well as comparative studies. The series seeks to stimulate a dialogue between different points of view, research traditions and cultures. It contains multi-authored handbooks, focusing on specific issues, and monographs. We invite books that challenge the academic community, bring new perspectives into the community and broaden the horizon of the domain of moral development and citizenship education.

Abstract

In this research the authors explore ClasSimVR, a proof-of-concept immersive virtual reality (ivr) application. This software is designed to support pre-service teachers (psts) implementation of a School-Wide Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (swpbis) approach to challenging student behaviours. ClasSimVR offers users the opportunity to engage with immersive hypothetical scenarios, whereby virtual students display challenging behaviours. Users respond to these behaviours with a range of possible actions aligned with a swpbis approach. The authors draw on a research-through-design (rtd) methodology to explore the design process of ClasSimVR. The article investigates the implications of an expert evaluation (n=5) conducted as part of the design process of creating ClasSimVR. More broadly, this research contributes to the discourse surrounding the design and implementation of immersive learning environments in educational contexts.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Rethinking Theory and Practice
Series Editor:
This series maps the emergent field of educational futures. It will commission books on the futures of education in relation to the question of globalisation and knowledge economy. It seeks authors who can demonstrate their understanding of discourses of the knowledge and learning economies. It aspires to build a consistent approach to educational futures in terms of traditional methods, including scenario planning and foresight, as well as imaginative narratives, and it will examine examples of futures research in education, pedagogical experiments, new utopian thinking, and educational policy futures with a strong accent on actual policies and examples.
Series Editors: , , and
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
Author:

Abstract

Visual methods have been emphasised as alternative and complementary to traditional data collection methods in research with children and as useful tools in presenting conceptual and analytical frameworks. In their capacity to evoke the non-rational and material aspects of life, visual methods are also particularly beneficial in exploring everyday, taken for granted, institutional food practices. This article describes the way in which two sets of visual methods, namely representations and researcher-created data, were utilised within a study on a changing food practice in a Norwegian kindergarten. The representation is of a conceptual model, featuring Hedegaard’s cultural-historical wholeness approach and Fullan’s change model, which is visually presented. With this visualized conceptualisation, the study realises the goal of understanding the societal, institutional and individual perspectives in the change process. The researcher-created data included visual materials and video observations, exemplifying the change outcomes in relation to children’s experiences and participation in the “new” meal situation as well as their liking of, acceptance and consumption of the new food. This article concludes that the visual methods adopted are helpful both in conceptualisation and in data collection and generate important insights about the change of food practices.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In this article, the authors intra-act with conceptual toolkit to examine noncomplaint learning of a ropemaking activity at The Norwegian Fisheries Museum in Bergen. Barad’s concepts of intra-action and diffraction allow us to perceive the rope as noncompliantly diffracting into the two different SpaceTimes of the 19th and 21st centuries. The former SpaceTime is intra-actively constituted by historical ropemaking craftship and the museum staff, and the latter by the children’s approaching the ropemaking through toys and play. In the overlap of the entanglements of the two SpaceTimes, noncompliant and ‘new areas of curiosity’ (, p. 123) unfold and continue the rope’s diffraction into the city. By following the intra-active community of Ida and the rope, the authors map entanglements of more-than-human worldings and conclude with a call for more museal diffractions that can (intra-)activate the museum’s relational capacities in the ecology of the city.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy