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Karl Barth and the Tasks of Eschatology
Volume Editors: Kaitlyn Dugan and Philip G. Ziegler
In this volume, leading systematic theologians and New Testament scholars working today undertake a fresh and constructive interdisciplinary engagement with key eschatological themes in Christian theology in close conversation with the work of Karl Barth. Ranging from close exegetical studies of Barth’s treatment of eschatological themes in his commentary on Romans or lectures on 1 Corinthians, to examination of his mature dogmatic discussions of death and evil, this volume offers a fascinating variety of insights into both Barth’s theology and its legacy, as well as the eschatological dimensions of the biblical witness and its salience for both the academy and church.

Contributors are: John M. G. Barclay, Douglas Campbell, Christophe Chalamet, Kaitlyn Dugan, Nancy J. Duff, Susan Eastman, Beverly Roberts Gaventa, Grant Macaskill, Kenneth Oakes, Christoph Schwöbel Christiane Tietz, Philip G. Ziegler.
Pentecostal forms of Christianity have now taken a dynamic role in contemporary Christianity, often at the vanguard of new movements and spiritual vitality among Christians in the late modern world. The many movements which constitute global Pentecostalism share in common an intense commitment to the Bible and life in the Spirit. Over the past several decades, Pentecostal biblical scholarship has played an important role in resourcing Pentecostal theologies. These elements come together in this volume in which leading Pentecostal biblical scholars from around the world account for the appearance of the divine Spirit, putting forth a defining work from a seminal generation of scholars. Contributors are: J. Ayodeji Adewuya, Kenneth J. Archer, Melissa Archer, Emma M. Austin, Holly Beers, Michael L. Brown, Blaine Charette, Jacob Cherian, Roger D. Cotton, Daniel K. Darko, Finny Philip, Roji Thomas George, Jacqueline Grey, Alicia R. Jackson, Wonsuk Ma, Lee Roy Martin, Robert P. Menzies, Brian Neil Peterson, Rebecca Skaggs, Joe Thomas, John Christopher Thomas, Robby Waddell, Rick Wadholm, Nimi Wariboko, Cynthia Long Westfall.
Author: Ivana Noble
In this volume of Essays in Ecumenical Theology Ivana Noble engages in conversations with Orthodox theologians and spiritual writers on diverse themes. These include the discovery of the human heart, what illumination by divine light means, the relationship between prayer and attitudes and acts of social solidarity, the problematic nature of sacrificial thinking as the way to express redemption through Christ, the ecological dimension of theological anthropology, the need for freedom to coexist with love for others and why institutions need to turn not only to their own traditions but also to the Spirit that blows where it wills.
Author: Steve Mason
Josephus wrote his most impactful history, The Judean War, in seven volumes. The volume translated here and furnished with a full historical commentary, is pivotal. Filled with high drama and penetrating assessments of human behavior under extreme duress, it brings readers from Galilee and mass suicide at Gamala in the Golan to Vespasian’s rise to imperial power. In between, Josephus explains how first John of Gischala and then Simon bar Giora came to be the two dominant figures in Jerusalem, setting up the siege of Titus. This volume also introduces the war’s most famous antagonists: the Zealots (or Disciples).

Abstract

The miscell offers the explanation for a verse that has always been misunderstood: Prud. perist. 10.845.

In: Vigiliae Christianae

Abstract

Several recent studies on Justin’s Dialogue with Trypho the Jew have argued that the Dialogue should not be read as a witness to the state of theological debate between Jews and Christ-followers in the second century. Such arguments conclude that Justin does not engage with actual Jewish perspectives, but rather reconstructs a hypothetical Judaism from second-hand, polemical sources, or merely uses Trypho’s “Judaism” as a stand-in for what are actually (in Justin’s view) heterodox Christian interpretations. This article challenges this claim by returning to an older debate in Justin scholarship: the question of his relationship with Philo of Alexandria. By attending particularly to the role of the Logos in each author’s exegesis of Pentateuchal theophanic texts, the article argues that Justin’s interpretations in the Dialogue carefully avoid a kind of Logos theology that is well represented in the writings of Philo. This rhetorical distancing supports the conclusion that, in the Dialogue, Justin is in fact responding to exegetical traditions which he knows from the writings of Hellenized Judaism.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: Adam Renberg

Mark Randall James, Learning the Language of Scripture. Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation (Studies in Systematic Theology 24), Leiden-Boston: Brill 2021, XIV + 339 pp., ISBN 978-90-04-44653-7, € 59 /US$ 68 (pb).

Mark Randall James, in this stimulating work, dwells on a problem for contemporary students of theology and biblical studies: “the lingering arbitrariness that afflicts modern reading and interpretation of scripture” (p. 2). This arbitrariness is found on several fronts, the most obvious being the divide between theology and biblical studies with their various critical methods. James seeks to develop a

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: Jae Hee Han

Abstract

The Apostle of Jesus Christ, Mani, declares himself to be a “solitary one” (monērēs) no less than three times in the Cologne Mani Codex (CMC). Through a literary analysis that contextualizes the CMC both with contemporary Syrian depictions of anchoritic ascetics, on the one hand, and the hairy mountaineering anchorite (CMC 126.4-129.17) with Mani, on the other hand, this article argues that the redactor of the CMC sought to portray Mani as an anchoritic ascetic. Mani’s declaration to be a monērēs is therefore not incidental, but an essential marker of his identity, even as he sets out into the world as the Apostle of Jesus Christ.

In: Vigiliae Christianae

Abstract

Basil of Caesarea’s On the Holy Spirit has often been painted as a work that symbolises his emergence from the shadow of his embittered mentor, Eustathius of Sebaste. This paper reassesses the extent of Eustathius’ influence on the treatise. By analysing both the tone and argumentation of On the Holy Spirit, I counter this scholarly narrative, showing that Eustathius in fact serves as the silent interlocutor of the treatise, to whom Basil pleads the case of his orthodoxy, and with whom he begs for the church to be healed. Consequently, On the Holy Spirit should be read as more in vogue with apologetic literature than polemic , as a redoubled effort to respond to Eustathius that mounts an impassioned but cordial defence of Basil’s vision of Christian orthodoxy and a long-overdue plea for peace in a war-torn church.

Open Access
In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author: Philip Abbott

Abstract

Ancient philosophers sought to tune the soul and society to the musica universalis, the celestial harmony generated by the rational wheelworks of the cosmos. For Romans, this overarching rationality was associated with the rational speech of elite masculinity. Augustine subverts this discourse, however. Maintaining that the musica universalis is tuned to the love of God rather than rationality, Augustine depicts Roman history as chaotic dissonance that is out of tune with cosmic harmony. He effects a cosmic key change which idealizes behavior that Roman elites would have viewed absurd. Instead of selling a traditional type of speech (rhetoric) that according to Augustine leads to chaos, he teaches Christians to embrace activities in which the uneducated can participate – singing Psalms, and bursting into sudden, incomprehensible eruptions of divine joy, which he terms jubilus. In short, Augustine preaches a radically new sonority to undergird a new society.

In: Vigiliae Christianae