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Ambiguität, Liminalität und Konversion
Author: Tobias Frese
Frühmittelalterliche Bilder der Christophanie irritieren den Betrachter oftmals durch widersprüchliche Aussagen. Das Buch analysiert prominente Fallbeispiele in neuen Perspektiven.
Doppeldeutigkeiten in der mittelalterlichen Kunst wurden von der kunsthistorischen Forschung lange Zeit unterschätzt oder gänzlich ignoriert. Dies resultierte aus dem traditionellen Anliegen der ikonographischen Interpretationspraxis, christliche Bildinhalte möglichst eindeutig zu bestimmen. Motivische Widersprüchlichkeiten wurden zumeist als Ausnahmen disqualifiziert, auf pragmatische Gründe zurückgeführt oder als künstlerische Fehler abgetan. Im Buch wird anhand mehrerer Fallbeispiele dargelegt, dass diese Sicht der komplexen Bildlogik vieler prominenter Christusbilder des frühen Mittelalters nicht gerecht wird.
Taktiles in Kunst und Theorie
Berührung beschreibt ein Verhältnis zur Welt. Sie durchkreuzt die Aufteilung der Sinne ebenso, wie die Trennung von Subjekt und Objekt. Welche Potenziale und Problemstellungen ergeben sich daraus? Wie steht es um Formen der Berührung und Bedingungen des Taktilen in Kunst und Theorie? Kunst betrachten heißt gemeinhin Distanz bewahren: sich dem Sehsinn überlassen, Abstand halten. Das ist nicht nur eine Schulung in Disziplin, die in den bürgerlichen Institutionen der Kunstausstellung eingeübt, sozial kontrolliert und längst auch technisch gesichert wird. Abstand zum Betrachter ist der Ausstellungskunst selbst eingeschrieben. Doch nicht erst seit technische Medien der Berührung und interaktive Ausstellungsformate die Museen erobert haben, stellt sich die Frage nach den Potenzialen des Taktilen in der Kunst.
Editor: Alina Payne
The Land Between Two Seas: Art on the Move in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 1300-1700 focuses on the strong riverine ties that connect the seas of the Mediterranean system (from the Western Mediterranean through the Sea of Marmara, the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov) and their hinterland. Addressing the mediating role of the Balkans between East and West all the way to Poland and Lithuania, as well as this region’s contribution to the larger Mediterranean artistic and cultural melting pot, this innovative volume explores ideas, artworks and stories that moved through these territories linking the cultures of Central Asia with those of western Europe.
Often considered as the first phenomenon of mass media in history, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of these supports by the partisans of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries.

The twelve contributors provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy of the Spanish Low Countries and underlines the mutually beneficial relationship between proponents of the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. It is therefore also an important contribution to our understanding of sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
Practices and Rituals, Visual and Material Transfer
Volume Editors: Yukiyo Kasai and Henrik H. Sørensen
The ERC-funded research project BuddhistRoad aims to create a new framework to enable understanding of the complexities in the dynamics of cultural encounter and religious transfer in pre-modern Eastern Central Asia. Buddhism was one major factor in this exchange: for the first time the multi-layered relationships between the trans-regional Buddhist traditions (Chinese, Indian, Tibetan) and those based on local Buddhist cultures (Khotanese, Uyghur, Tangut) will be explored in a systematic way. The second volume Buddhism in Central Asia II—Practice and Rituals, Visual and Materials Transfer based on the mid-project conference held on September 16th–18th, 2019, at CERES, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany) focuses on two of the six thematic topics addressed by the project, namely on “practices and rituals”, exploring material culture in religious context such as mandalas and talismans, as well as “visual and material transfer”, including shared iconographies and the spread of ‘Khotanese’ themes.
Volume Editors: Nadja Gernalzick and Joseph Imorde
The Mediality of Sugar probes the potential of reading sugar as a mediator across some of the disciplinary distinctions in early twenty-first century research in the arts, literature, architecture, and popular culture. Selected artistic practices and material cultures of sugar across Europe and the Americas from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century are investigated and connected to the transcontinental and transoceanic history of the sugar plants cane and beet, their botanical and cultural dissemination, and global sugar capital and trade under colonialism and in decoloniality. The collection contributes to the vision of a Transnational and Postdisciplinary Sugar Studies.
Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid
In Painting Flanders Abroad: Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid, Flemish immigrants and imported Flemish paintings cross the paths of Spanish kings, collectors, dealers, and artists in the Spanish court city, transforming the development and nature of seventeenth-century Spanish painting. Examining these Flemish transplants and the traces their interactions left in archival documents, collection inventories, art treatises, and most saliently Spanish “Golden Age” paintings, this book portrays Spanish society grappling with a long tradition of importing its favorite paintings while struggling to reimagine its own visual idiom. In the process, the book historicizes questions of style, quality, immigration, mobility, identity, and cultural exchange to define what the evolving and amorphous visual concept of “Flemishness” meant to Spanish viewers in an era long before the emergence of nationalism.
The electronic version of Avant-Garde Critical Studies, a series founded in 1987 for themed-anthologies and monographs on all aspects of avant-garde and avant-gardism in modern literature, theatre, music, visual and applied arts, architecture and design from the late nineteenth century to the present.

We publish high quality research on specific trends in single arts, countries and regions, as well as comparative and interdisciplinary studies in the interrelation between the different arts as well as between the arts, social and political contexts and cultural life in the broadest sense and all its diversity.
Thamyris seeks to initiate alternative forms of criticism by analysing the ways in which cultural and theoretical discourses intervene in the contemporary world. This criticism should pursue a re-politicizing and remobilizing of theoretical perspectives and cultural practices, preferably through case studies. Thamyris hopes to contribute to the productive interaction between art, activism, and theory. We understand cultural practices to include those of literary, visual, digital, and performance arts, but also social practices related to gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. In short, Thamyris aims at exploring the ways in which varying cultural practices, separately or in interaction, can be effective as agents of social and cultural change.
Collecting, Patronage and the Art Market in Italy, 1450-1650
Volume Editor: Inge Reist
Through case studies of collectors, patrons, and agents who redefined collecting and the art market, this volume illuminates how the changing status of the artist, rise of connoisseurship, role of intermediaries and new patterns of consumption established models for collecting and display that resemble those still practiced today. The book presents new research by recognized scholars who examine the motivations of collectors and agents, emphasizing how their collecting, patronage and advocacy could require support of artists whose reputations were not fully established. Together, the essays invite consideration of works that are familiar in art-historical terms but less so as markers of the socio-economic shifts of a particular cultural moment.

This book evolved from a symposium “When Michelangelo was Modern: The Art Market and Collecting in Italy, 1450–1650,” organized by the Center for the History of Collecting, that was held at The Frick Collection on April 12 and 13, 2019. Both the book and the symposium were made possible through the generous support of the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.

The book is published in association with The Frick Collection.