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The collected papers in this book address an array of important issues in the field of Historical Linguistics and, specifically, Indo-European Linguistics, including different theoretical approaches and innovative methodologies for studying language organization and change, building on the strict relationship between Linguistics and Philology. The papers provide significant contributions to the understanding of aspects of variation, contact and reconstruction, reflect a wide range of perspectives, and focus on issues and data from a large variety of languages. The themes that emerge from the papers center around two main research lines: 1. the relationship between language facts and historical accidents; 2. the relationship between grammatical categories and conceptual representations. The book is of interest for any reader seeking to gain insight into the nature of language organization and change.
How is it possible to write down the Japanese language exclusively in Chinese characters? And how are we then able to determine the language behind the veil of the Chinese script as Japanese? The history of writing in Japan presents us with a fascinating variety of writing styles ranging from phonography to morphography and all shades in between.
In Japanese Morphography: Deconstructing hentai kanbun, Gordian Schreiber shows that texts traditionally labelled as “hentai kanbun” or “variant Chinese” are, in fact, morphographically written Japanese texts instead and not just the result of an underdeveloped skill in Chinese. The study fosters our understanding of writing system typology beyond phonographic writing.
Editor-in-Chief: Zhi CHEN
This is a peer-reviewed, inclusive, non-Eurocentric, multi-disciplinary book series devoted to the interdisciplinary study of ancient civilizations from all continents.
- ALAC is fully-funded by the Research Centre For History and Culture (RCHC). All volumes are published under a CC BY-NC-ND license.
- Proposals must present original work and must have been submitted exclusively to ALAC. Both monographs and edited volumes are welcome.
- Submissions may regard any civilizations from any continents, developed between prehistory and the 15th century AD, that is, the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire.
- Submissions may regard any aspects of Antiquity: history, archaeology, art and architecture, philology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, etc.
- ALAC also considers studies of oral literature, such as proverbs and folklore, as well as field work on endangered languages, which represent the legacy of ancient traditions verbally transmitted from generation to generation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and full manuscripts by email to the Series Editors: Professor CHEN Zhi , Professor Carlotta Viti , and Dr WANG Xiang (Shawn Wang) .
From its Hijazi Origins to its Classical Reading Traditions
What was the language of the Quran like, and how do we know? Today, the Quran is recited in ten different reading traditions, whose linguistic details are mutually incompatible. This work uncovers the earliest linguistic layer of the Quran. It demonstrates that the text was composed in the Hijazi vernacular dialect, and that in the centuries that followed different reciters started to classicize the text to a new linguistic ideal, the ideal of the ʿarabiyyah. This study combines data from ancient Quranic manuscripts, the medieval Arabic grammarians and ample data from the Quranic reading traditions to arrive at new insights into the linguistic history of Quranic Arabic.
Im Zentrum dieses Teils der baskischen Schriften Wilhelm von Humboldts steht die Frage nach dem Verhältnis des Baskischen zum Iberischen, Keltiberischen und anderen Sprachen des vorrömischen Europa.
Die neue Edition der Schriften zur Sprachwissenschaft Wilhelm von Humboldts zielt darauf ab, die erst in den 1990er Jahren wiederentdeckten, verschollen geglaubten Nachlasspapiere Wilhelm von Humboldts zu edieren. Das Baskische war für viele Jahre ein wichtiger Forschungsgegenstand Humboldts. Die erste große Beschäftigung mit einer nicht-indogermanischen Sprache und die Kontakte mit frühen baskischen Grammatikern, Literaten und Intellektuellen führte dazu, retrospektiv diese Episode seines Lebens als die der Herausbildung sprachwissenschaftlichen Denkens zu bezeichnen. Er plante ein großes dreibändiges Baskenwerk. Der nun vorgelegte dritte Band rekonstruiert die Genese seiner einschlägig sehr intensiv rezipierten und diskutierten Schrift zur Stellung des Baskischen im vorrömischen Spanien und im alten Europa.
This volume presents the up-to-date results of investigations into the Asian origins of the only two language families of North America that are widely acknowledged as having likely genetic links in northern Asia. It brings together all that has been proposed to date under the respective rubrics of the Uralo-Siberian (Eskimo-Yukaghir-Uralic) hypothesis and the Dene-Yeniseian hypothesis. The evolution of the two parallel research strategies for fleshing out these linguistic links between North America and Asia are compared and contrasted. Although focusing on stringently controlled linguistic reconstructions, the volume draws upon archaeological and human genetic data where relevant.
In: Signs and Media
In: Signs and Media
Author: Sarah Colvin

Abstract

This article acknowledges racism and sexism as ethical problems in Grimmelshausen’s novel Courasche. Its charismatic protagonist is not only old and a woman (and therefore arguably a witch), but adds racialised exclusion to her portfolio when she narrates her autobiography in blackface. Here the author interrogates Grimmelshausen’s narratorial masks using Medina’s conception of the infelicitous subject, who has a paradoxical double function: infelicitous subjects simultaneously demonstrate how things should not be done and sow seeds of doubt about the practices and beliefs of the normative economy. Recognising the problem racism and sexism represent in Courasche raises the question whether Grimmelshausen’s engagement with knowledge is conventional or innovative; whether Courasche merely reproduces, or also destabilises, epistemic injustice. Courasche as a protagonist is an exemplar of transgression. But is her transgressive infelicity epistemically constitutive – does it contribute to the creation of new discursive contexts?

Open Access
In: Daphnis