Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • Social History x
  • Asian Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In 1870, a prominent samurai from Tōhoku sells his castle to become an agrarian colonist in Hokkaidō. Decades later, a man also from northeast Japan stows away on a boat to Canada and establishes a salmon roe business. By 1930, an investigative journalist travels to Brazil and writes a book that wins the first-ever Akutagawa Prize. In the 1940s, residents from the same area proclaim that they should lead Imperial Japan in colonizing all of Asia.

Across decades and oceans, these fractured narratives seem disparate, but show how mobility is central to the history of Japan’s Tōhoku region, a place often stereotyped as a site of rural stasis and traditional immobility, thereby collapsing boundaries between local, national, and global studies of Japan.

This book examines how multiple mobilities converge in Japan’s supposed hinterland. Drawing on research from three continents, this monograph demonstrates that Tohoku’s regional identity is inextricably intertwined with Pacific migrations.
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In: Tōhoku Unbounded: Regional Identity and the Mobile Subject in Prewar Japan
In the past decades, the world has watched the rise of China as an economic and military power and the emergence of Chinese transnational elites. What may seem like an entirely new phenomenon marks the revival of a trend initiated at the end of the Qing. The redistribution of power, wealth and knowledge among the newly formed elites matured during the Republican period.
This volume demonstrates both the difficulty and the value of re-thinking the elites in modern China. It establishes that the study of the dynamic tensions within the elite and among elite groups in this epochal era is within reach if we are prepared to embrace forms of historical inquiry that integrate the abundant and even limitless historical resources, and to engage with the rich repertoire of digital techniques/instruments available and question our previous research paradigms.
This renewed approach brings historical research closer to an integrative data-rich history of modern China.
In: Knowledge, Power, and Networks