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An Exploration of Feeling, Value and Virtue
Author: Yinghua Lu
Critically developing the Contemporary New Confucianism, this book opens a new horizon for the study of emotions and philosophy of heart-mind and [human] nature by focusing on the communication between phenomenology, particularly Schelerian phenomenology, and Chinese philosophy, especially Mencius and Wang Yangming. Such communication demonstrates how ethics based on factual experience is possible, revealing the original spirit and fresh meaning of Confucian learning of the heart-mind. In clarifying crucial feelings and values, this work undertakes a detailed description of the heart’s concrete activities for the idea that “the heart has its own order,” allowing us to see the order of the heart and its deviated form clearly and comprehensively.
Volume Editors: Elizabeth Cavicchi and Peter Heering
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.    
Cultural and Biological Approaches to Uncover African Diversity
This book explores important chapters of past and recent African history from a multidisciplinary perspective. It covers an extensive time range from the evolution of early humans to the complex cultural and genetic diversity of modern-day populations in Africa. Through a comprehensive list of chapters, the book focuses on different time-periods, geographic regions and cultural and biological aspects of human diversity across the continent. Each chapter summarises current knowledge with perspectives from a varied set of international researchers from diverse areas of expertise. The book provides a valuable resource for scholars interested in evolutionary history and human diversity in Africa.

Contributors are Shaun Aron, Ananyo Choudhury, Bernard Clist, Cesar Fortes-Lima, Rosa Fregel, Jackson S. Kimambo, Faye Lander , Marlize Lombard, Fidelis T. Masao, Ezekia Mtetwa, Gilbert Pwiti, Michèle Ramsay, Thembi Russell, Carina Schlebusch, Dhriti Sengupta, Plan Shenjere-Nyabezi, Mário Vicente.
This interdisciplinary volume of essays explores how the notion of time varies across disciplines by examining variance as a defining feature of temporalities in cultural, creative, and scholarly contexts. Featuring a President’s Address by philosopher David Wood, it begins with critical reassessments of J.T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time through the lens of Anthropocene studies, philosophy, ecological theory, and ecological literature; proceeds to variant narratives in fiction, video games, film, and graphic novels; and concludes by measuring time’s variance with tools as different as incense clocks and computers, and by marking variance in music, film, and performance art.

Abstract

Mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) an important legume crop with valuable nutritional and health benefits is severely affected by drought conditions. Desiccation tolerance is a capacity of seeds to survive and maintain physiological activities during storage and stress conditions. LEA proteins are group of stress associated proteins that help the plants survive water deficit stress. Here we have performed genome-wide analysis of mungbean LEA (VrLEA) genes, and also insilico physical/functional characterization. Gene-positioning showed that 307 VrLEAs are present in all the eleven chromosomes, but are unevenly distributed.Upstream promoter sequence analysis of LEA genes revealed the occurrence of MYB transcription factor (TF)in higher number compared to other TFs i.e., bZIP, AP2, WRKY, NAC and bHLH.Further, we downstreamed our analysis to fewer VrLEAs, based on drought responsive data. The VrLEAs obtained from the earlier experimental data were examined for its organelle localization and found that they are intracellular functional proteins.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Abstract

The monitoring of xylogenesis makes it possible to follow tree growth responses to stress factors in real-time, by observing the course of wood cell division and differentiation. Proper microscopy techniques are of key importance to exactly identify the xylem cells during the different phases of differentiation. We aimed to apply epifluorescence microscopy to follow the lignification process during the different phases of xylogenesis in Mediterranean softwood and hardwood. Microcores from trees of Pinus halepensis Mill. and Arbutus unedo L. were collected at a site in southern Italy, during the period June-December. Fluorescence imaging of sections stained with a water solution of safranin and Astra blue clearly highlighted the contrast between lignified and un-lignified tissue. The proposed methodology is useful to quickly and unambiguously detect the different stages of cell differentiation, as well as the progress in the lignification process. Moreover, it proved to be easily applied to demanding wood materials, such as Mediterranean woods and can be helpful to better track stress responses and the development of anomalies during wood formation, such as intra-annual density fluctuations.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Structural differences in the secondary vascular tissues among habitats can contribute to understanding species performances, especially regarding water and photosynthate transport. The pattern of association between the secondary xylem tissue and water availability from the environment has been widely studied, unlike the secondary phloem, which has been barely explored. Here, we evaluated the structural variation of the secondary xylem and phloem in stems of four populations of two tropical tree species under contrasting water conditions. We also investigated the mirrored structure between both tissues. At dry sites, Moquiniastrum polymorphum had higher vessel density, thicker xylem fibers cell walls, and taller rays in both tissues commonly associated with safe transport, in agreement with our expectations. In contrast, the populations of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium had most features in disagreement with the water availability of each site. The perforation and sieve plates, the ray composition, and the axial parenchyma were similar in the two tree species’ xylem and phloem tissues. However, the quantitative descriptors of cell sizes were not correlated between the xylem and phloem. In general, there is a different pattern of morphological variation across sites in the two tropical tree species, highlighting that any generalization regarding the vascular system structure across environments should be avoided. Xylem and phloem revealed a mirrored structure in a few qualitative features, not followed by the dimensions of different cell types. Future research needs to explore the causes of the unexpected structural variation in the vascular system across populations in tropical tree species.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Branch canker disease caused by the fungus Macrophoma theicola is a major stem disease that reduces the yield of south Indian tea plantations. Hence the present study aimed to assess the efficacy of the biocontrol agent Trichoderma spp against various isolates of Macrophoma spp. For this matter, different tea-growing regions of south India were surveyed for the isolation and characterization of Macrophoma spp. Then, fungal biocontrol strains (Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma atroviride, Trichoderma harzianum, and Gliocladium virens) were procured from microbial type culture collection Centre (MTCC) to screen their antagonistic potential on different isolates Macrophoma spp. The spores of Macrophoma spp were examined through a light microscope and identified by their peculiar morphological features such as non-septum pycnidiospores present in the sac and oval shape spore with stalk and confirmed using 18S rRNA gene sequence. The results revealed that the biocontrol G. virens followed by T. harzianum showed a higher inhibitory effect on different isolates of Macrophoma spp in the dual plate and culture filtrate studies. In the well diffusion method, the fungal biocontrol agents were found to be exhibit non-significant differences on different isolates of branch canker pathogen. The hyphal interactions studies showed that the pathogenic hyphal wall shrunk and penetrated by the interaction of G. virens.

In: Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

Abstract

We describe two new fossil woods from the San Carlos Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Chihuahua State, Mexico. The first wood resembles the fossil genus Metcalfeoxylon in having solitary vessels, scalariform perforation plates, vessel-ray parenchyma pits of similar size as the intervessel pits, axial parenchyma apotracheal diffuse and diffuse in aggregates, and heterocellular multiseriate rays with long, uniseriate tails. The second wood is a new fossil genus, and it is characterized by having diffuse porous wood, vessels predominantly solitary, vessel outlines oval and tending to be of two diameter classes, simple perforation plates, minute alternate intervessel pits, vessel-ray parenchyma pits similar to intervessel pits in size and shape, vasicentric tracheids, non-septate fibers, homocellular rays, and exclusively uniseriate and biseriate rays. This combination of features supports its placement in Myrtales (?Myrtaceae), in a new fossil-genus named Lazarocardenasoxylon. These two new records provide more information about the floristic composition of the Late Cretaceous flora of the San Carlos Formation and its relationship with those from the southern USA. However, a definitive picture of the floristic relationship of these Cretaceous floras of northern Mexico and southern USA remains elusive.

In: IAWA Journal