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Studies in Interreligious and Intercultural Relations
Editor-in-Chief:
Currents of Encounter invites scholarly contributions that utilize interreligious, intercultural, comparative, postcolonial, and other contemporary critical interdisciplinary approaches from across all religious traditions, to address topical questions on the challenges and opportunities arising from intercultural/interreligious engagements, or the intersections of cultures and religions.

Studies dealing explicitly with the dynamics of the intersection of religious and cultural traditions are increasing every year, and scholars have become aware of the complexity and diversity of interreligious and intercultural relations. Recent literature offers a broad panoply of theoretical approaches from theologies of religions to comparative theologies, from discourse analysis to a postcolonial critique focusing on issues of power, from feminist readings asking about the specific role of women in interreligious dialogue to interreligious hermeneutics exploring how meaning may travel across cultural and religious traditions. Currents of Encounter welcomes this variety of works in these disciplines and from interdisciplinary perspectives aiming thus to contribute to a better understanding of the complexities of interreligious and intercultural themes. The board welcomes both monographs and edited volumes.
Possible domains:
- interreligious studies
- intercultural theology and philosophy
- comparative theology and philosophy
- theologies of religions
The series "Intercultural Theology and Study of Religions" will appear as a joint publication by Brill | Rodopi, Leiden - Boston and Verlag Königshausen und Neumann, Würzburg. The German editions will be published by Verlag Königshausen und Neumann, all other publications by Rodopi.

Die Reihe "Theologie Interkulturell und Studium der Religionen" wird gemeinsam von Brill | Rodopi, Leiden - Boston, und dem Verlag Königshausen und Neumann, Würzburg, herausgegeben. Die Veröffentlichungen in deutscher Sprache erscheinen im Verlag Königshausen und Neumann, alle anderen bei Rodopi.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
This wide-ranging and fascinating series supplements a growing catalogue of historical, sociological, and theological scholarship in the thriving and interdisciplinary field of Quaker Studies. Individual volumes will speak to the broad spectrum of Quaker belief and practice, to the significance of the history of Quaker traditions, and to the many areas in which Quaker Studies contributes to other fields in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Work on Quakerism impacts both wider church history and theological debate, as well as current themes in the sociology of religion. The Quaker attitude to spiritual equality also engages women’s studies scholars, and the Quaker commitment to peace and social justice relates to wider issues of political theory and peace studies. As the field of Quaker Studies continues to grow and redefine itself, this series will make a significant contribution to making up-to-date scholarship accessible to specialists as well as to a broad academic community.
Brill's Companions to Religious Studies, Theology and Philosophy Online is an expanding e-book collection of specially commissioned research companions. The focus is on contemporary religion, theology and philosophy. Peer reviewed and written by experts, these handbooks offer balanced accounts at an advanced level, along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. Designed for students and scholars, the books explain what sources there are, what methodologies and approaches are appropriate in dealing with them, what issues arise and how they have been treated, and what room there is for disagreement. All volumes are in English.

“Brill’s Companions to Religious Studies, Theology and Philosophy Online offer both students and scholars a range of topics and approaches to the study of religion. Whether they seek to engage with developments and currents in established religions like Christianity or new religious movements or look for topics such as anarchism or religion and science, they will find in this series a collection of essays that will introduce them to current scholarship on that topic. With each volume a considerable resource in its own right, combined, the companions form a repository and platform of academic discussion and study, offering peer-reviewed content which covers the state of existing research, methodologies, contemporary debates, and the directions future research might or should take.”
Elisabeth Arweck, University of Warwick

“The Brill’s Companion series has established itself as one of the essential reference collections that should find a place in the library of every Religious Studies scholar. Building on state-of-play surveys on a wide variety of topics, they also point to exciting new avenues for investigation. These volumes bring together cutting edge research by both established and emerging thinkers, and are invaluable both in the classroom and the study.”
Douglas E. Cowan, Renison University College

“Brill Companions greatly expand the possibilities for the study of religions, theologies and philosophies. Individual volumes are already a remarkable resource that enrich understanding of specific complexes and arenas of debate. They are focused and expert but accessible and inspiring. Together, this online collection not only surveys the state of the field but offers rich provocations for improved approaches, methods and discussion.”
Graham Harvey, The Open University, UK

“This new Brill online series is a great resource for scholars and students, drawing on twenty outstanding handbooks of sharp, accessible essays. The collections combine leading edge theory and method with rich empirical data and they communicate unrivalled expertise clearly and concisely. A fabulous set of tools for the study of religion/s!”
Steven Sutcliffe, University of Edinburgh

A Festschrift on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of BETH
Volume Editors: , , and
During the past 50 years, theological libraries have confronted secularisation and religious pluralism, along with revolutionary technological developments that brought not only significant challenges but also unexpected opportunities to adopt new instruments for the transfer of knowledge through the automation and computerisation of libraries. This book shows how European theological libraries tackled these challenges; how they survived by redefining their task, by participating in the renewal of scholarly librarianship, and by networking internationally. Since 1972, BETH, the Association of European Theological Libraries, has stimulated this process by enabling contacts among a growing number of national library associations all over Europe.

Abstract

This essay reviews the two types of spirituality present in Augustine’s Confessions: on the one hand his former Manichaean-Christian belief and its practices, on the other hand his newly won Catholic-Christian mindset. More than ever thought, throughout the Confessions both forms of spirituality appear to be engaged in a breath-taking dialogue. Many examples of this unexpected discourse are given in the course of this exposition covering the entire Confessions. Its author argues that the most famous work of the African born Augustine should be read anew from its original perspective.

In: Religion and Theology

Abstract

This article examines Apollo’s prophecy at Delphi as well as prophecy in ancient Judaism and ancient Christianity in light of recent scholarship on the demise of religions. I argue that two questions remain about ancient narratives of decline amidst the scholarship on the death of religions. First, how should scholars engage ancient narratives of decline that threaten to erase other practices, beliefs, and rhetoric? Second, what about the challenges of defining a ‘religion’ that declines? Brent Nongbri has suggested that categories other than religion may provide more fruitful avenues for describing antiquity; I argue that prophecy is one such category.

In: Religion and Theology

Abstract

Considering recent ‘Death of Religion’ literature, this essay concludes that ‘death’ is not a particularly helpful metaphor to describe historical changes in the area of religion. A human lifespan metaphor is inappropriate for understanding the transformation of religion on the ground. The question should rather center on the transformation of religion as a feature of real, historical cultures. This essay explores what this means for the study of transformations of religions in Late Antiquity by focusing on materiality of religion and the enduring agency of religious spaces. In the larger context of religious change in history, the ‘presences,’ the ghosts and powers, radiated by places – by temples and caves, hillsides and springs – should be given more prominence in this discussion of religious twilights and religious demise.

In: Religion and Theology
Free access
In: Religion and Theology
Author:

Abstract

Populism on political, economic and various other levels, has become part of the discourse of the contemporary world, and in its intersections with race, has led to various mutations which also impact on scholarly tendencies within and perceptions about biblical studies. The many entanglements of populism with religion, often under the guise of secularism include also its engagement with the Bible as cultural artifact. The legacy of a deracialised Bible has meant that the value of the category of race, was until recently not considered for the study of the Bible, and race denied as factor to be considered in academic scholarship with the assumption that Jesus follower- or Christian identity excluded racial connotations. Re-introducing categories of race and ethnicity in biblical studies, in their intersections with whiteness and white privilege studies, resonates with but also stands in tension with the current age of populism.

In: Religion and Theology