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A Multidisciplinary Perspective
Editor: Anna Slaczka
Re-envisioning Śiva Naṭarāja. A Multidisciplinary Perspective offers new insights into the dancing Śiva as icon and concept. Each of the seven essays in this volume addresses an aspect of the Naṭarāja (a specific form of the dancing Śiva) that has been until now untouched by scholars, or one for which the research is here moved substantially forward. Through the use of hitherto unexplored materials - murals, prints, icons, Sanskrit iconographic and ritual texts, Tamil inscriptions, and the analysis of metal alloys and casting techniques - old views are checked and challenged, and new ideas are proposed. Combining a wide range of fields of expertise, the volume will add to our knowledge about this well-studied, but poorly understood icon. With contributions by Anna A. Ślączka, Anna L. Dallapiccola, Nicolas Cane, Leslie C. Orr, Richard H. Davis, Sharada Srinivasan, Libbie Mills, Corinna Wessels-Mevissen.
Abhinavagupta on Dance and Dramatic Acting
Author: Elisa Ganser
What is Dance? What is Theatre? What is the boundary between enacting a character and narrating a story? When does movement become tinted with meaning? And when does beauty shine alone as if with no object? These universal aesthetic questions find a theoretically vibrant and historically informed set of replies in the oeuvre of the eleventh-century Kashmirian author Abhinavagupta. The present book offers the first critical edition, translation, and study of a crucial and lesser known passage of his commentary on the Nāṭyaśāstra, the seminal work of Sanskrit dramaturgy. The nature of dramatic acting and the mimetic power of dance, emotions, and beauty all play a role in Abhinavagupta’s thorough investigation of performance aesthetics, now presented to the modern reader.

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century, Catalonia witnessed an exponential increase in the use of and predilection for the designs and aesthetic characteristics of Japanese art in the design of stained glass. At the time, oriental forms were received with enthusiasm, which resulted in the development of production of artistic stained glass, inspired by these new models.

This article focuses on the different ways in which Japanese-based designs made their way from Japan to the stained glass workshops of Catalonia, where they were transformed into spectacular pieces, some of which are still preserved today. In addition, the article examines how stained glass makers assimilated the aesthetics and compositional concepts of Japanese art and made them their own, adapting them to their needs while creating innovative stained glass that helped them to, paradoxically, converge with the medieval stained glass on which they were based.

In: Journal of Japonisme
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

George Hendrik Breitner (1857–1923) was a Dutch Realist artist, whose works chronicle urban life in Amsterdam. But his paintings of a young woman, collapsed on a divan and wrapped in a luxuriant kimono, secured his reputation as an exponent of European Japonisme. The so-called ‘Kimono Girls’, completed between 1893 and 1896, are compelling evocations of female leisure, subsumed within an exotic melange of vivid color and pattern. More importantly, they are an amalgamation of several cultural contexts that characterized the volatile nineteenth century. European Japonisme, the revival of Dutch painterly traditions, medical dogma, and the beginnings of organized feminism come together in these works, making them both compelling and subversive.

In: Journal of Japonisme
In: Journal of Japonisme

Abstract

The essay traces the role of Marie Nordlinger (1876-1961) against her ties with Siegfried Bing, Marcel Bing, Marcel Proust and Charles Lang Freer. Nordlinger first worked in the ateliers of art nouveau later becoming a confidante of the Bings who helped sell Japanese prints in the United States especially to Charles Lang Freer when she visited the country.

In: Journal of Japonisme
In: The East Asian Modern Girl
In: The East Asian Modern Girl
In: The East Asian Modern Girl