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In der späten Kaiserzeit dominierte eine Zwischenform von Panegyrik und Geschichtsschreibung, deren Zeugnisse mit diesem Band für das vierte und frühe fünfte Jahrhundert vorgestellt werden. Dabei geht es vor allem um die Reste von Darstellungen der Regierung Konstantins und Julians (Praxagoras, Bemarchios, Eustochios, Iulianus Imperator, Biblidion, Kyllenios, Oreibasios, Kallistion, Magnos von Karrhai, Eutychianos, Philagrios, Seleukos von Emesa). Mitberücksichtigt werden auch einige Sonderfälle, insbesondere der erste Teil des Anonymus Valesianus, der eng mit der panegyrischen Zeitgeschichtsschreibung der Epoche Konstantins verbunden ist, sowie einige Epen, die in ihrer detaillierten historiographischen Struktur mit der panegyrischen Zeitgeschichte eng verwandt sind.
Author:
Cassius Dio described his own age as one of “iron and rust.” This study, which is the first of its kind in English, examines the decline and decay that Cassius Dio diagnosed in this period (180-229 CE) through an analysis of the author’s historiographic method and narrative construction. It shows that the final books were a crucial part of Dio’s work, and it explains how Dio approached a period that he considered unworthy of history in view of his larger historiographic project.
Dialogi tres in Lactentium

Critical Latin Edition, English Translation, Introduction, and Notes
Antonio da Rho’s Three Dialogues against Lactantius (1445) followed the lead of Jerome and Augustine yet went well beyond patristic concerns. During the Middle Ages Lactantius’ works, while largely neglected, had enjoyed moments of intense interest and study. From the death of Lactantius (325) to his broad Quattrocento recovery, many profound cultural and intellectual shifts had transpired. Consequently, Rho’s dialogues engage topics arising from scholastic and other debates in jurisprudence, cosmology, astrology, geography, philosophy, and theology. He was convinced that insights from these fields would elucidate errors of Lactantius that his readers had overlooked. This reveals much about the cultural and intellectual developments that shaped readers’ efforts to recover, comprehend, and define Lactantius as an author. Significantly, the list of Lactantius’ errors discussed in the dialogues was printed with nearly every edition of Lactantius through the sixteenth century and beyond.
Volume Editor:
J. L. Moles (1949–2015) made fundamental contributions to the fields of ancient (especially Cynic) philosophy, Greek and Roman historiography and biography, Latin poetry, and New Testament studies. These two volumes gather together all of his major articles and reviews, along with six previously unpublished papers. The papers display Moles’ individual and sometimes iconoclastic approach, his impressive range in both Classical and New Testament texts, and his unrivalled abilities in close reading. This is a 2-volume set.
Editor:
J. L. Moles (1949–2015) made fundamental contributions to the fields of ancient (especially Cynic) philosophy, Greek and Roman historiography and biography, Latin poetry, and New Testament studies. These two volumes gather together all of his major articles and reviews, along with six previously unpublished papers. The papers display Moles’ individual and sometimes iconoclastic approach, his impressive range in both Classical and New Testament texts, and his unrivalled abilities in close reading. This is volume 1.
Editor:
J. L. Moles (1949–2015) made fundamental contributions to the fields of ancient (especially Cynic) philosophy, Greek and Roman historiography and biography, Latin poetry, and New Testament studies. These two volumes gather together all of his major articles and reviews, along with six previously unpublished papers. The papers display Moles’ individual and sometimes iconoclastic approach, his impressive range in both Classical and New Testament texts, and his unrivalled abilities in close reading. This is volume 2.
Author:
This volume sheds new light on the extraordinary richness and variety of love poetry written in Latin from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. It shows how Latin love poets reworked classical Roman and Greek models, and engaged in dialogue with mediaeval and contemporary vernacular traditions of poetry. They used the poetic language of love in Latin to reflect and comment on wider social, ethical and literary issues, and reconfigured its codes of representation in response to changing conceptions of love in the philosophical and religious spheres. Their poetry often aligned itself with dominant discourses of power and gender, but it could also be subtly subversive or even openly transgressive.
From the Books of Maccabees to the Babylonian Talmud
This volume offers a comprehensive discussion of all relevant sources concerning Jewish martyrdom in Antiquity. By viewing these narratives together, tracing their development and comparing them to other traditions, the authors seek to explore how Jewish is Jewish martyrdom? To this end, they analyse the impact of the changing social and religious-cultural circumstances and the interactions with Graeco-Roman and Christian traditions. This results in the identification of important continuities and discontinuities. Consequently, while political ideals that are prominent in 2 and 4 Maccabees are remarkably absent from rabbinic sources, the latter reveal a growing awareness of Christian motifs and discourse.
Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries
Memory and Commemoration across Central Asia: Texts, Traditions and Practices, 10th-21st Centuries is a collection of fourteen studies by a group of scholars active in the field of Central Asian Studies, presenting new research into various aspects of the rich cultural heritage of Central Asia (including Afghanistan). By mapping and exploring the interaction between political, ideological, literary and artistic production in Central Asia, the contributors offer a wide range of perspectives on the practice and usage of historical and religious commemoration in different contexts and timeframes. Making use of different approaches – historical, literary, anthropological, or critical heritage studies, the contributors show how memory functions as a fundamental constituent of identity formation in both past and present, and how this has informed perceptions in and outside Central Asia today.
Author:
Did you know that many reputed Neo-Latin authors like Erasmus of Rotterdam also wrote in forms of Ancient Greek? Erasmus used this New Ancient Greek language to celebrate a royal return from Spain to Brussels, to honor deceded friends like Johann Froben, to pray while on a pilgrimage, and to promote a new Aristotle edition. But classical bilingualism was not the prerogative of a happy few Renaissance luminaries: less well-known humanists, too, activated their classical bilingual competence to impress patrons; nuance their ideas and feelings; manage information by encoding gossip and private matters in Greek; and adorn books and art with poems in the two languagges, and so on. As reader, you discover promising research perspectives to bridge the gap between the long-standing discipline of Neo-Latin studies and the young field of New Ancient Greek studies.