Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 89 items for :

  • Minority & Group Rights x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Anna Muś
In The Political Potential of Upper Silesian Ethnoregionalist Movement: A Study in Ethnic Identity and Political Behaviours of Upper Silesians Anna Muś offers a study on the phenomenon of ethnoregionalism in one of the regions in Poland. Since 1945, ethnopolitics in Poland have been based on the so-called assumption of the ethnic homogeneity of the Polish nation. Even the transformation of the political system to a fully democratic one in 1989 did not truly change it. However, over the last three decades, we can observe growing discontent in Upper Silesia and the politicisation of Silesian ethnicity. This is happening in a region with its own history of autonomy and culturally diversified society, where an ethnoregionalist political movement appeared already in 1989.
In this book James Nafziger covers emerging topics of cultural heritage law, particularly at the international level, by focusing primarily on the numerous work products of the International Law Association's Committee on Cultural Heritage Law. Cultural heritage law has become a landmark in the field of international law. Its construction is a good example of transnationalism at work, combining legislation, judicial decisions, and other national initiatives, diplomacy, intergovernmental agreements, especially within the framework of UNESCO, and non-governmental activities and instruments. This volume focuses on the seminal contributions to this process of the Committee on Cultural Heritage Law of the International Law Association, while situating these projects against the broader background of the development of the modern international regime for protecting cultural heritage.
This book focuses on trend-setting judgments in different parts of the world that impacted on the rights of persons belonging to minorities and Indigenous people. The cases illustrate how the judiciary has been called upon to fill out the detail of minority protection arrangements and how, in doing so, in many instances the judiciary has taken the respective countries on a course that parliament may not have been able to navigate. In this book authors from various backgrounds in the practical application of minority protection arrangements investigate the role of the judiciary in constitutional arrangements aimed at the protection of the rights of minorities and Indigenous peoples.
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers Spain and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Spanish language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.

Abstract

This study examines how symbolic, psychological and material factors influence how Americans view migrants before and after the heated 2016 primary season leading to the nomination of Donald Trump as the Republican Party’s presidential candidate. We hypothesize that prior unfavorable predispositions towards migrants, preference for high skilled migrants, personality traits, and material variables strongly influence views on migrants. We examine the effect of these variables with two controlled experiments set a year apart, before and after the 2016 primary election. The experiments manipulate the ethnicity (Asian, Hispanic, Arab) and skill level (high skilled or low skilled) of migrant groups. In both experiments, we find that respondents have an overall positive view of migrants regardless of ethnicity. However, those respondents who hold anti-immigrant stereotypes, have authoritarian personalities, and whose economic standing is worsening see immigrants as threatening. We also find that negative emotion plays a mediating role in this process.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

Abstract

This article studies the process of minoritising members of majority groups through the use of narrow identity markers in heterogeneous countries like Bangladesh. Through historical analysis of the State’s influence on people's sense of cultural identity, it argues that when a group does not identify with State-imposed identity markers, they are alienated by the State and reduced to pseudo-minorities. Pseudo-minorities are groups of individuals who do not satisfy objective elements of minority identity, yet are discriminated against by the State in a minority-like manner. These individuals identify themselves as a group, and while they have formal equality, they lack de facto equality. These pseudo-minorities have no precise legal mechanism to redress such discrimination either under domestic or international law. The emerging right to cultural identity can become a tool to protect these groups.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Author: Kamrul Hossain

Abstract

The Japanese government legally recognized the Ainu as an Indigenous People in 2019. While the legislation is a step forward, it does not provide the Ainu with concrete rights applicable to Indigenous Peoples as those rights are set out in international legal standards, articulated in several human rights instruments and authoritative statements issued by both United Nations organs and the international treaty monitoring bodies. The most common issue concerning Indigenous Peoples’ rights is the practice of traditional livelihoods linked to their lands and resources. Particularly for coastal communities, traditional fishing has been recognized as an important livelihood for sustaining the people’s culture and their ethnic and cultural identity. This article explores the traditional fishing right of the Ainu, which has recently become a point of conflict given that existing local regulations jeopardize the right. The article critically examines the compatibility of the provisions of the conflicting local and national regulations.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

Abstract

The study investigates the satisfaction of religious minorities in Pakistan subject to government policies and attitudes of the Muslim majority. A cross-sectional study design was used to collect data from 120 respondents living in rural areas in Pakistan. Descriptive statistics and the Pearson correlation coefficient were used to measure the relatedness of essential factors of freedom of expression, opportunity in government services, security of unprotected assembly, prejudice in relationship with Muslims and welcomeness in Muslim neighbourhoods. Yeh’s Index of Satisfaction was used to measure the satisfaction level of religious minorities with government policies and attitudes of the Muslim majority. The study findings revealed that religious minorities are least satisfied with their citizenship rights in Pakistan, which poses various questions to government policies and legislation. Further, they were also least satisfied with the attitudes of the Muslim majority with whom they must interact in their everyday life.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

Abstract

This article examines the trajectories of adat law in Indonesia by looking at the extent to which legal pluralism has been constitutionalized. This article argues that the formation of the 1945 Constitution, which was driven by the political motivation of legal unification, did not produce inclusive constitutional provisions recognizing the jurisdiction of adat law and enabled practice of legal centralism during authoritarian regimes of Soekarno (1959–1966) and Soeharto (1967–1998). Although post-New Order democratization and decentralization offered political opportunities for indigenous peoples’ movements to promote legal pluralism and reconcile their marginalized traditional rights, Indonesia has made little progress as the conditional recognition approach adopted through constitutional amendments poses significant obstacles for legitimizing adat law norms as part of the plurilegal order. This article offers historical interpretation to the status, position and legal consequences of adat law in Indonesian legal system from its independence until the beginning of reformasi era.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Volume Editors: Terressa A. Benz and Graham Cassano
This volume places the Flint, Michigan, water contamination disaster in the context of a broader crisis of neoliberal governance in the United States. Authors from a range of disciplines (including sociology, criminal justice, anthropology, history, communications, and jurisprudence) examine the failures in Flint, but with an emphasis upon comparison, calling attention to similar trajectories for cities like Detroit and Pontiac, in Michigan, and Stockton, in California. While the studies collected here emphasize policy failures, class conflict, and racial oppression, they also attend to the resistance undertaken by Flint residents, Michiganders, and U.S. activists, as they fought for environmental and social justice.

Contributors include: Terressa A. Benz, Jon Carroll, Graham Cassano, Daniel J. Clark, Katrinell M. Davis, Michael Doan, David Fasenfest, A.E. Garrison, Peter J. Hammer, Ami Harbin, Shea Howell, Jacob Lederman, Raoul S. Lievanos, Benjamin J. Pauli, and Julie Sze.