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From the 6th century onwards, Syriac patristic florilegia – collections of Greek patristic excerpts in Syriac translation – progressively became a prominent form through which Syriac and Arab Christians shaped their knowledge of theology. In these collections, early Greek Christian literature underwent a substantial process of selection and re-organization. The papers collected in this volume study Syriac florilegia in their own right, as cultural products possessing their own specific textuality, and outline a phenomenology of Syriac patristic florilegia by mapping their diffusion and relevance in time and space, from the 6th to the 17th century, from the Roman Empire to China.
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Later Platonists and their Heirs among Christians, Jews and Muslims offers a thought-provoking exploration of the reception of Platonism among communities of faith from early Christianity to the sixteenth century, from the Byzantine East to the Latin West. Rare emphasis is placed on the importance of Platonic thought and its diffusion in late antique and medieval Syria, Armenia, and Georgia but also among Arab and Jewish intellectuals from the seventh century onwards. As such, the volume makes a statement against the separation of Neoplatonic philosophy from Christianity and the other Abrahamic faiths, since all four traditions promoted a life of virtue and goodness despite operating under different divine auspices. The volume seeks to establish paths of transmission and modes of adaptation across times and places.
An Analysis of the Revisional Process and Its Semitic Source
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This study advances our knowledge regarding the character of the version of Daniel attributed to Theodotion within the larger framework of the Theodotionic problem in Septuagint research. This is achieved in two ways. In addition to demonstrating the recensional character of Theodotion-Daniel and describing its revising techniques, it also breaks new ground on Theodotion’s Hebrew-Aramaic source. The findings compellingly argue for the theory that Theodotion-Daniel is a systematic revision of the Old Greek in conformity with a Semitic text form which often preserved original readings against the Masoretic Text and the Qumran scrolls.
THB 3D brings together for the first time information on the science and technologies that increasingly impact and influence not only the decipherment, study, and conservation of ancient manuscripts of all types, but also the textual criticism of biblical texts itself. It discusses issues of manuscript conservation, analytical tools, and (virtual) manuscript enhancement as well as electronic databases of biblical texts or digital online repositories of biblical manuscripts and much, much more.
The apocryphal Apocalypse of Paul (Visio Pauli) plunges us right into the heart of early-Christian conceptions of heaven and hell. Its vivid eyewitness account of otherworldly punishment and reward was translated into many different languages and inspired numerous later authors, among whom Dante. This book offers a re-edition and English translation of the ancient Coptic version. An exhaustive commentary makes the text accessible and situates it in the time and place where it was written, fourth-century Egypt. As this new study shows, the Coptic version is by far the best available witness of the original Apocalypse of Paul.
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Though references to Greek myths will hardly surprise the reader of western European literature, the reception history of Greek mythology is far richer and includes such lesser known traditions as the Armenian one. Greek myths were known to medieval Armenians through translations of late classical and early Christian writings and through the original works of Armenian authors. However, accessing them in their Armenian incarnations is no easy task. References to them are difficult to find as they are scattered over the vast medieval Armenian written corpus. Furthermore, during the process of translation, transmission, retelling, and copying of Greek mythical stories, Greek names, words, and plot details frequently became corrupted.
In this first-of-its-kind study, Gohar Muradyan brings together all the known references to ancient Greek myths (154 episodes) in medieval Armenian literature. Alongside the original Armenian passages and, when extant, their Greek originals, she provides annotated English translations. She opens the book with an informative introduction and concludes with useful appendices listing the occurrences of Greek gods, their Armenian equivalents, images, altars, temples, and rites, as well as Aesop’s fables and the Trojan War.
The Philosophical Critique of Christianity in Late Antiquity and the Enlightenment
The present study, for the first time, provides a comparative analysis of the objections raised against Christianity by late antique pagan philosophers (esp. Celsus in Alethes logos, Porphyry in Contra Christianos, and Julian the Apostate in Contra Gali-laeos) and Enlightenment philosophers and freethinkers and examines the impact of pagan thinking on the critique of Christianity in the 16th to 18th centuries – in particular, on discussions concerning the authority of the Bible, biblical exegesis, the Christian concept of faith, religious coercion and the uniformity of faith, the belief in miracles, and the Christ-ian understanding of morality.
Authoritative, and Fully Annotated, based on the best Syriac Text
The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. Syriac was the form of Aramaic used in the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia the birthplace of the Peshitta.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as published in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. The translation are also furnished with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.
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Authoritative, Based on the Best Syriac Text, and Fully Annotated The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. It is named after the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia, the birthplace of the Peshitta and home to the form of Aramaic now called Syriac.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as made available in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. Its volumes also come with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.
Brill's Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Online, Collection 2023 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity in 2023.

Coverage:
Biblical Studies, Ancient Judaism, Ancient Near East, Egyptology, Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnosticism & Manichaeism, Early Church & Patristics

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

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