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Evil women, who are they really? What are their motives, and how are they remembered and constructed within our culture? Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film seeks to interrogate the nature and construction of evil women in the above fields. Through literature, poetry, history, ballads, film and real-life culture, scholars explore how the evil woman has been constructed and, in some cases, erased; the punishment and treatment of evil women; and the way evil women have been portrayed on and off screen through character, narrative and behind the camera development.
Volume Editor: Sanjay Lal
Events in recent times have led many to rightly question the compatibility such traditionally revered concepts as democracy, liberal tolerance, and capitalism have with the realization of social peace. Clearly, it can no longer be uncritically assumed that the values championed by earlier generations are conducive to reaching peaceful outcomes. In Peaceful Approaches for a More Peaceful World, a wide array of scholars explore the challenges presented in the current age to conventional understandings of what is required for peace and provide insights that are both practical and constructive to a world in urgent need of conceiving new ways forward.
This essay presents Gould’s distinctive system for analyzing kin terminologies showing the system’s power, importance, and usefulness—and showing its relationship to other approaches and the payoffs each aims at. In revealing significant new empirical regularities and simplifications, Gould’s analytic system implies important constraints on future analytic and interpretative approaches to kin terminologies. Some of these new insights involve the demonstration of the effect of distributed collective cognitive systems over and above the effects of repeated iterations of individual cognitive constraints or pressures. It is the peculiar nature of the kinterm domain that allows these findings to be so directly shown, but the implication is that these findings apply more generally to the collective cognitive systems that make up language and culture.
Volume Editors: Olli Loukola and Leonidas Donskis
Secrets and conspiracies have always played an important role in human history, and today conspiracy theories have become a rather disconcerting practice for picturing our world and our relations with each other. How seriously are we to take them, then? Are we to completely discard them as political rhetoric, purposeful misinformation, or even individual delusions? Or should we take them as serious, perhaps even scientific theories? This collection purports to provide a sober analysis of the much-debated issues and tries to develop and outline conceptual and theoretical tools to make sense of what secrets and conspiracies truly are.
From Hip Hop Philosophy to Politics and Performance Art
Volume Editor: Jerold J. Abrams
This edited collection provides an in-depth and wide-ranging exploration of pragmatist philosopher Richard Shusterman’s distinctive project of “somaesthetics,” devoted not only to better understanding bodily experience but also to greater mastery of somatic perception, performance, and presentation. Against contemporary trends that focus narrowly on conceptual and computational thinking, Shusterman returns philosophy to what is most fundamental—the sentient, expressive, human body with its creations of living beauty. Twelve scholars here provide penetrating critical analyses of Shusterman on ontology, perception, language, literature, culture, politics, aesthetics, cuisine, music, and the visual arts, including films of his work in performance art.
An Ethnography of the Classics-reading Movement in Contemporary China
Author: Sandra Gilgan
Sandra Gilgan’s Utopia in the Revival of Confucian Education examines the classics-reading movement in contemporary China as not only driven by attraction to certain elements of tradition, but even more by caesuras in the past that caused people to detach from their cultural roots. The author argues that activism in the classics-reading movement arises from an entanglement of past, present, and future. Social and political upheaval in the near past of the twentieth century caused people to disconnect from their traditional culture and ways of living, resulting in the present need to reconnect with perceived “original” culture and tradition from the more distant past. Through peoples’ imaginaries of a better future that are informed by past traditions, new ways of the past find entrance into life and education in study halls and academies. This new study draws on multi-sited ethnographic field research in ten Chinese cities, with the broadest database currently available. It combines theoretical elements from anthropology, history, sociology and sinology in a grounded theory approach. As an interdisciplinary study, the book is of interest for academics in Asian and Chinese studies, heritage and memory studies, religious studies, educational sciences, history, and cultural anthropology, as well as social and political sciences.