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This is a collection of international law materials relating to the Philippines: excerpts of treaties and declarations; international judicial and arbitral decisions; and Philippine constitutional clauses, statutes and Supreme Court decisions.

Today new theories abound, calling for comparative perspectives that look at international law through the lens of national and regional practice. This book engages with that challenge at a concrete level, e.g., how Marcos's human rights abuses were litigated abroad but never in Philippine courts, and how victim claims for reparations are, ironically, blocked by the Philippine Government citing the Filipino people’s competing claims over Marcos's ill-gotten wealth. It retells Philippine history using international law, and re-examines international law using the Philippine experience.
This volume offers a series of short and highly self-reflective essays by leading international lawyers on the relation between international law and crises. It particularly shows that international law shapes the crises that it addresses as much as it is shaped by them. It critically evaluates the modes of intervention of international law in the problems of the world. Together these essays provide a unique stocktaking about the role, limits, and potential of international law as well as the worlds that are imagined through international lawyers’ vocabularies.
Author: Carol Chi Ngang
In The Right to Development in Africa, Carol Chi Ngang provides a conceptual analysis of the human right to development with a decolonial critique of the requirement to have recourse to development cooperation as a mechanism for its realisation. In his argumentation, the setbacks to development in Africa are not necessarily caused by the absence of development assistance but principally as a result of the lack of an operational model to steer the processes for development towards the highest attainable standard of living for the peoples of Africa. Basing on the decolonial and capability theories, he posits for a shift in development thinking from dependence on development assistance to an alternative model suited to Africa, which he defines as the right to development governance.