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A Historical Narrative from Ignatius of Loyola to Pedro Arrupe
Author: Festo Mkenda SJ
Jesuits have been in Africa since they were founded, yet their history there remains poorly documented. Although scholars have started to focus on specific regions like Congo, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, a comprehensive picture of the entire Jesuit experience on the continent is still lacking. In a condensed yet accessible way, Jesuits in Africa fills that lacuna. Narrating the story century by century from the time of St. Ignatius of Loyola (c.1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, to that of Pedro Arrupe (1907-91, in office 1965-83), 28th general superior of the Society, the book makes Jesuit history in Africa available to a general readership while offering scholars a broad view in which specialized topics can be conceived and deepened.
The Theology of God’s Power and Its Bearing on the Western Legal Tradition, 1100–1600
With a foreword by Diego Quaglioni

This book attempts to determine the degree to which the modern fate of the Western legal tradition depends on one of the most long-standing debates of the Middle Ages, the distinction between potentia Dei absoluta and ordinata (God’s absolute and ordered power). The mediaeval investigation into God’s attributes was originally concerned with the problem of divine almightiness. It underwent a slow but steady displacement from the territory of theology to the freshly emerging proceedings of legal analysis. Here, based on the distinction, late-mediaeval lawyers worked out a new terminology to define the extent of the power-holder’s authority. This effort would give rise, during the early modern era, to the gradual establishment of the legal-political framework represented by the concepts of the prince and sovereignty.
In Alfonso de Cartagena’s 'Memoriale virtutum' (1422) María Morrás and Jeremy Lawrance offer a new edition from the manuscripts of a compilation of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics addressed by the major Castilian intellectual of the day, bishop Alfonso de Cartagena, to the heir to the throne of Portugal, crown prince Duarte.
The work was a speculum principis, an education for the future king in the virtues suitable to a statesman; Cartagena’s choice of Aristotle was thus a significant index of the advent of new Renaissance ideas. This edition shows how the “memorial” throws light on the ideological transformation of society those ideas would bring, setting new ethical guidelines for the ruling class at the crossroads between medieval feudalism and Renaissance absolutism.
Volume 1: Concepts, Perspectives, and the Emergence of Augustinian Identity
The culmination of thirty years of research, Eric Leland Saak’s Augustinian Theology in the Later Middle Ages offers a comprehensive, new interpretation of late medieval Augustinianism. The first of a two-volume work, the present book sets the stage and analyzes the conceptual and methodological structures requisite for interpreting the reception of Augustine in the later Middle Ages historically, together with explicating the first two of the four “pillars” of Augustinian theology: the Augustinian Hermits’ political theology; the teaching in the Order’s schools; the Order’s university theology; and its moral theology. Holistically fused with the Order’s religious identity, these distinct yet interconnected components of Augustinian theology, rather than a narrow, theologically defined anti-Pelagianism, provided the context for the emergence of the Reformation.
The medieval dissenters known as ‘Waldenses’, named after their first founder, Valdes of Lyons, have long attracted careful scholarly study, especially from specialists writing in Italian, French and German. Waldenses were found across continental Europe, from Aragon to the Baltic and East-Central Europe. They were long-lived, resilient, and diverse. They lived in a special relationship with the prevailing Catholic culture, making use of the Church’s services but challenging its claims.

Many Waldenses are known mostly, or only, because of the punitive measures taken by inquisitors and the Church hierarchy against them. This volume brings for the first time a wide-ranging, multi-authored interpretation of the medieval Waldenses to an English-language readership, across Europe and over the four centuries until the Reformation.

Contributors include: Marina Benedetti, Peter Biller, Luciana Borghi Cedrini, Euan Cameron, Jacques Chiffoleau, Albert De Lange, Andrea Giraudo, Franck Mercier, Grado Giovanni Merlo, Georg Modestin, Martine Ostorero, Damian J. Smith, Claire Taylor, and Kathrin Utz Tremp.
Author: Andreas J. Beck
Gisbertus Voetius (1589–1676) on God, Freedom, and Contingency: An Early Modern Reformed Voice is the first study in English entirely devoted to the theology of Voetius, a leading figure of Reformed scholasticism. Andreas J. Beck examines Voetius’s life and his concept of theology. Moreover, he provides a fresh and detailed analysis of Voetius’s views on God, freedom, and contingency in the context of related early modern debates. Special attention is given to transconfessional relations and relevant backgrounds in patristic theology, medieval scholasticism, and the European Reformations. This study also advances our knowledge of scholarly practices in theological education at early modern Reformed universities in the Low Countries.
Contributor: Jürgen Gröschl
The Letters of Johann Ernst Bergmann, edited and translated by Russell Kleckley, chronicles the experiences and perceptions of a German Lutheran pastor called to serve a struggling community in the American South soon after the Revolutionary War. Written mostly to Bergmann’s superiors at the important center of German Pietism in Halle, the letters not only report on conditions in Ebenezer, Georgia, established over a half-century earlier by religious refugees from Salzburg, they also offer a distinctive and often critical look at American culture, religion, and politics from an outsider’s viewpoint. Bergmann stresses the practical and corrosive impact of American notions of freedom in everyday life while also commenting on a wide range of other issues, including Georgia’s relationship with Native Americans and the practice of slavery.
Erinnerungspolitik und historische Kontroversen in der Bundesrepublik 1945-1980. Übersetzt von Charlotte P. Kieslich
Wurden Papst Pius XII. und die katholische Kirche nach 1945 wegen ihres Verhaltens während der Herrschaft der Nationalsozialisten unverhältnismäßig in den Fokus gerückt?
Mark Edward Ruff untersucht die heftigen Kontroversen über das Verhältnis zwischen der katholischen Kirche und dem NS-Regime, die in der Bundesrepublik zwischen 1945 und 1980 ausbrachen – etwa über Rolf Hochhuths Schauspiel „Der Stellvertreter“ von 1963. Er beleuchtet dabei, warum diese kulturellen Gefechte so viel Kraft kosteten, die Schlagzeilen beherrschten, Klagen vor Gericht auslösten und zum Einschreiten von Außenministerien führten. Nach Ruff waren diese Kontroversen über die Beziehung zwischen Kirche und Nationalsozialismus oftmals Stellvertreterkriege um die Positionierung der Kirche in der „modernen“ Welt – in der Politik, internationalen Beziehungen und den Medien. Im Mittelpunkt dieser Auseinandersetzungen standen in den meisten Fällen Konflikte, die durch die gestiegene politische Bedeutung des Katholizismus und die Integration katholischer Bürgerinnen und Bürger in die Mitte der Gesellschaft ausgelöst wurden.
The History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia
Author: Brian Douglas
In The Anglican Eucharist in Australia, Brian Douglas explores the History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia. The story begins with the first white settlement in 1788 and continues to the present day. The three eucharistic liturgies used in the ACA, and the debates that led to them, are examined in depth: The Book of Common Prayer (1662); An Australian Prayer Book (1978); and A Prayer Book for Australia (1995). The deep sacramentality of the Aboriginal people is acknowledged and modern issues such as liturgical development, lay presidency and virtual Eucharists are also explored. The book concludes with some suggestions for the further development of eucharistic liturgies within the ACA.
Catholic Debates at the Time of Trent. With an Edition and Translation of Key Documents
Author: Wietse de Boer
The Catholic Church answered Reformation-era contestations of the cult of images in a famous decree of the Council of Trent (1563). Art in Dispute revisits this response by focusing on its antecedents rather than its consequences. The mid-sixteenth century saw, besides new scholarship on Byzantine doctrines, heated debates about neo-scholastic interpretations. Disagreement, suppressed at Trent but re-emerging soon afterwards, centered on the question whether religious images were solely signs referring to holy subjects or also sacred objects in their own right. It was a debate with major implications for art theory and devotional practice.

The volume contains editions and translations of texts by Martín Pérez de Ayala, Matthieu Ory, Jean Calvin, Ambrogio Catarino Politi, and Iacopo Nacchianti, along with a previously unknown draft of the Tridentine decree.