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Author: Jane Gilmer
The Alchemical Actor offers an imagination for new and future theatre inspired by the manifesto of Antonin Artaud. The alchemical four elements – earth, water, air and fire and the four alchemical stages – nigredo, albedo, citrino and rubedo serve as initiatory steps towards the performance of transmutational consciousness. The depth psychological work of Carl G. Jung, the theatre techniques of Michael Chekhov and Rudolf Steiner infuse ‘this’ Great Work. Jane Gilmer leads the reader through alchemical imaginations beyond material cognition towards gold-making heart-thinking - key to new and future theatre.
In: The Alchemical Actor
In: The Alchemical Actor
In: The Alchemical Actor
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In: The Alchemical Actor

Abstract

This essay makes a case for teaching an interdisciplinary undergraduate course at the intersection of religion, ecology, and business. At a basic level, this approach gets students with diverse intellectual orientations and career interests in the same room; letting business and environmental studies majors work together on these questions fosters a variation on interfaith engagement. More deeply, it creates space for them to develop critical self-awareness about their own ethical commitments. The fact that no single instructor can be an expert in all three fields should not prevent us from stepping boldly into uncharted territory. The degradation of the earth is an interdisciplinary problem that requires interdisciplinary solutions, and each of us has something to contribute right now even if we cannot do it all. As teachers and lifelong learners, we can and must model intellectual humility even as we look for ways to take decisive individual and collective action.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

Abstract

An undergraduate course in religion is an ideal place to discuss climate change, and a key task in these classrooms should be teaching students to thoughtfully and critically engage narratives used to make sense of and respond to the issue. Debates about anthropogenic climate change depend upon broad stories about the nature of reality and the place of humans within it; scholars of religion can teach skills of rigorous analysis, thoughtful tolerance, contextual understanding, and critical thinking that will help students grapple with these narratives. Students who are trained to think this way gain skills to respond to the competing facts and despair that can all-too-often make talking and teaching about climate change difficult.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology