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The Lives and Legacy of Kim Sisŭp (1435–1493) offers an account of the most extraordinary figure of Korean literature and intellectual history. The present work narrates the fascinating story of a prodigious child, acclaimed poet, author of the first Korean novel, Buddhist monk, model subject, Confucian recluse and Daoist master. No other Chosŏn scholar or writer has been venerated in both Confucian shrines and Buddhist temples, had his works widely read in Tokugawa Japan and became an integral part of the North Korean literary canon.
The nine studies and further materials presented in this volume provide a detailed look on the various aspects of Kim Sisŭp’s life and work as well as a reflection of both traditional and modern narratives surrounding his legacy. Contributors are: Vladimír Glomb, Gregory N. Evon, Dennis Wuerthner, Barbara Wall, Kim Daeyeol, Miriam Löwensteinová, Anastasia A. Guryeva, Sixiang Wang, and Diana Yüksel.
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The volume, edited by Tao Feiya and featuring recent Chinese scholarly articles translated into English for the first time by Max L. Bohnenkamp, traces the history of Christianity in China and explores the dynamics of Christian practices in Chinese society. Its twenty chapters, written by Chinese scholars of the history of religion, span the development of Christianity in China from the era of the Tang Dynasty to the twentieth century. The four parts of the volume explore the Sinicization of Christian texts and thought, the conflicts within China between Christianity and Chinese institutions, relations between religious groups, and societal and political issues beyond religion. Taken together, this volume places the practice of Christianity in China into the context of world history, while investigating the particular and localized challenges of Christianity’s spread in China.
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The True Record of the Lord of Heaven (Tianzhu shilu, 1584) by the Jesuit missionary Michele Ruggieri was the first Chinese-language work ever published by a European. Despite being published only a few years after Ruggieri started learning Chinese, it evinced sophisticated strategies to accommodate Christianity to the Chinese context and was a pioneering work in Sino-Western exchange. This book features a critical edition of the Chinese and Latin texts, which are both translated into English for the first time. An introduction, biography, and rich annotations are provided to situate this text in its cultural and intellectual context.
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The 1906 Nanchang Religious Incident sparked a vigorous episode of “press war” between Chinese and Western news outlets. The Chinese and Western camps in this “press war” were split over the question of Nanchang County Magistrate Jiang Zhaotang’s cause of death, which led to three months’ worth of back and forth discursive battling between the two sides. The Chinese side reported that the official was murdered, while the Western side reported that he committed suicide. In this press war both sides went to extremes, but the truth is that Jiang Zhaotang was forced to slit his own throat. The way that the press handles news material is heavily influenced by national sentiment, the promotion of which was one the important missions of the early modern Chinese press. The instance of this press war provides a perfect example of how questions of public opinion, truth, and national sentiment intersected during the late Qing era.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context
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Among the Western figures that most often appeared in the intellectual discourse of the late Qing, Martin Luther holds a special status for being intimately linked to both the Christian missionary enterprise and the modern reform movement in China. In the years between the Opium Wars and the Sino-Japanese War, most Chinese literati saw Luther as a “religious schismatic” and were very critical of him. At the same time, however, some Protestant missionaries began extolling the accomplishments of Luther’s renewal of the church, fashioning his image into that of the “Great Reformer.” In the period of the 1898 “Hundred Days’ Reform” movement, leading reformist intellectuals like Liang Qichao utilized the history of Luther’s transformation of Christianity to find historical legitimacy for the political changes they promoted, exalting Luther’s status even higher, turning him into a type of “mythical” figure in the process. The significance of researching Luther from the perspective of this “mythical” image lies not in evaluating its correspondence to historical reality, but in focusing the investigation on the fashioners of his image and the particular historical currents to which they belonged.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context
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During the nineteenth century, the study of language developed into an independent academic discipline in the West. Through comparison the many languages of humankind were divided into different language families according to morphology and genealogical relationships. Some Sinologists also began searching for the proper location of Chinese within the genealogical tree of human language development. How was Chinese to be studied scientifically? Did Chinese possess genetic relationships with the other languages of humankind? Missionaries and diplomatic officials living in China, and professional scholars teaching at the most prestigious academic institutions in the West each had proposals in response to such questions. The questions that Sinologists encountered in the search for a scientific methodology for the study of Chinese also became subjects of long-lasting debate in broader Western scholarship at the time. Combining information about the historical background of the development of early modern Western linguistics and the analysis of Sinologists’ investigations and debates on the methodology of Chinese language research not only helps deepen our understanding of the historical development of Western Sinology, but more importantly demonstrates the intimate connection between Sinology and early modern thought in the disciplinary history of the Western academy.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context
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The on-going development of charismatic Christianity in early modern China compelled Christians of many denominations to produce writings critical towards this “charismatic movement,” of which Wang Mingdao’s article “The Charismatic Movement in Light of the Bible” is one of the most representative examples. In his criticism of charismatic Christianity, Wang asserted the apocalypticism and authority of the Bible, expressing belief in its truth as a divine sign and a historical record; he upheld a literalist interpretation of scripture, essentially interpreting the Bible according to the literal meaning of the text; he promoted the “centrality of the early church,” taking the charismatic experience of the early Christianity as the reference point and standard for criticism of contemporary charismatic phenomena. In truth, Wang Mingdao’s idea of returning to the early church signaled his dissatisfaction and reproach towards the liberalism of mainstream Christianity at the time, revealing disputes about questions of faith that existed in Chinese Christianity in the Republican Era.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context
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Jingjing was the most important theologian and translator of the Jingjiao religion (Chinese “Nestorianism”) in the Tang Dynasty, while the stele he composed as a comprehensive survey of the theology and history of the Jingjiao Church can be seen as a milestone of his authorial career. His co-translation of the Prajñāpāramitā sūtra on the Six Pāramitās with the monk Prajñā Tripiṭaka can be taken as a watershed event separating the early and later stages of his thought, allowing it to be adduced that the theological formulations of the Sutra on the Origin of Origins and the Sutra of Ultimate and Mysterious Happiness show characteristics of the early stage of his thought, while those of The Book of Praise and the Hymn of Perfection of the Three Majesties possess features of his later stage.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context
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Utilizing the early modern mainstream Protestant publication The Chinese Recorder and Missionary Journal as its main historical source, this chapter examines the understanding and attitude of missionaries in China towards Communism. Its basic conclusion is that the attitude of the missionaries towards Communism was complex and was not simply characterized by condemnation, but also contained elements of acknowledgement, reflection, mutual examination, and emulation, as well as reproach and refutation.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context
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In the late Ming and Early Qing periods, as Catholicism entered China, young women who kept chaste and abstained from marriage came to be known as “virgins” in some regions of the country. These virgins mostly came from homes that had observed Catholicism for multiple generations and therefore shared familial relations. Naturally, because they were located in different regions, the reasons for their chastity varied. For a woman to cultivate purity by keeping chaste and abstaining from marriage was counter to traditional Chinese moral notions, so these virgins were reproached by people outside of the faith at the time. During the one hundred years that Catholicism was prohibited in China, some virgins gradually began to leave home and began to engage in church work.

In: Beyond Indigenization: Christianity and Chinese History in a Global Context